A Highland Miscellany

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steve howe
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Re: A Highland Miscellany

Postby steve howe » Wed Jul 11, 2018 12:55 pm

Pinking shears! what an inspired idea!

I have a pre-War tea shack to build and this neatly solves the asbestos tile conundrum :D

thanks Mark :thumb

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Noel
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Re: A Highland Miscellany

Postby Noel » Wed Jul 11, 2018 4:42 pm

No, Mark, I don't know for certain what the colour was, I'm afraid. I'm going by long ago memories of corrugated asbestos sheeting, which, even when new, was a pale creamy grey, so the blue cast in the photos just didn't seem right to me, but I asked because the shop may have been roofed with something quite different in colour to what I remember [and memory is notoriously unreliable anyway...]

Just out of curiosity I Googled the pharmacy and found this 1930 image of the back (ironically, the image Google found is bigger) http://www.ambaile.org.uk/detail/en/11771/1/EN11771-kyle-pharmacy.htm.

Sorry, I don't seem to have been very helpful :?
Noel

Terry Bendall
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Re: A Highland Miscellany

Postby Terry Bendall » Wed Jul 11, 2018 9:12 pm

Mark Tatlow wrote:Do you know what colour they were


I can recall seeing asbestos slates used on building in Sussex which had a distinct dark pink tint to them, often used on timber clad bungalows. Sometimes almost a dark red but faded. Perhaps a regional thing or a different sort of asbestos?

Terry Bendall

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Noel
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Re: A Highland Miscellany

Postby Noel » Wed Jul 11, 2018 9:29 pm

Having had to give up on trying to make something work, at least until tomorrow :) , I found these two on Pinterest [which I detest, because everything is divorced from its context, but I didn't find the originals] with dates given of 1920s and 1962 respectively, which at least seem credible.
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/02/5a/b8/025ab8f867349a1fe8441ec08ef37e86.jpg
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/d1/a9/0f/d1a90f03b4d40f39292c4ed22dae977e.jpg

Assuming that the building and name colours didn't change substantially [big assumption, I know] I think the earlier one may be silver gelatin rather than orthochromatic film, hence the relatively dark grey roof. The colour photo presumably shows the result of 40+ years of weathering, into something like this
https://www.asbestosroofcleaning.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/IMG_0038.jpg
showing before and after steam cleaning. The lower four here
https://www.asbestosremovalists.co.uk/what-does-asbestos-look-like/ shows more examples, including a dark brown version, possibly a weathered dark pink as mentioned by Terry, but I think that the 1962 shot probably rules that out at Kyle. I assume you have seen some/all of these before, but I hope this helps.
Noel

John Palmer
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Re: A Highland Miscellany

Postby John Palmer » Thu Jul 12, 2018 7:56 am

From Historic Scotland: The Pattern of Scottish Roofing. Not available as a download that I have been able to trace, but available online at https://issuu.com/hspubs/docs/res_report_-_the_pattern_of_scottis. As a sourcebook on Scottish vernacular architecture, this comes close to my treasured 'Buildings of the Scottish Countryside' - indeed, in some ways better by virtue of the plethora of colour images. Asbestos diamonds illustrated and detailed at page 162, and appearing to have a very slight mauve cast.

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Noel
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Re: A Highland Miscellany

Postby Noel » Thu Jul 12, 2018 8:46 am

:thumb
The book page numbers and online page numbers are not matched, so look at online page 170 for the image John refers to. It also shows that the ridge material is unrelated to the slates [thin lead sheet?], which probably explains the differences in appearance in the 1962 image I posted.
Noel

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Mark Tatlow
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Re: A Highland Miscellany

Postby Mark Tatlow » Thu Jul 12, 2018 10:44 am

Thanks to John and Noel.

The book that John points us too is definitely helpful and will be bookmarked for future use. I have a couple of other Scottish vernacular architecture books which I will share details of when I get home over the weekend.

The asbestos slates shown on page 107 (scan)/162(book) are the type I am looking to create. Whilst I would say that the slates in this picture have faded a lot (as have these https://i.pinimg.com/originals/d1/a9/0f ... ae977e.jpg), I think I am taking the point that my colouring is too dark (the blue tinge I think is a bit more in the photograph reproduction). I feel a bit more colour washing coming on over the weekend!

Elsewhere in the book (including the frontspiece) has photographs of much larger slates that have the very reddish hue that Terry mentioned. As these things were man-made, I am guessing that each come from a different manufacturer and had a slightly different constituency.

The B&W photographs that Noel have found are known of (they were taken by Duncan MacPherson who was the owner of the Kyle Pharmacy and has was a well known photographer of the area). They have formed the basis of the model. Rights are retained by the Skye & Lochalsh Archive and they want £40 per image to reproduce them. Given that the Archive exists to record and share the history of the area, I felt they were seeking such a sum for someone who is only (frankly) playing trains. I thought I would retain the multiple £40s to spend on some worthy trader at Scaleforum instead!
Mark Tatlow

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Mark Tatlow
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Re: A Highland Miscellany - Cornish Modelling

Postby Mark Tatlow » Sun Sep 30, 2018 9:33 pm

Don’t worry – this is not announcement of being turned to the dark side of modelling “Green With Rivets” (aka the GWR)! Instead it is a reference to a week’s trip to the extreme west of Cornwall to support my wife who was appearing in a musical that was running for a week at the Minack Theatre – https://www.minack.com/

IMG_1183.JPG

As I was expecting to have a degree of time hanging around whilst the Mrs was on stage, I took a little modelling with me – in this case, a Jones era double deck sheep van. As can be seen in this George Washington Wilson photograph of Kyle – sheep traffic was an important source of traffic to the Highland Railway – the majority of the train in the platform are sheep vans and there is also a row of them in the foreground.

Kyle of Lochalsh 3 george washington wilson aberdeen uni archive.jpg

Ever with the eye to efficiency, the Highland developed a double deck van to double the number of sheep that could be transported in one vehicle. I believe that the Cambrian Railway and several railways in Ireland had similar vehicles, but otherwise these were characteristic of the Highland’s lines to the west coast and clearly I have to have a rake of them. Unfortunately, there is quite a lot of effort in each one………….for example each side below is made up of five layers of laminate (and they are delicate too)!!

IMG_1289 (2).JPG

The highland had several versions of these vans, this time I chose the second era of van, which has a single door and diagonal bracing; I do have plans for some of the other diagrams so this is a topic we will revisit at some point! The starting point for this vehicle was an etched kit from the Lochgorm range (presently unavailable, but we are all hoping……) and as already hinted, it is not an easy one! This is mostly due to the delicacy of the parts and the multi-layering of the etches that take up a lot of care to line up with each other. It takes a fair few hours simply to get the sides made up and ready for assembly and then you still have the metal bracing to do!

There were a number of elements to the kit that did not work for me. The various tabs you see in the above image are to help locate the various floors with each other but in practise they are not correctly located and just get in the way – so I whipped them off! I also ditched the compensated suspension and instead used spring suspension instead with some trusty Bill Bedford sprung units.

IMG_1290 (2).JPG

However, I did not spot the biggest problem until it was too late. There is an error with the design of the kit ends where one of them is missing the top gap between slats. The correct end is as per the top picture and had I have spotted this prior to the assembly of the ends, I would have been able to insert the additional gap with a piercing saw. Having missed the problem until after I had built the van, I decided not to sweat the parts apart to cut in the slat. It only shows to those that know it is wrong; the problem is that I am one of them so it does niggle!

IMG_1563 (2).JPG

IMG_1558 (2).JPG

Contrary to the instructions, I did not loose lay the floors in place and instead created a cage arrangement by hanging the floors from rods that were secured to the roof. As can be seen below, this enables the roof and the floors to be released from the interior of the van. This is necessary to both paint the vehicle but particularly populate it with the necessary sheep. You would be startled by how many sheep are required to fill one of these – around 50 and it costs a fair amount to populate each van. Thus, I have in mind casting some of my own in resin, although that is a story for another day.

IMG_2008 (2).JPG

The problems with the kit did not finish with the problems noted to date. The iron strapping was not quite right, the springs for the axleboxes are too big and the brake lever/shoe seemed excessively skinny. Thus, these were all adjusted or replaced with alternatives. All this effort and problems to solve meant that the van took a great deal longer to finish than the week that I had available – so it has taken until now to photograph it. This is what it looks like and rather dainty and different I think it is too!

IMG_1649 (2).JPG

And if anyone wants to see what the musical was like, here is a clip (with apologies for the rather shoddy photography which is me!)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8uMrxOWlYtU
Mark Tatlow

David Knight
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Re: A Highland Miscellany

Postby David Knight » Sun Sep 30, 2018 11:09 pm

Mark,

Fine looking vehicles (in both senses of the word). :thumb What would the braking system have been, manual, air or vacuum?

Cheers,

David

DougN
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Re: A Highland Miscellany

Postby DougN » Mon Oct 01, 2018 7:21 am

Mark, as Australia rode on the back of a sheep for a large part of its economic history the State railways had similar wagons. The Victorian in both senses of the word had the "L" wagons for sheep. Later they developed the LL wagons... which it has been joked the lambs and lots of lambs wagons! ;)
Doug
Still not doing enough modelling

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Mark Tatlow
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Re: A Highland Miscellany

Postby Mark Tatlow » Mon Oct 01, 2018 7:51 am

David Knight wrote:Mark,

Fine looking vehicles (in both senses of the word). :thumb What would the braking system have been, manual, air or vacuum?

Cheers,

David


A manual scotch brake actuating on one side to one wheel only.

Scotch brakes are simple levers, whereby the action of the brake lever is transmitted to a shoe that bears on the wheel. These bolsters in the Wizard range show what they were like. https://www.wizardmodels.ltd/shop/wagons/hrd036/

So well short of vacuum brakes!



PS - just had a panic looking at the photo prior to responding - I have missed some end straps. Something to add tonight.
Mark Tatlow

Paulhb
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Re: A Highland Miscellany

Postby Paulhb » Mon Oct 01, 2018 10:13 am

Hi Mark,

Very nice.

Have attached a couple of pictures of the earlier Jones Diagram 9 Sheep van. Not the quickest kit in the world an certainly is a good soldering test.


IMG_1807.jpg
IMG_1807.jpg (90.67 KiB) Viewed 258 times
IMG_1808.jpg
IMG_1808.jpg (89.99 KiB) Viewed 258 times


Regards

Paul Bannerman


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