Taking a brake...

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MarkS
Posts: 282
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2008 1:15 am

Taking a brake...

Postby MarkS » Wed May 15, 2013 6:53 pm

Like many of you here, I built up over the years a collection of freight stock and I tend to have one or two in progress since they tend to be easier to work on in small instalments.
Currently, I am working on the last kit in the box, appropriately a Brake Van.
It is a Parkside Dundas Midland 20 ton Van to D1659, and according to "Illustrated History of Southern Wagons" the Somerset & Dorset acquired 3 of these in 1925.

Here it is with the first coat of paint:
P1040613.JPG
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I am using Bill Bedford sprung units, behind the masking tape, which involved a bit of filing of the solebars:
P1040614.JPG
P1040614.JPG (130.3 KiB) Viewed 5831 times


And keeping with the theme, a D&S kit for the S&D 6 wheel van, I built a few years ago...
SDJR 8.jpg
SDJR 8.jpg (130.97 KiB) Viewed 5831 times
Cheers,

Mark.
"In the end, when all is said and done, more will have been said than done..."

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Russ Elliott
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Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2011 6:38 pm

Re: Taking a brake...

Postby Russ Elliott » Wed May 15, 2013 6:58 pm

Too clean! Too clean!

Love that 6-wheel road van though, what are the handrail fixings?

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MarkS
Posts: 282
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2008 1:15 am

Re: Taking a brake...

Postby MarkS » Wed May 15, 2013 7:06 pm

Russ, I know, I know, I'll work on it - but the underframe is quite filthy...
The handrail fixings are Markits small knobs (they look OK as long as you don't get too close), and bent brass wire.
Cheers,

Mark.
"In the end, when all is said and done, more will have been said than done..."

nigelcliffe
Posts: 621
Joined: Mon Jul 21, 2008 8:31 am

Re: Taking a brake...

Postby nigelcliffe » Wed May 15, 2013 10:10 pm

The photo sequence makes me think of the ultimate "shake the box" kit. Start with a MR brake 4-wheeled van body, roll it over, and "ta-da" appears a six-wheeled S&D van with exterior timbers, handrails, etc.. :D

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MarkS
Posts: 282
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2008 1:15 am

Re: Taking a brake...

Postby MarkS » Wed May 22, 2013 3:20 am

Nigel, I had to read your comment a few times, but my smile got bigger each time...

However, further work has ensued, some weathering is in place.
The position of the lettering is speculative and I have to continue speculating:
a) would the handrails be black? (1928),
b) would the S&D have installed permanent lamps on the sides?, probably, so I need to figure out where.

SDJR No 23.jpg
SDJR No 23.jpg (118.27 KiB) Viewed 5619 times
Cheers,

Mark.
"In the end, when all is said and done, more will have been said than done..."

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Paul Townsend
Posts: 861
Joined: Mon Sep 14, 2009 6:09 pm

Re: Taking a brake...

Postby Paul Townsend » Wed May 22, 2013 6:46 am

[quote="MarkS"]
a) would the handrails be black? (1928),
b) would the S&D have installed permanent lamps on the sides?, probably, so I need to figure out where.

I can't answer those questions but I do know that the ironwork reinforcing timber joints should be black.

beachboy
Posts: 99
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 4:35 pm

Re: Taking a brake...

Postby beachboy » Wed May 22, 2013 9:06 am

Mark,

From my studies of pre group - up to Edwardian days metalwork was often blacked up. The Brake ends painted var. shades of red to help sighting following collisions. Which may explain why the 6 wheeler in the earlier light grey with lettering shaded, the side handrails look black, & ends a lighter colour. From WW1 the detail painting appeared to stop; & the lighter greys became darker. I did read once of several Co's buying up surplus naval greys for painting wagons, which may help in explaining the darker appearance, over tarnishing or pigments reacting to the enviroment.

Another thing to consider is that on particularly darker colours, whilst a wagon may be painted overall grey. The metal work often appears to contrast in tone, which I believe is the paint siting on the metal suface and reflecting the light. Wheras the wood sheeting has absorbed the paint to a lighter / mat or not so reflective shade. Which provides the opportunity to vary the grey colouring and varnishes.

I would suggest paint the metal with say Vallejo black grey, or Revell anthricite, and apply a thinned lighter grey highlight to blend with the body grey.

The Parkside van moldings look v good. Nice models.

Steve.

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MarkS
Posts: 282
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2008 1:15 am

Re: Taking a brake...

Postby MarkS » Sun May 26, 2013 1:53 am

It has been a nice dry day here in Toronto, the airbrush was aroused by the beat of the compressor...
So, Russ - less clean now - better? (looks dirtier in real life, but then real life is like that innit?)
No.8.jpg
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Paul, The ironwork was painted too!
Steve, Vallejo Grey/black was used for the iron work.

For all - the weathering mix is about 75% water/thinner, 25% paint (black/grey,sienna,burnt umber,clear flat)
I "blue tacked" the lamp to the side, not sure where the S&D would have put it...
no.23.jpg
no.23.jpg (108.83 KiB) Viewed 5412 times


Nigel, this time I shook the box and out popped a Slaters 10 ton van - in Royal Navy dark grey...
Attachments
P1040646.JPG
P1040646.JPG (97.82 KiB) Viewed 5412 times
Cheers,

Mark.
"In the end, when all is said and done, more will have been said than done..."


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