The Burford Branch

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martin goodall
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Wed Nov 11, 2020 9:31 am

Up to now I have paid very little attention in this thread to the rolling stock for this layout, mainly because most of the items worked on so far are either unfinished, or have been subject to a lengthy process of refurbishment, after they were first built many years ago. Two of the latter will form the branch passenger train in the 1930s – an autotrailer (Diagram A31) and a short bogie brake third (Diagram D15), which will serve as the spare coach for this train. Like all my models, these vehicles were only ever intended to be ‘an artist’s impression’ of the prototypes, to be seen in context on the layout rather than under the close and merciless scrutiny of the camera lens.

IMG_6708.JPG


The autotrailer has occasionally been seen here before, but has now at last had its buffers replaced at the luggage end, which was the final item in an upgrade that has involved nearly every aspect of this vehicle’s underframe, starting with replacement of the bogies, replacement of the brake cylinders and brake rigging, the addition of autogear, alarm gear and numerous other small details.

IMG_6705.JPG


This model was built from a K’s whitemetal kit, bought about 45 years ago, which was not a very promising starting point. Even with a plastic roof, rather than the cast whitemetal roof which earlier kits had, it is extremely heavy, and could hardly move on its original bogies. The original construction of the model was described in the old Model Railway Constructor in January 1979.

IMG_6711.JPG


The most significant improvement I made to the kit when I originally constructed the model was to file the bolection mouldings to a shape that was a bit closer to the profile of the mouldings on the prototype, and to cut out the end windows at the blanked off luggage end. I chamfered them with a flat needle file, rounding off the corners with a rat-tail file.

IMG_6712.JPG


The K’s kit was supplied with 9-foot American bogies, a type not used on any of the A31 trailers. Long after my model was built, a photo appeared on page 146 of John Lewis' superb book on Great Western Autotrailers (Part 1, WSP 1991) clearly showing that this vehicle had 8-foot 'fish-belly' bogies. MJT torsion bar suspension units (List No.2224 for the 8-foot version) provide a smooth ride for the vehicle. The side frames now fitted are castings from Mallard originally made for their Q Railmotor kit.

IMG_6714.JPG


The D15 Brake Third is a rather crude conversion from an old Tri-ang clerestory. I can’t claim any originality for this; I pinched the idea from Tony East, who described his model in the Railway Modeller early in the 1970s.

IMG_6702.JPG


This was a cut-and-shut job, simply removing one compartment, and fudging the panelling at the luggage end. This frankly doesn’t bear close examination, as the panels are noticeably wider than they should be, and the beading is distinctly sub-standard.

IMG_6697.JPG


The resulting body is a few millimetres over-length, but this has the advantage that a K’s 40-foot roof moulding could be used.

IMG_6695.JPG


The coach is mounted on Dean 6ft 4in bogies (Fourmil etchings in this case, but various alternatives are now available). Underframe details are relatively simple, and I have attempted to give the model a bit of character by judicious weathering and the addition of a destination board, among other details.

IMG_6701.JPG

The branch passenger engine for this period will be an auto-fitted Metro Tank, No.615, which has been ‘awaiting shops’ for a good few years, and may have to wait a while longer, as it’s still in Oxfordshire, whereas I am not. In the meantime, I have various other passenger stock to work on, plus several buildings for the layout.

martin goodall
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Tue Dec 08, 2020 5:02 pm

Further progress on the Burford Branch has been rather slow recently. One thing I did the other day was to put the Station Building and Train Shed back on the layout. This revealed a potential problem that arises from the layout lights being positioned some 18 inches further from the layout than previously, which results in the angle at which the light falls on the layout being noticeably lower. This creates a rather autumnal effect, in contrast to the bright summer sunshine that used to flood the layout.

This can be seen by contrasting the photographs below. The first shows the previous lighting

Bfd 4 (Edit).jpg

Compare that with this next shot, showing the effect of the repositioned lighting

IMG_6768.jpg

Looking the other way, the next photo shows the previous lighting

IMG_1242.JPG

Whilst the shot reproduced below shows the same view under the current lighting.

IMG_6767.jpg

The currently repositioned lighting also throws longer shadows across the station yard and brewery yard, which further increases the autumnal effect. You might think this lighting is ‘atmospheric’, but it does not produce the look I intended, and I would prefer to restore the effect of the higher summer sun, which will involve moving the lighting rig. This is plumbed-in to the ceiling (so it's a job that I am not looking forward to doing).
Last edited by martin goodall on Tue Jan 26, 2021 5:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

BrockleyAndrew
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby BrockleyAndrew » Tue Dec 08, 2020 7:28 pm

I'd thought about what season for a layout, but never about lighting for different times of day!.... obvious contrast to day layouts is a night scene but artificial night lighting casts the same shadows all night...is Brettel Road ever twilight or always deep night, Jim? (I know you use it as a daytime background for stock photographs).
So, Martin, as a townscape Burford doesn't have any seasonal trees does it? So could be any time of year?

Andrew

martin goodall
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Wed Dec 09, 2020 11:26 am

At one time, quite a few years ago, I did seriously contemplate an Autumn setting for the layout. I was impressed by the attractive Autumn colours on Jas Millham’s Yaxbury Branch layout. But in the end, I decided that I would prefer to set the layout in high Summer, with parched grass and the deep green tree foliage one sees in August.

There will in fact be quite a few trees on the layout, one or two of which are already in place. Re-spraying them to display yellowing leaves would probably not be a problem, but the change in the quality of the sunlight (which the altered positioning of the layout lights has brought about), whilst it produces an atmospheric effect, rather puts me off; hence my preference for the bright sunshine of high Summer.

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jim s-w
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby jim s-w » Wed Dec 09, 2020 1:47 pm

BrockleyAndrew wrote:is Brettel Road ever twilight or always deep night, Jim? (I know you use it as a daytime background for stock photographs).
Andrew


Think of it as about 5pm to 7pm in late October (after the clocks change). Kind of evening rush hour (not that anyone’s rushing or many people are about at all). Any later than that and it starts to look odd that the business are still open. I can’t remember the exact time I’ve done the clocks in the station buildings!

I’ve aimed for a faint orange glow on the horizon the view Is kinda looking north west.

I really like the shadows Martin. It’s not something a lot of railway modellers think about aiming for a flat even light. I don’t think ‘rural grim’ as opposed to my preferred urban grim would really work in your case though. Can you make the light warmer and just say it’s a summer evening? Obviously on my other layout shadows are quite a big deal. :thumb

Jim
Last edited by jim s-w on Wed Dec 09, 2020 5:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.

martin goodall
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Wed Dec 09, 2020 2:07 pm

jim s-w wrote:I really like the shadows Martin. It’s not something a lot of railway modellers think about aiming for a flat even light. I don’t think ‘rural grim’ as opposed to my preferred urban grim would really work in your case though. Can you make the light warmer and just say it’s a summer evening? Obviously on my other layout shadows are quite a big deal.


I entirely agree. 'Rural grim' is a real no-no on the Burford Branch, so far as I'm concerned.

The current lighting rig has already been beefed up by fitting four new 13.5-watt LED bulbs with a good warm colour temperature (2,700 Kelvin [now checked]) and with a fairly even spectrum distribution (not measured, but simply judged by eye), which pour more than 6,000 lumens over the layout, so the only way of increasing the 'warmth' of the light would be by moving the lights closer to the layout, i.e. back to roughly the same relative position they were in before the layout was moved.

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jim s-w
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby jim s-w » Wed Dec 09, 2020 3:04 pm

Orange filters?

martin goodall
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Wed Dec 09, 2020 8:01 pm

jim s-w wrote:Orange filters?

This might be effective in changing the quality of light from an Autumn afternoon to a Summer evening, but the problem of the long shadows would remain. Not only does this throw the platform side of the station building into shadow (as shown on my recent photos), but it makes the shadows that are thrown on the backscene by the two malt kilns about an inch and a half taller, which would require significantly taller low relief trees on the backscene to catch the shadows, so as to prevent them falling on the backscene itself (where the painted houses are supposed to be some distance away).

So it's not just the quality of the light that bothers me, but the angle at which it falls on the layout.

I dare say this sort of thing wouldn't bother most railway modellers in the slightest, but even on a home-based layout I think that both lighting and presentation are important, as are composition and colour. Maybe this is too art-farty for some, but Chacun à son goût.
Last edited by martin goodall on Thu Dec 17, 2020 5:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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jim s-w
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby jim s-w » Wed Dec 09, 2020 8:27 pm

I can see what your saying Martin and the shadows on the backscene are a definite problem.

I just much prefer the new shadows as they, to me, create much more interesting images. I can see it’s not the look you’re after. (Plus it’s not the way you’ve done the backscene either)

Another suggestion can you either defuse the light to loose the harsh shadows or can you bounce the lights off the ceiling to change their direction?

It might help if we could see how the lighting is arranged.

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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Thu Dec 10, 2020 10:33 am

(The lighting rig was illustrated in a post in this thread on 31st October.)

I am going to leave it for now, and take time to reconsider the lighting issue. I might be able to live with the shadowing effect inside the Train Shed. The bleakness in the recent photos may have been due to some extent to the absence (at present) of platform furniture.

The lighting level over the rest of the layout is probably still acceptable, and it would not be the end of the world if the low relief trees that will stand against the backscene have to be somewhat taller than I originally intended.

This might be a better alternative to having to move the ceiling fitting, which would really be a bit of a faff.

Work over the next few weeks will have to be done off the layout, and I have taken the Goods Shed components away with me, with a view to making further progress on that building.

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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Sun Jan 17, 2021 6:52 pm

More than a month has elapsed since I last reported progress on the Burford Branch, because there really hasn’t been any more progress since then.

I decided last November that I really ought to try to get the Goods Shed finished. This model is a prime example of the ‘slow modelling’ that has always been my default approach to the hobby. It was the first building I started to construct for this layout. That was in 1992 (!) – getting on for 30 years ago.

The first two photos (taken in 1993) show the earliest stage in its construction. It is typical of goods sheds built on the GWR and associated lines in the 1860s. The model is based loosely on the goods shed at Thame, with other details from West Ealing, Kidlington and Hungerford.

Bfd GS1.jpg

The structure is mainly built from Wills scenic sheets (SSMP 227 - English bond brickwork, for the main walls). The 2 x 1 mock-up for the platform was too high, and was later replaced by a thinner piece of wood to provide a lower platform.

Bfd GS2.jpg

The lean-to at the left-hand end of the building is the goods office, while the goods lock-up is at the right-hand end. The intention is to add a corrugated iron extension to this, as seen at West Ealing (below).

W Ealing 1.jpg

Another detail that I incorporated in the model, taken in this case from the shed at Hungerford, was the corbelling back of the brickwork on one side of the entrance arch at the right-hand of the building, in order to give staff access to the open goods deck beyond.

IMG_5158.JPG

After a time, the front wall of the shed acquired a warp, and this was dealt with by screwing a substantial piece of L-section brass to the inside of the wall. The screw heads on the outside of the wall will be hidden by the boxed eaves in due course.

IMG_6729.JPG

The bright brick red of the plastic mouldings was ‘killed’ by painting the whole structure with matt white enamel before further painting of the walls. I decided that this would best be done before further assembly of the structure.

IMG_6723.JPG

The next photo [seen before] shows the component parts of the building propped in position on the layout.

IMG_5855.JPG

As shown when I was explaining the dismantling of the layout prior to its move last year, I have also built the structure of the goods deck inside the shed.

IMG_5856.JPG

I decided to continue with the painting of the walls before further assembly. I assumed that this building would have been constructed with yellow London stocks, like the shed at Kidlington. I took some colour reference photos there many years ago, but these were of little practical use, as they were taken after the brickwork had been scrubbed clean when the building was converted for industrial use and had lost its sooty patina. The black and white photos below, which I had taken some years earlier give a better impression of the previous appearance of the brickwork.

Kidlington 1.jpg

Kidlington 2.jpg

I pored over various articles describing a bewildering number of different ways to paint brickwork, but came to the conclusion that I would just have to experiment for myself, having chosen to use enamels in this case. After a false start trying to paint a light mortar colour before painting the bricks, I ended up applying Phoenix-Precision P971 Yellow Brick (matt) over the whole of the main walls. When this had been allowed to dry thoroughly, a thin coat of Humbrol 72 Khaki Drill was brushed over the brick panels and wiped off immediately. The intention was to represent the darker mortar courses, but this was only partially successful.

IMG_6763.JPG

I had also picked out some of the stretchers with Humbrol 61 ‘Flesh’, and was quite pleased with the effect when seen on the workbench, but as the photo above shows, it was hardly visible when the model was set on the layout. Clearly, this is going to require further work, and I need to be rather less subtle in creating a variegated effect in the brickwork. I have downloaded suitable photos from the internet showing a number of buildings constructed of yellow London stocks which display varying states of weathering, and I shall have another go at it.

I intended that the brickwork on the goods lock-up at the right-hand end of the shed should be brown brick, in contrast to the yellow stock bricks used on the remainder of the building. So, in this case, I made up a 50:50 mix of the yellow brick colour with Humbrol 29 Dark Earth, which seemed to give the right sort of colour. To represent yellow mortar, I later applied a thin mix of the yellow brick colour, then wiped it off with a dry tissue, leaving the yellow mortar colour in the mortar courses.

IMG_6746.JPG


However, I can’t say that this was particularly convincing, and it is even less visible when the model is viewed on the layout.

IMG_6762.JPG


IMG_6761.JPG


And that was as far as I had got by early December, when I last had the opportunity of visiting the layout. I brought the Goods Shed components back home with me, and when I can work up enough enthusiasm to carry on with it, I will have a more determined go at painting the brickwork. I am confident that I can achieve the effect I want; it is just that the motivation is lacking at the moment. (But it’s a good excuse to indulge in some armchair modelling instead!)

JFS
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby JFS » Mon Jan 18, 2021 10:25 am

Not sure if this would be any help at all, but this is a Kodachrome II slide of Thame GS I took on 31 July 1973. It was not the brightest of days! There seem to be a lot of blue engineering bricks about the thing and it was quite a "dark" looking building I recall. The extension to the office is interestingly different. I went to Watlington on the same day and took quite a few of the station building which was still in its GW paintwork. I can post those if of interest.

Keep up the good work!

Thame GS Small.jpg


Best Wishes,

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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby JFS » Mon Jan 18, 2021 10:30 am

... just one thing is worrying me Martin - why is the chimney at the opposite end to the office?

martin goodall
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Mon Jan 18, 2021 11:03 am

Many thanks, Howard.

Close-up photos of the goods shed at Thame seem to be as rare as hen's teeth, so this is a very helpful reference. Ian Harrison kindly sent me a copy of his drawings of this shed some years ago, which he had surveyed before it was demolished.

A unique feature of the shed at Thame was that the brick piers on the side of the shed facing the line had been cut back at some date to give an extra 4½ inches clearance (!)

I am not copying the design of the shed at Thame exactly; for example, the rail entrances on my shed will have elliptical arches, with a semi-circular arch over the road entrance at the left-hand end, and different lean-to additions (goods office, goods lock-up, etc.), but the Thame design was the starting point.

In point of fact, this was a more or less standard design for goods sheds on the GWR and associated lines in the 1860s. The leading dimensions were generally the same, with variations in the material from which each shed was constructed, and various changes in the detailing (such as the omission of brick piers and thinner brick panels between them in some cases).

Being located in the Cotswolds, I decided that the shed at Burford might well have been built of yellow London stocks like the shed at Kidlington, rather than red bricks, in order to blend in with the Cotswold limestone of the surrounding buildings.

I am sure that the photos of the station at Watlington would be of considerable interest (although not perhaps to dyed-in-the-wool enthusiasts for minor lines, such as the LMS or the LNER). I started photographing ex-GWR buildings myself in 1973, but only in black and white, and I concentrated on lines that were still open, on the (possibly mistaken) assumption that the remains on closed lines would be fewer and further between. My most frustrating experience was to arrive at Henley, camera at the ready, only to find that the train shed had been demolished six weeks earlier!

(Incidentally, it's worth remembering that all the buildings on the Watlington & Princes Risborough Railway were unique to that line - they were not GWR designs; the Great Western just happened to take over the line to save it from bankruptcy.)
Last edited by martin goodall on Mon Jan 18, 2021 4:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Mon Jan 18, 2021 11:10 am

Since I wrote my response to Howard, I have just seen his second comment.

The goods office at Burford is at the left-hand end of the shed, and the chimney is at that end. The lean-to brick extension at the right-hand end (together with the corrugated iron extension next to it, which has yet to be added to the model) is the goods lock-up.

I appreciate that one would normally expect the goods office to be at the end of the building nearest the station building, but for some reason it was arranged the other round at Burford.
Last edited by martin goodall on Mon Jan 18, 2021 4:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

JFS
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby JFS » Mon Jan 18, 2021 1:04 pm

Just to mention that Howard is JFS! Also I understand about the W&PRR - however, it is the preservation of the GW colours that is the interesting aspect - especially given the strange ideas often seen on preserved lines! I will start a separate thread rather than clog things up here.

I had the same experience of getting to Devizes just as the buldozers drove off-site - though the goods shed and a few minor buildings were still standing. By contrast, I photographed Tetbury GS and Salisbury (SR) completely and they are still standing today! But I did get the GW goods shed and SB at Salisbury and they are not...

At Watlington, everything was still there mouldering slowly in 1973, and, athough the signal box was burnt down about 12 months later, most of it was just left and is still there today - apart from the fact that everything timber has slowly rotted to nothing and the wholes site is burried in trees.

Thanks for pointing out the arrangement of your offices - I had missed that detail. I was also interested that you mention Kiddlington being Yellow brick as I had assumed that were all much the same and I remember a few in engineering brick - Culham and Newbury being two further examples. But no doubt there were plenty of variants.

Best Wishes,
Howard

martin goodall
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Mon Jan 18, 2021 1:34 pm

Thanks, Howard. I had just worked out that JFS and Howard Bolton were one and the same person, and had edited my last post accordingly just before your latest note. I admit that I missed this point when originally replying.

I did quite a bit of research into GWR structure colours some years ago. I was originally sceptical about the survival of GWR structure colours after so many years, but there is ample evidence (like the photos you took at Watlington) that these colours did survive in quite a few locations long after the old company ceased to exist. I entirely agree, though, about the bizarre interpretation of these colours on some preserved lines. However, my researches did convince me that even on the GWR itself there were noticeable variations from place to place in the reproduction of these 'standard tints'.

My remark about the W&PRR buildings was aimed at those GWR enthusiasts who choose to model their goods sheds on the admittedly attractive structures at Chinnor, Aston Rowant and Watlington in the apparent belief that they were GWR buildings, whereas they were seen nowhere else on the GWR system.

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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Fri Jan 22, 2021 11:02 am

After a period of six weeks over Christmas and the New Year when I did no model-making at all, I finally got back to work on painting the brickwork of the Goods Shed this week.

There was no need to change the basic yellow brick colour that I had previously applied to the model; what was needed was the darkening/sooting of some bricks and picking out others in a pinkish orange, following my previous attempt at the latter which had proved to be far too subtle. Humbrol 72 Khaki Drill was dry-brushed over some areas of the walls, as well as picking out some bricks in this colour, and Humbrol 61 ‘Flesh’ was also applied neat to some individual bricks,

IMG_6797.JPG


I dry-brushed Humbrol 29 Dark Earth over the goods lock-up at the right hand end of the building in order to emphasise the brown bricks used for this extension, in contrast to the yellow London stocks used on the rest of the building.

IMG_6799.JPG


The gable end at this end of the building has been left reasonably clean, because I intend to add some sign-writing to this gable. This was the main reason for painting the walls before the building is assembled.

IMG_6800.JPG


Slightly more soot/blackening was evident at the other end of the building at Kidlington, including signs of smoke seeping through the brickwork of the chimney.

IMG_6793.JPG


There was very noticeable blackening of the bricks at Kidlington around the road entrance to the shed at this end, and I have attempted to produce this in my model. I am not totally satisfied with the effect, but this feature will be difficult to see from normal viewing angles on the layout, so I’m not going to lose any sleep over it. Before the paint had dried hard, mortar courses were raked out with a scriber to restore the underlying yellow mortar colour.

IMG_6804.JPG

I will only be able to assess the colour of the building properly when I can view it on the layout, which is not likely to be for quite a few weeks yet. I will probably tone down the colour of the brickwork further by brushing soot over the walls, as I have done on other buildings on the layout.

In the meantime, I can now deal with the lettering on the gable wall, and then there is a lot of constructional work to get on with. This model is still a long way from being finished.

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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Tue Jan 26, 2021 5:30 pm

I’ve just finished adding the lettering to the gable end of the Goods Shed. This admittedly involved some modeller’s licence. The GWR sometimes announced the presence of a goods depot in this way on the end of a goods shed, but the subsidiary wording is admittedly an invention on my part. (I didn’t think that “Express goods train service - one day transit between important towns”, as seen on the side of the goods sheds at Stroud and at Brimscombe, would quite work for a terminus at the end of a country branch line.)

IMG_6806.JPG

The lettering was done with home-made water slide transfers, composing the text on the computer using suitable fonts and then printing this onto decal film. The slightly worn or faded appearance of the lettering was achieved by using a greyscale setting for the lettering, rather than black. Due to problems encountered in trying to get my laptop to communicate with the printer I wanted to use, I ended up by printing it out on another printer, then scanning the image and saving it as a PDF file, and printing the water slide decals from that. By luck, the slight loss of definition in the image that resulted enhanced the sign-written and slightly ‘tired’ appearance of the lettering that I was aiming for.

The relevant area on the brickwork had been painted with gloss varnish beforehand to give a good surface to which to apply the transfers, and the use of ‘Microset’ and ‘Microsol’ helped the transfers to bed down firmly onto the brickwork. When the transfers have thoroughly hardened, I shall spray them with Testor’s Dulcote, both to restore the matt appearance of the brickwork and to protect the lettering. As I mentioned before, the building will get some additional weathering before it is finally installed on the layout

IMG_6805.JPG

These photos were taken on the workbench in less than ideal lighting, so they don’t really show the appearance of the lettering as it will be seen when the goods shed is in place on the layout.

Tony Wilkins
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby Tony Wilkins » Wed Jan 27, 2021 3:55 pm

Nice one.
Tony.
Inspiration from the past. Dreams for the future.

martin goodall
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Wed Jan 27, 2021 8:32 pm

Thanks, Tony. The final result was better than I had expected.

The decal film proved to be extremely delicate when separated from the backing sheet, which I suspect is why the instructions recommend that after printing the lettering on the decal sheet on a laser printer (this particular decal paper is designed specifically for laser printing) it should be sprayed with Microscale Liquid Decal Film to strengthen the decal film so that it will not bunch up when applied to the model.

I didn't have that particular product to hand, so I had to try my luck with the unprotected decal film, and I did have problems with it, only succeeding with the smaller lettering at my third attempt.

Before I spray Testor's Dulcote varnish on these transfers, I have taken the precaution today of applying some spare transfers to a test piece, and I will test the Dulcote on that, before committing myself to using it on the actual model. I have successfully applied Testor's Dulcote to POWsides rub-down transfers in the past, but having heard cautionary tales about this varnish I felt that it would be a wise precaution to test it first.

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Paul Willis
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby Paul Willis » Wed Jan 27, 2021 10:14 pm

martin goodall wrote:Before I spray Testor's Dulcote varnish on these transfers, I have taken the precaution today of applying some spare transfers to a test piece, and I will test the Dulcote on that, before committing myself to using it on the actual model. I have successfully applied Testor's Dulcote to POWsides rub-down transfers in the past, but having heard cautionary tales about this varnish I felt that it would be a wise precaution to test it first.


Ahem... https://www.scalefour.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=7198

Very sensible idea. How full is your can?

Cheers
Paul
Beware of Trains - occasional modelling in progress!
www.5522models.co.uk

martin goodall
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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Thu Jan 28, 2021 1:03 pm

My spray can of Dulcote has had very little use, so is presumably still quite full.

My decal film was given a fairly generous brushing with Microsol, so has been firmly bedded down. I am therefore hoping that it will be OK.

I haven't had time this morning to spray Dulcote on the test piece that I prepared yesterday, but I shall do so this afternoon, and will then wait until the varnish has had time to dry thoroughly so that I can assess the effect before spraying the transfers on the Goods Shed (or not, if it turns out there's a problem).

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Re: The Burford Branch

Postby martin goodall » Mon Feb 22, 2021 3:58 pm

After a few days’ pause, I sprayed Testor’s Dulcote on the Goods Shed lettering without any problem, and then started work on fabricating the windows for the goods shed office and the goods lock-up.

For the office, I adapted a plastic moulding from a Wills windows pack, cutting it in half to produce a sash window (adding a transom from Evergreen strip, and building up the frame from other pieces of strip). For the sash window in the lock-up, I used an etching from D&S Models (DS WF5), again building up the frame from Evergreen strip. Outer frames (which were to be painted Dark Stone) were built up separately from Evergreen strip.

GS 1.JPG

The window frame for the corrugated iron extension to the lock-up was fabricated later from strip.

The outer frames of the windows were painted Dark Stone, and the windows were then assembled and stuck in place, and the corrugated iron extension to the lock-up was finally added.

GS 2.JPG

GS 3.JPG

GS 4.JPG

The next phase of construction provided a real sense of progress at last, with the assembly of the end walls and back wall around the structure of the goods deck.

There were originally intended to be windows in the back wall, but I changed my mind and bricked up the window openings. The interior had also been weathered with MiG powder (“Russian Earth”) which on being wiped over with a dry tissue gave a suitably sooty/weathered effect.

GS 5.JPG

My intention had been to leave the back of the goods shed unfinished (on the grounds that it won’t be seen from any normal viewing angle), but experience had shown me that photographs taken looking along the goods yard would betray my laziness, so I compromised by adding plain brickwork on this elevation. The brickwork is card from the backing of one of the larger packs of Scalelink etchings, which needed very little trimming to fit, and also gave a reasonable impression of weathered yellow stock bricks.

GS 6.JPG

The rear flank wall of the goods office was painted to represent cement rendering. This treatment of the back wall of the shed should look OK in the event of any oblique view of this side of the building being seen in photos taken looking along the back road of the yard.

GS 7.JPG

The front wall of the goods shed will not be stuck in position until I have completed all the internal details, and I have not yet added the windows on this side of the building, but I propped it in place to see what the building looks like at this stage.

GS 8.JPG

GS 9.JPG

The next job will be to lay the flooring planks on the goods deck, and then add the crane, as well as some goods standing on the deck.


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