The Burford Branch

Tell us about your layout, where you put it, how you built it, how you operate it.
martin goodall
Posts: 1093
Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 6:20 pm

Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Mon Aug 10, 2020 11:29 am

philip-griffiths wrote: I should also now ask for a degree in Ikea assembly....


I think we would all qualify for a degree (or at least a post-graduate diploma) in self-assembly furniture of various different makes! Fortunately, there was nothing of that sort this time, but when it comes to the main house move, probably next year, there's a large and awkward wardrobe to be taken apart and re-assembled. My wife and I still bear the scars of previous tussles with this piece of furniture, although we are now familiar with its faults and foibles.

Paul Hutfield
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Aug 01, 2008 11:34 pm

Re: The Burford Branch

Postby Paul Hutfield » Mon Aug 10, 2020 12:30 pm

Pleased to hear the move went well and that Burford has safely arrived in its new home. Looking forward to the reassembly in the near future.

Best Wishes

Paul

philip-griffiths
Posts: 112
Joined: Wed Aug 18, 2010 9:44 pm

Re: The Burford Branch

Postby philip-griffiths » Mon Aug 10, 2020 6:32 pm

martin goodall wrote:
philip-griffiths wrote: I should also now ask for a degree in Ikea assembly....


I think we would all qualify for a degree (or at least a post-graduate diploma) in self-assembly furniture of various different makes! Fortunately, there was nothing of that sort this time, but when it comes to the main house move, probably next year, there's a large and awkward wardrobe to be taken apart and re-assembled. My wife and I still bear the scars of previous tussles with this piece of furniture, although we are now familiar with its faults and foibles.


Martin

We had to move an ikea bed in July. Unfortunately the ikea tools were lost but we had the instructions. So in assembling the beds, sideboards and shelves in a Nesta’s new place I used one of the boxes that came in the ikea packaging to hold all the Hex keys and manuals. Then wrote in big letters what it was on the lid. Considering that her place is only rented I can see myself potentially needing that box within 12 months....

Hope the move went ok.

martin goodall
Posts: 1093
Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 6:20 pm

Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Sun Aug 23, 2020 5:22 pm

I have been making good progress with work on the underside of the layout, consisting of various changes to wiring and switching arrangements, which I had deferred until I could do this work without having to reach up under the layout (involving getting solder to flow uphill).

The changes are fairly mundane and are not easily illustrated, but one priority was to solder diodes across the coils of the electro-magnets for the uncouplers, to counter the backward ‘surge’ in the circuit that can occur when an electro-magnet is switched off. Paul Townsend has been trying to persuade me for several years to do this job, and the only reason for its not having been done sooner was that I was waiting until I could get the baseboards in front of me, while the layout is currently disassembled.

The first photo shows a SEEP electro-magnet with the diode soldered in place across the terminals. The cathode is wired to the Positive side of the circuit. I took the precaution of marking Positive terminals with red paint before doing this.

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The second shot shows a diode soldered across the wires of one of Ray Hodson’s ‘Magic Magnets’ solenoids.

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One of the other changes I made was to move an LED which I had already been using as an indicator when one of the uncoupling magnets is pre-selected, and to insert it in the electro-magnets switch panel immediately below the push-button that is operated to ‘fire’ a selected electro-magnet when a vehicle is standing or passing over it.

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I haven’t previously illustrated the sub-baseboard wiring arrangements, and frankly I am not at all proud of them or of the untidy way in which the wires run every which way, but I have not had any difficulty in identifying wires when necessary.

This shot shows the connections to the section switches panel (which was shown in an earlier post, when the layout was being dismantled). Only minor changes have been made, mainly in order to install an isolating switch in the milk dock / horse landing. The wires that are bundled together here are being led towards the inter-baseboard choc-blocks, while other wires are connected to track feeds on this baseboard.

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The next photo shows the choc block that feeds the electro-magnets switch panel. Changes here were mainly to accommodate a couple of additional LED panel indicators (not associated with the electro-magnets), which will be installed in the baseboard fascia when the layout is re-erected.

Although connections between the various switch panels and their respective choc blocks are colour-coded, most of the under-baseboard wiring is black. The red wires seen in this and other photos are the Positive returns in some of the circuits that are polarity critical, for example because in one or two cases LEDs are wired in parallel with those circuits. On the other hand, I didn’t colour code the Positive and Negative wires in the electro-magnets circuit, even though they too are polarity critical.

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Those wires that cross the baseboard joint are led to choc-blocks connecting the wires across the joint. As explained before, these ‘plugged’ choc blocks are an improvised version.

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Extra circuits will need to cross the baseboard joint in future, and I have installed a pair of proper plugged choc blocks for this purpose.

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Baseboard B has now been set up in place of Baseboard A, so that I can start work on various minor wiring changes beneath that board.

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These under-baseboard photos also enable me to show the point control arrangements – a simple system of rodding and cranks driven by the small brass drawer knobs seen a few weeks back.

(The large square of plywood also visible in the next shot is the underside of the turntable well. The turntable has yet to be built, and the operating mechanism will have to be added below the turntable well, unless I resort to Power by Forefinger.)

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Changes of direction are effected by home-made aluminium cranks.

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The point operating mechanism incorporates micro-switches to change the polarity of the crossing vees. The arrangement of the micro-switches, together with the associated drive mechanism, is a simplified version of a design devised by Iain Rice.

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As soon as I have completed the minor changes to the wiring on Baseboard B, I should then be in a position to re-erect the layout.

martin goodall
Posts: 1093
Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 6:20 pm

Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Sat Sep 12, 2020 9:12 pm

Work has been carrying on steadily over the past few weeks to complete the pre-planned work that had been scheduled while easy access could be gained to the underside of the baseboards.

This included revised feeds to the layout from the two transformers and the feeds to the controllers. The former involved the installation of a new choc block seen on the left of the photo below), and the latter comprised a replacement Din-socket (also seen in this photo) for the Modelex controller, which up to now had been connected to the layout only through a temporary lash-up.

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Another minor job was the installation of an additional isolating switch for the Carriage Siding (in case a railcar is parked there while a movement is taking place in the loop, which would not otherwise be isolated from it).

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I also installed an additional uncoupling magnet in the main line (seen in the next photo before it was wired up to its electrical feeds)

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Finally, a couple of extra choc-blocks were installed for cross-baseboard connections. The one seen here carries electrical feeds across the Baseboard B/C baseboard joint.

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After one or two final electrical jobs, re-assembly of the layout finally got under way in the past week. This involved a re-run of the emptying of King Tut’s tomb to make room for the re-erection of the baseboards. Before access could be gained to the walls of the royal chamber, all the grave goods had first to be removed, starting with the two chests of drawers that had been used to support the baseboards while the electrical work was under way.

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Baseboard A was then positioned so that the baseboard legs could be re-fitted.

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and this baseboard could once again be set on its feet, when the lightweight extension at the back of this baseboard that carries the brewery buildings was also added.

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Finally, the backscene was added to this baseboard.

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Baseboard B was dealt with in the same way.

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The two main baseboards were then brought together.

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At this stage there was a discrepancy in the level of the two boards, but this didn’t faze me.

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It was simply a question of inserting chocks under the legs to even up the height of these baseboards, and to ensure that the baseboard surfaces were completely horizontal (checked with spirit levels).

The baseboard fascias were then added together with the various switch panels, controllers and inter-baseboard connections. Most of the buildings were also placed on the layout, although I have omitted some of these pending some work on the track – a couple of minor repairs and adjustments and then the addition of point rodding and ballasting of the track (a job that has been waiting far too long).

A couple of minor cosmetic repairs will be required, but the layout survived the move remarkably well.

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[The proper layout lighting has not yet been installed; hence the rather odd lighting seen in the two shots above.]

Although there were no real problems, all this took quite a lot of effort (with some very welcome help from my wife), and I fervently hope that the exercise won’t have to be repeated for a good few years. It is slightly frustrating that all this work has simply restored the layout to the state it was in before dismantling started some months ago, but I knew from previous experience that this is unavoidable when a semi-permanent layout has to be moved.


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