Brettell Road

Tell us about your layout, where you put it, how you built it, how you operate it.
Trevor Grout
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby Trevor Grout » Thu Jan 19, 2017 11:04 pm

Rear view. Some Kirtleys had a simple weather hood to protect the crew. It stretched from the cab roof to the tender front. Anyone got any thoughts on how to replicate this? It will need to be flexible.[/quote]

Jim,

What about a small rectangle of Silk, maybe cut from a shirt in a shop that does such things :o not that I am advocating such vandalism in any way shape or form.........

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James Wells
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby James Wells » Fri Jan 20, 2017 4:47 pm

jim s-w wrote:Some Kirtleys had a simple weather hood to protect the crew. It stretched from the cab roof to the tender front. Anyone got any thoughts on how to replicate this? It will need to be flexible.


If you can find a cloth material with a very fine structure, than might work or if you can find a thin black rubber/latex I imagine this could be adapted. Though for the latter all I can think of is material from some form of novelty condom...!

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Jol Wilkinson
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby Jol Wilkinson » Fri Jan 20, 2017 4:56 pm

LRM have an etched MR 700 in the pipeline but have been rather let down by the designer (I shan't name names but he isn't a member of the S4 Society) who has been delinquent in correcting the final test etch minor errors. However it should be available this year (which gives plenty of leeway!)

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jim s-w
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby jim s-w » Fri Jan 20, 2017 6:33 pm

a quick video of the inside motion


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Le Corbusier
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby Le Corbusier » Sat Jan 21, 2017 9:44 am

jim s-w wrote:Image

My Kirtley project has reached the stage that its ready for primer. Buffers are from Lanarkshire models whilst the whistle and safety valves are from Markits. I've replaced the steps and cab roof with brass.

Image

Rear view. Some Kirtleys had a simple weather hood to protect the crew. It stretched from the cab roof to the tender front. Anyone got any thoughts on how to replicate this? It will need to be flexible.


Jim,

This is looking lovely. For beginners like myself this sort of posting is gold dust. Some great tips and something to aspire to. I look forward to seeing it back from the paint shop.

Tim
Tim Lee

Andrew Ullyott
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby Andrew Ullyott » Sat Jan 21, 2017 11:51 am

That's looking very nice Jim. Whilst I do like a 'state of the art' etched brass kit, I think there's a real sense of satisfaction when turning an older kit or model into something special as you've done.

andrewnummelin
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby andrewnummelin » Sat Jan 21, 2017 6:14 pm

jim s-w wrote:a quick video of the inside motion


Sickening..... makes me think I'd be better switching to gardening!
I've had a go a two outside framed locos and made a mess of both chassis, the third one planned was also intended to have inside motion - now I know what I have to aim for!

I'm curious - what is the width over the crank pin nuts? My two attempts were both out of gauge.

I believe you are making a stunning model of a delightful prototype and I'm thoroughly enjoying reading about, and now watching, it.
Regards,

Andrew Nummelin

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jim s-w
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby jim s-w » Wed Jan 25, 2017 5:31 pm

There's still a bit of work to do on the Kirtley - add a crew and the weather sheet, some coal and the wet weather effect but its pretty much done. Below are a few pictures.

Image

Image

Image

I have been doing a few wagons as an aside to the soldering iron.

Image
Another lowfit from Red Panda. This one has a Parkside chassis and buffers from my supply. I don't know who made them or what type they are but they matched some of the pictures on Paul Bartletts wagon site Thanks to my friend Brendan for the lowfit transfers.

Image
The Dapol lowmac kit. Reworked with Lanarkshire models buffers, archers rivets and new axleboxes from the spares box. The brake lever is an etch and the ratchetey looking guide is from a piercing saw blade. This wagon is really too long to be rigid and there's not a lot of room for any sort of springing or compensation units so the solution here (which I remember from a P4 society digest sheet years ago) is to file the bearings into a slot and use a bit of scrap etch in the centre of the axle to allow it to rock.

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Le Corbusier
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby Le Corbusier » Wed Jan 25, 2017 6:01 pm

jim s-w wrote:There's still a bit of work to do on the Kirtley - add a crew and the weather sheet, some coal and the wet weather effect but its pretty much done. Below are a few pictures.

Image


Jim ...to my eye it looks fantastic .... all it needs now is full Crimson Lake livery :thumb

Is it possible to see the working inside motion?

Tim
Tim Lee

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jim s-w
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby jim s-w » Wed Jan 25, 2017 6:08 pm

Thanks tim

You can see movement between the first 2 axles yes.

Jim

Armchair Modeller
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby Armchair Modeller » Wed Jan 25, 2017 10:49 pm

The job you have done on the Kirtley is really inspirational. Great job :thumb

Philip Hall
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby Philip Hall » Thu Jan 26, 2017 3:58 pm

A lovely job, Jim. I do like the colour and the fact that it's not dead matt, something that to me takes a little bit of life from a model. I look forward to seeing the wet effect.

I doubt I shall ever revisit the earlier Kirtley, but if I did, I would have to go some to match your engine. Congratulations.

Philip

garethashenden
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby garethashenden » Thu Jan 26, 2017 4:15 pm

Do you have a picture of the bearing slots on the lowmak?

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Colin Parks
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby Colin Parks » Thu Jan 26, 2017 8:26 pm

Hi Jim,

Like the Lowmac. Those old mouldings scrub up well with a little judicious fettling and thinning of edges. Did you deepen the side frame below the brake lever pivot point? It looks as though you might have. It just awaits the obligatory JCB as a load now!

Colin

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jim s-w
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby jim s-w » Thu Jan 26, 2017 10:05 pm

Thanks all

I did take a pic of the underside of the lowmac but it was blurred (one day I'll learn to take 2 of everything!) I'll take another one.

I did deepen the sideframe Colin, well spotted

Jim

Philip Hall
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby Philip Hall » Fri Jan 27, 2017 3:46 am

My solution for a rocking axle on low slung vehicles (well it has worked on Cambrian GW sleeper and machinery wagons) has been to use a MJT inside bearing rocking unit, but breaking off the bearing carriers at the half etch mark and taking as much as I can off the carrier at the bottom and soldering it back on to the base. This gives a millimetre or two extra clearance. It's not necessary to get both sides of the carrier an equal height as the axle will still sit level on the track.

Philip

Phil O
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby Phil O » Sat Jan 28, 2017 7:41 pm

Jim,

I have seen a weather sheet modelled, but unfortunately, I can't remember any details.

Phil

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Penrhos1920
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby Penrhos1920 » Tue Jan 31, 2017 10:53 pm

jim s-w wrote:Image
The Dapol lowmac kit. Reworked with Lanarkshire models buffers, archers rivets and new axleboxes from the spares box. The brake lever is an etch and the ratchetey looking guide is from a piercing saw blade. This wagon is really too long to be rigid and there's not a lot of room for any sort of springing or compensation units so the solution here (which I remember from a P4 society digest sheet years ago) is to file the bearings into a slot and use a bit of scrap etch in the centre of the axle to allow it to rock.



Oh the wind must have changed direction. Over on another thread you send it is perfectly acceptable to run rigid long wheelbase wagons in P4. Or has something happened??
Getting it Alright

Penrhos Junctions near Caerphilly - Barry Rly, Rhymney Rly and A(N&SW)D&R 1920 and pseudo modern image in S4F
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Awrhyllgwami for DEMU challenge
and
Dispelling the P4 drop in wheel myth
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TOERAG Obergruppenführer

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jim s-w
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby jim s-w » Wed Feb 01, 2017 7:12 am

I've said many times "Anything bigger than a grampus is my rule. Smaller doesn't need it." For RTR you can go bigger and there's 2 rakes of rigid HEAs happily running on Calcutta sidings. If it the thread I'm thinking of the discussion was about modern diesels wasn't it? Like I said over there, just because you can't get it to work doesn't mean it's a myth.

Has something happened is a very valid question, I don't recall you being this miserable in the past. What has happened?

Cheers

Jim

dal-t
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby dal-t » Wed Feb 01, 2017 9:45 am

Jim,

I'm surprised no-one has offered you better advice on the weathersheet yet. I've modelled them in the past, since most pre-Grouping designs that survived to Grouping or Nationalisation had acquired them, but I've always gone for the easy option of rolled up on the half-roof. As they were usually only deployed when running in reverse that worked fine for me, but obviously for your 'rainy day' scenario you want it extended. I know somewhere in my reference material there's a couple of photos showing spread out sheets, but quick searches of my library have failed to find them (more extensive searches are a bit difficult at the moment, the house is currently controlled by a new puppy!). Best suggestion I can make is if you have any 'Railways in Wartime' books, check them for shots of blackout sheets. Some were a bit more elaborate than the original weathersheets, particularly in having side-wings to make the blackout complete, but they will give a good idea of the fixings on the cab roof, ties to the tender or rear plate, and how the tarpaulin draped (usually pretty loose). HTH.

David
David L-T

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jim s-w
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby jim s-w » Thu Feb 02, 2017 5:12 pm

Thanks David

I've got a colour book (can't recall the title at the mo) that shows quite a few pictures of them (in stored position) they seem to be a cool grey colour. Good idea on the blackout screens, I'll have a look.

Jim

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Noel
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby Noel » Thu Feb 02, 2017 5:46 pm

I don't know, but suspect that, given the technology available at the time, they were made the same way as wagon sheets. These were canvas, weather proofed with a mixture of boiled linseed oil and carbon black, so were virtually black when new, but subject to dirt and possibly some fading after being in use for a while.
Regards
Noel

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PeteT
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby PeteT » Thu Feb 02, 2017 5:51 pm

Phil O wrote:Jim,

I have seen a weather sheet modelled, but unfortunately, I can't remember any details.

Phil


Gerry Beale has done them, which from memory he said was done with 0.4mm pewter sheet (though at a glance I could only see 0.1mm or 0.6mm on ebay). This was modelled rolled up on the roof rather than in use, but the pewter is malleable and definitely looks the part as Gerry has done it.

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Will L
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby Will L » Thu Feb 02, 2017 6:20 pm

If you want to model the weather sheet in position between loco and tender, the problem, surely, is going to be to find something flexible enough not to interfere with the movement between the two and yet hang anything like the prototype. Could be tricky, I wish you luck with that. (You could try a bit of fine surgical latex glove, but you'd have to replace it quite often)?

David Knight
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Re: Brettell Road

Postby David Knight » Thu Feb 02, 2017 8:39 pm

FWIW, I remember reading on one forum or another that Gore-Tex has the virtue of being very thin and flexible. If you can find a garment that is past its prime it might be worth a try.

HTH

David


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