Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Tell us about your layout, where you put it, how you built it, how you operate it.
Philip Hall
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Philip Hall » Fri Aug 03, 2018 10:26 pm

Tony, this has been interesting for me as one of my awkward boards has been across the access door. It’s quite long and laid on a 4’6” minimum curve throughout. The problem has been that a flap in its up position would obstruct the doorway too much, whichever side it is hinged. The single doorway is extra wide as an alternative to double doors.

The eventual solution is going to be a lift out section, able to be swung around on the adjoining baseboard/workbench surface for storage. In practice during a running session we will be able to ‘duck under’, at least until advancing years renders that unwise. It also has the advantage of not relying on the hinges for alignment; I was a little worried that with trains crossing the flap at a scale 60 or so any slight alignment glitch would result in a minor disaster 3’9” from the floor. With this system I am going to use dowels and sliding bolts, but additionally the new Peco bullhead fishplates slid across the joints. Belt and braces you may say but we shall see.

Such are the perils of wanting a continuous run...

Philip

Terry Bendall
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Terry Bendall » Sat Aug 04, 2018 8:49 am

Tony Wilkins wrote:The result was this. It is remarkably solid considering what the individual layers are like. The edges required some sanding but little else.I was pleasantly surprised how effective this method was proving that simple methods can be very effective.


The technique is known as laminating and is well know amongst woodworkers as a way of making curved parts. One tip about the plywood is to make sure it is cut the right way. Plywood is made of thin sheets of wood called veneer with the grain of the wood laid in alternate directions for each layer. When cutting the strips, the grain on the outside layers needs to run vertically across the strips. This will make them easier to bend. For curved parts with a sharp radius 1.5mm thick plywood is very useful but for this sort of application 3mm thick is ideal.

Tony's use of panel pins as the former has worked well in this case although it is more usual to make some sort of wooden former. Making sure that there is pressure over all the layers of ply whilst the glue dries is important.

Tony Wilkins wrote:The underside of the lifting flap had a dowel fitted in the centre, this was the easy bit.


A very simple but effective way of getting things to line up.

Terry Bendall

Tony Wilkins
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Tony Wilkins » Sat Aug 04, 2018 4:17 pm

Hi Richard.
My comment "I must admit that the possibility of public failure also still exists" wasn't specifically directed at having to modify the lifting flap design specifically. (Been looking at it today and found a miscalculation.) It was more a general comment regarding doing anything in the public arena. Egg on face is always a possibility.
Regards
Tony.
Last edited by Tony Wilkins on Tue Aug 28, 2018 9:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Tony Wilkins
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Tony Wilkins » Sat Aug 04, 2018 4:37 pm

Hi Philip.
Your point about the alignment of hinges is well made. The ones I chose came from a box of them inherited from my Father and seem to be of reasonable quality. There is no detectable play that I could see, indeed the pins took a bit of getting out to begin with. I also wanted the option of being able to remove the lifting flap completely if needed. My operating plan is to duck under most of the time we are running, but in between sessions and in dire need the flap can be raised. The baseboards will eventually have raised safety edges that can double as back scenes.
Regards
Tony.

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Andrew Bluett-Duncan
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Andrew Bluett-Duncan » Wed Aug 29, 2018 9:25 pm

Hello Tony

I’ve now read this treatise on making beautiful trackwork and adventurous wood work, from start to finish and I must say I admire the thought and planning that you’ve put into it and when problems occur, your approach to solving them. You’ve gone to a great deal of trouble to show us exactly how you approach things and importantly what you do to solve problems when things go wrong. The latter point Is especially useful.

So speaking as a 00 and more recently EM modeller I doubt I’ll ever have the time or skills to build a P4 layout, but I do love the look of P4 trackwork through point and crossing work and the smoothness with which it runs and your work is a truly great example of this. So thanks very much for the diary you’re keeping of it all. A real inspiration.

Kind regards
Andrew

Tony Wilkins
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Tony Wilkins » Fri Aug 31, 2018 10:30 pm

Hello Andrew.
Thanks for your encouraging words. It is always nice when ones efforts are appreciated.
The world of model railways often seems to be a small one. It was not an easy decision whether to post this thread here or on the Templot forum. It is probable that some subjects will be more suited to the Templot forum along with suitable links.

There has been some progress of late. One of the problems I have encountered was due to the long girders under the straight baseboards. Reaching the far side bolts that link the baseboards together proved rather difficult. The decision was taken so time back, to use some of the half hinges that joined the original baseboards together for just this purpose, to link the far side of the storage yard baseboards together from above where they are against the wall. The problem was that I had run out of recovered Brass screws as I had used them with the dowels. These were ordered, but I had to wait nearly a week for them to come.
I needed to put all the baseboards together to determine accurately the size of the last baseboard. This is a bit of a slow process as some of the most recent baseboards needed to be assembled in pairs and sanded to fit. As I went each pair were bolted together and when the fit was approved, a hinge was fitted to each outer joint.
DSCF0699.jpg

DSCF0705.jpg

The baseboard alignment is not dependant on the hinges, the dowels taking care of that, so all the hinges do is hold the boards together. Mind you, I am now finding that a few of the hinges seem to have moved slightly with the boards apart. Enough that the hinge pin barrels do not quite line up when I subsequently tried to put them together, so some remedial work will be needed. Hey ho.
Tony.

Terry Bendall
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Terry Bendall » Sat Sep 01, 2018 9:30 am

Tony Wilkins wrote:I am now finding that a few of the hinges seem to have moved slightly with the boards apart


Tony

Tightening up the screws might make a difference and replacing the slotted screws with ones with a Pozidrive head would probably allow them to be done up tighter, especially if a battery powered drill is used.

Some additional holes for extra screws might help, and try to make the diameter of the hole and the countersink match the diameter of the screw and head. Another tip is to use a countersink bit to reform the countersinks in the hinges which are often not of the same angle or deep enough to take the heads of the screws.

Countersunk machine screws with nuts on the inside is another solution although probably the corner blocks will get in the way, unless you can find some long screws or use studding with nuts on each end.

Another possible solution which might work would be to drill two new holes in the hinges and then into the sides of the board and glue a hexagon head bolt in the hole using Araldite or similar.

Tony Wilkins wrote:Enough that the hinge pin barrels do not quite line up


If you can get a drill in position and have one that is long enough, then drilling through the barrels with the boards together and clamped may solve the problem. Alternatively, beg, borrow, steal or even buy a reamer that is long enough to go all the way through and then fit new pins made of silver steel. Probably extra long drills or reamers would be needed and the cost may make this idea out of the question. Another alternative would be to make a home made flat drill from silver steel and grind it to the correct size but that needs some skills that are not often found.

Terry Bendall

Tony Wilkins
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Tony Wilkins » Sat Sep 01, 2018 1:33 pm

Hi Terry.
Thanks for the advise and tips. The problem I have with some of the screws is that I stand a good chance of stripping the threads (as has already occurred with several) if I attempt to tighten them up too much more. Some of the packing pieces had paper or card layers as well so it looks as though Chris had found the same problem, although he relied entirely on the hinges for alignment. In part I think the problem is down to the edges of adjacent boards not being dead in line, thus producing a slight step here. I shall try some packing first of all as I think this may be the simplest option. At least I didn't glue anything together as Chris did.
Regards
Tony.

Tony Wilkins
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Tony Wilkins » Sun Sep 02, 2018 11:17 pm

Investigation of the difficult joint revealed the following.
DSCF0710.jpg

Note how out of line the edges of the baseboards are, so I am not surprised there was a problem, I wonder in retrospect, how it went together in the first place.
Replacing one with a thicker piece of packing has cured the problem.
DSCF0711.jpg

Whilst I had the baseboards out, the opportunity was taken to improve the fit of some of the worst joints, sanding down high spots and sorting out gaps in the top surface. I have also done quite a lot of sanding out bumps in the top plane of the Sundeala board as well.
Several of the remaining curved end boards have had their Sundeala top surfaces cut and glued. Am now into my third litre of wood glue.
DSCF0697.jpg

I don't see the point of a blow by blow account as I think most people will have got the idea by now. Suffice to say that the 4 section board that I had so much trouble with earlier again proved troublesome when I checked the top surface for flatness, it wasn't. A considerable amount of planing and sanding being required to make it so.
The next thing that I needed was some legs to support the curved end boards as these are not supported by the T girder system. A hollow box section was fabricated out of spare 6mm MDF and 18mm ply offcuts. One MDF piece is longer and fits inside one end of the a baseboard.
The 9mm thick strip of ply glued to the inside face takes the weight of the baseboard. The 4 pieces of 18mm ply placed on the top are there to show the internal construction.
DSCF0707.jpg

I kept the legs that originally came with Chris's baseboards. Now it was time to use some of them. The first set I chose had the shortest length, which seemed suitable. I needed to reduce the overall width. They were spaced apart with plywood sheet screwed to the uprights, fortunately not glued this time.
Each set of legs needed to match the width of their respective baseboard end. After careful measurement, both pieces of ply were cut down and the legs reassembled. A piece of 18mm ply was then cut to fit in between the top of the legs and the length protruding above the legs cut down to fit into the box section created earlier. This was then screwed into place.
DSCF0704.jpg

DSCF0703.jpg

Similarly legs were made for the other two curved end boards I had made thus far.
DSCF0701.jpg

The screw in feet were fitted to the box sections and test fitted to their respective legs. Some sanding was required in places to achieve a good sliding fit.
DSCF0708.jpg

The object of all this is to have the adjustment at waist height.
DSCF0709.jpg

The problem I had next was that to be able to place the next baseboards on position, I needed to use the last set of T girders to support the last pair of straight storage yard baseboards. I have been using the T girders to support pairs of baseboards whilst I sort out any joint problems. However, these need to go where my designated flat area is that I use for assembling baseboards. I still have one baseboard to make, but I need to assemble all the others first to check that it will fit before I make it. Catch 22.
DSCF0713.jpg

I also needed to shift my work desk from where it resides and rearrange things somewhat.
I fear the long threatened great clear up cometh.

Terry Bendall
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Terry Bendall » Mon Sep 03, 2018 7:20 am

Tony Wilkins wrote:The problem I have with some of the screws is that I stand a good chance of stripping the threads


Two possible solutions to this problem. Drill out the hole in the baseboard side and glue in a piece of wooden dowel. The refit the screw, drilling a pilot hole first for the screw. If more than one hole needs this do one at a time so the pilot hole lines up with the hole in the hinge. Alternatively drill out the hole and fit a plastic wall plug fixed with a suitable adhesive.

Terry Bendall

Tony Wilkins
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Tony Wilkins » Mon Sep 03, 2018 7:45 am

Hi Terry.
A third option is wooden cocktail sticks, which worked wonders. Shorten the pointed end, insert into hole and snap off. Reinsert screw. I have used plastic wall plugs in the past though if that didn't work.
Well this is where we are now. I dare not show a picture of the view behind me. Still much sorting out and tidying to do followed by a trip to the local tip.
DSCF0714.jpg

This was a trial fit and was most encouraging.
DSCF0716.jpg

Checking across the gap, all appeared level. A couple of the baseboards were removed as the ends required some sanding down.
On reassembly things didn't seem quite so level and on measuring the gap there were notable differences between my list and reality.
I measured the distance over the parallel baseboards and discovered a variation of 20mm from end to end. I calculated the error as being 0.19 degrees. A few gentle tweaks of the the scenic boards restored parallelism and on remeasuring the gap the dimensions were much closer to those expected.
All I have to do now is make it and I will, all but two years in, have a full circuit at last. That may not happen this side of Scaleforum, but we will see.
Tony.
Last edited by Tony Wilkins on Fri Sep 14, 2018 10:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Tony Wilkins
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Tony Wilkins » Thu Sep 06, 2018 4:30 pm

I suppose it was inevitable that I could only stand looking at that gap for so long.
As I had already cut some of the required parts when making bits for previous boards the temptation to assemble them won out.
A trial dry fit was then made showing some discrepancies between theory and fact. After due consideration the flap end of the side lengths were remarked and with some trepidation, cut to length. Then followed the first trial fitting, using numerous clamps to hold things together.
DSCF0717.jpg

DSCF0718.jpg

These are the offcuts and show the difference between fact and theory. The top board is the outside edge and the bottom one the inside edge.
DSCF0719.jpg

A sheet of plywood was placed on top of the baseboard frame and the sides marked on it in pencil to form a template. The baseboard was then removed and placed upside down on top if it. Panel pins again being used to hold the curvature in place.
DSCF0720.jpg

DSCF0721.jpg

Diagonals were then fabricated.
DSCF0722.jpg

Since then the joints have been separated and glued together with the exception of the left hand end piece and diagonal as I want to do a final fit before committing myself [EDIT] and I am now well and truly committed!
DSCF0725.jpg

The moment of truth and It fits!
DSCF0724.jpg

Tony.

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Colin Parks
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Colin Parks » Sun Sep 09, 2018 1:23 pm

Hello Tony,

That all seems very complicated, but you have come around the full curcuit of boards with a remarkable degree of accuracy by the looks of it. In the picture of the boards which cover your designated 'flat area', is that going to be the fiddle yard side? Perhaps in due course, you will move the shelf above to avoid anything falling on the stock below. (Speaking from experience!)

Track laying must surely follow soon...

All the best,

Colin

Tony Wilkins
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Tony Wilkins » Sun Sep 09, 2018 9:12 pm

Colin Parks wrote:Hello Tony,

That all seems very complicated, but you have come around the full circuit of boards with a remarkable degree of accuracy by the looks of it. In the picture of the boards which cover your designated 'flat area', is that going to be the fiddle yard side? Perhaps in due course, you will move the shelf above to avoid anything falling on the stock below. (Speaking from experience!)

Track laying must surely follow soon...

All the best,

Colin

Hi Colin.
I don't think there is any doubt about it, it is an overly complicated arrangement, necessitated by needing a reasonably wide opening through the doorway. I would much rather things had been simpler, but could not make the lifting flap any longer as there is pointwork either side of the joint. I had hoped to get away with it, but when I first tried the flap for size, it became apparent that the gap at the inside edge of the baseboards left something to be desired. Therefore the flap design evolved into what it is now.
The final result is not as accurate as I would have liked /hoped, the last board being approximatively an inch short and at slightly different angles to the Templot plan in order to fit and some of the trackwork will have to be re-jigged as a result. The precise cause is difficult to ascertain although I suspect much of it is down to not having a truly rectangular building to begin with. Although the straight boards appear to be parallel from measurements, there is not as much space between their outer edges and the walls as there should be toward the door end, but the fancy shapes of the curved boards are an additional complication. The only other way to make curved baseboards is by jig building and making them all the same, but I didn't want to do that. I am aware that it is possible to get boards laser cut these days (for a price), but I have a horrible feeling that if I had gone down that route, I may now be looking at a set of baseboards that would not physically fit in the width I have.
You are right about the shelves. I have already been giving serious thought to some aspects of this. One would have thought that with all that new cupboard space that there would be plenty of storage space without the shelves now, but they seem to have filled up already. Hence the need for a major sort out, which has already begun (slowly). I will come back to your fiddle yard query shortly.
Tony.

Tony Wilkins
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Tony Wilkins » Sun Sep 09, 2018 9:59 pm

To bring this stage to some sort of conclusion, here is the result of the last day or so's progress. The top sheet of Sundeala was cut out and glued down yesterday evening and left to set overnight. Today it has been sanded down to the edges of the baseboard frame. It is funny how one sometimes has a flash of inspiration when one has almost finished a job. Sanding the inner curve is much easier with the sandpaper put on the back of the sanding block.
DSCF0727.jpg

DSCF0728.jpg

Because of the peculiar nature of what I wanted to achieve, a novel approach was required. I decided that a set of paste board table hinges could work. I would have liked something of better quality, but there seems to be little choice.
The edges were built up by two inches and an additional layer glued on top before the hinges were fitted
DSCF0729.jpg

and here is the result when out of use.
DSCF0730.jpg

The fit of the lifting flap is not 100% yet, so some minor fettling still needed, but the surface is flat and level when fully down, so almost there.
I now have Scaleforum to prepare for as I shall be looking after the NAG test track for the weekend and there are still other non hobby jobs I have been putting off.
To answer Colin's query about the fiddle yards extent I will post the box file. I warn you, it is big. Draw a horizontal line across the centre at Y = 1800mm. Everything above this line is non-scenic.
brimsdown_2018_06_15_1654_23.box
(4.96 MiB) Downloaded 44 times

The next major task will be gluing the cork sheet down before the track laying starts, but there is still more baseboard sanding to do before that as there are still several minor humps and hollows to deal with first.
Tony.

Tony Wilkins
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Tony Wilkins » Mon Sep 10, 2018 10:39 am

To see the full effect, you will need to go to the Templot forum to be able to download the background shapes.
http://85a.co.uk/forum/view_topic.php?i ... orum_id=12
Regards
Tony.

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Colin Parks
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Colin Parks » Mon Sep 10, 2018 4:15 pm

Hello Tony,
Thanks for posting your Templot plan. I will have look at it later. The fact that you are only 1" out on the dimensions of such a large project seems quite acceptable. There is that person up in Scotland modelling Kings Cross and in an article he said the builders had made the internal space 6" narrower than specified. That did call for major re-alignment of the tracks.

All the best,

Colin

Philip Hall
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Philip Hall » Mon Sep 10, 2018 4:45 pm

Tony,

You have chosen Sundeala as a surface. I am looking at a softboard surface, laid on top of a Contiboard base, for the scenic parts of the railway. Could you suggest a supplier for the board you use please?

Philip

Tony Wilkins
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Tony Wilkins » Tue Sep 11, 2018 9:21 am

Colin Parks wrote:Hello Tony,
Thanks for posting your Templot plan. I will have look at it later. The fact that you are only 1" out on the dimensions of such a large project seems quite acceptable. There is that person up in Scotland modelling Kings Cross and in an article he said the builders had made the internal space 6" narrower than specified. That did call for major re-alignment of the tracks.

All the best,

Colin

Hi Colin.
I measured the internal dimensions of the building as it stood, so should have been right, however this was at head height where the cross girders were. These were all the same nominal dimension. This does not guarantee that the walls were the same width apart at baseboard height, but the difference should not be that great. What I have had to allow for is surface mounted things such as wiring and the door frame. My suspicion is that with the problems I had with the first large curved baseboard, there are still minor dimensional errors and this has thrown the whole end curve out enough to produce the resultant difference.
Tony.

Tony Wilkins
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Tony Wilkins » Tue Sep 11, 2018 9:29 am

Philip Hall wrote:Tony,

You have chosen Sundeala as a surface. I am looking at a softboard surface, laid on top of a Contiboard base, for the scenic parts of the railway. Could you suggest a supplier for the board you use please?

Philip


Hi Philip.
I obtained my Sundeala from Ashford Model supply centre, but it appears they are no longer trading, so not sure what to suggest.
Sundeala's own website lists their supply outlets but as these are mainly timber merchants generally stock 8 x 4 sheets, which is why I didn't use them as I find sheets this large difficult to handle.
I am considering foam board for removable scenic sections.
Regards
Tony.

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Martin Wynne
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Martin Wynne » Tue Sep 11, 2018 9:47 am

Tony Wilkins wrote:I obtained my Sundeala from Ashford Model supply centre, but it appears they are no longer trading, so not sure what to suggest.

Hi Tony, Philip,

Cut sizes of Sundeala available delivered from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sundeala-Board ... 018IPZC8S/

I don't know how the prices compare with local builders' merchants (most of which will cut sheets for you).

Martin.
40 years developing Templot. And counting ...

Tony Wilkins
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Tony Wilkins » Mon Oct 15, 2018 10:54 pm

After the recent break for several reasons, I have began to make progress again. There has been some sorting out achieved although this is still ongoing. Further sanding of baseboard tops to improve levels has been done. The main focus now is on fitting the layer of cork to the storage siding boards. This is nominally the 'easy' part as the boards are nominally flat and completely covered with cork, unlike the scenic boards, which will require ballast shoulders to the trackbed edges. This is going to be a slow process as I can only realistically glue one board a day.
Two (or more) pieces of 1/8th cork sheet are pre-cut just oversize for each baseboard.
I began by applying the PVA glue to the underside of the cork and then turning the cork sheet over before placing on the baseboard surface, then press and smooth the cork down into place making sure any air pockets are expelled. The main problem with this approach turned out to be the strength of the cork sheet as there is a tendency for the cork to tear if too much strain is placed upon it. There is also the problem that the Sundeala board is quite absorbent so the glue soaks into the surface leaving a dry joint.
I have now relented and glue the baseboard top surface thoroughly but thinly first and then the underside edges of the cork to ensure a good glue joint. One has to work quickly spreading the glue, which is more akin the wallpaper hanging than woodwork. The PVA glue I used was a mix of two lots I have. One is too thin and the other too thick, but when mixed in equal quantities works out about right. They are mixed and stirred in a 500ml jar (just visible to the left of the picture) then gently poured onto the baseboard surface and spread with a 2" brush making sure there is an even coating right up to the edge of the board. Each 4' x 2' board uses over half a jar full so needs to be topped up each time.
Not very exciting stuff I know, but here are a couple of pictures of progress.
DSCF2259.jpg

After the glue has dried any excess cork is gently sanded off.
It is important to hold the cork sheet firmly down while things set. I use an off cut of kitchen worktop upside down as this is suitably flat and heavy and the plastic surface is less likely to stick to any surplus glue than the bare wood side.
DSCF2260.jpg

Regards
Tony.

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Andrew Bluett-Duncan
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Andrew Bluett-Duncan » Fri Nov 16, 2018 2:13 pm

Hello Tony
Not scintillating maybe but necessary and you're doing it with your customary methodical and detailed approach which is always good to see. Ive never thought of using an off cut of work top for this purpose!

So whats next...?
Kind regards
Andrew

Tony Wilkins
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Tony Wilkins » Tue Nov 27, 2018 11:45 am

For those of you who are getting withdrawal symptoms, I thought I had better post an update as it has been a while.
Having finally assembled a complete circuit of baseboards it was a bit of a pain to have to dismantle large chunks of it, but needs must, as baseboards need to be moved around for access.
DSCF0735.jpg

After gluing what seems like acres of cork for the storage yard boards and this one would come back to haunt me later,
DSCF0731.jpg


I decided to turn my attention to the scenic part of the layout. This is different as only the area under the trackbed need corking.
The jar contains the PVA glue used to stick down the cork. This is applied with a 1 or 2 inch paintbrush.
DSCF0732.jpg

I suppose it was inevitable that I would then wish to place some track on it, if only temporarily. This is the head shunt of the Enfield Cable Company sidings behind the station, which I decided to concentrate on first.
DSCF0734.jpg

Cork gluing continuing apace.
DSCF0737.jpg

The strips of cork slightly overlap the edges of the baseboards and are sanded back once dry to achieve a close join.

And inevitably!
DSCF0738.jpg

Having glued down all the cork for the ECC sidings I next tackled the crossover at the far end. This was the first piece of trackwork I built for Brimsdown back in November 2009, so it has only taken 9 years to lay it.
DSCF0739.jpg

DSCF0741.jpg

DSCF0742.jpg

DSCF0743.jpg

It has then been a question of infilling the track in between these two ends with the following result.
DSCF0765.jpg

DSCF0766.jpg

DSCF0767.jpg


Meanwhile progress has also been made with the storage sidings.
Whilst it may look impressive, thus far only the nearest two roads plus the length under the lead weights have been stuck down, the rest has not, yet.
DSCF0745.jpg

DSCF0769.jpg

DSCF0770.jpg

Just to add an element of confusion the storage yard boards are inside out, well outside in actually, as I wanted to do the outer roads first and there was no way I could reach them easily at the back of the baseboards.
Tony.

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Serjt-Dave
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Re: Brimsdown-The last grand project.

Postby Serjt-Dave » Wed Nov 28, 2018 8:31 am

It's people like you who make me realise how far behind I'm getting with my layout. LOL. Well I suppose with all this activity you'll get yours finished by the weekend and then you can come round and help with my one. Cracking work there Tony.

Looking at your images, I notice a stack of made up track panels. Are you laying your plain track in panels even in the fiddle yard?

All Best

Dave


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