Brook Street 1989 - 1991 Speedlink

Tell us about your layout, where you put it, how you built it, how you operate it.
Terry Bendall
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Re: Brook Street 1989 - 1991 Speedlink

Postby Terry Bendall » Thu Oct 07, 2021 8:34 am

As Phil says there is more then one way of doing many jobs.

Phil Eames wrote: To lead the cassettes onto the layout proper, short lengths of angle were cut and drilled to not only be screwed to the threshold, but also to accept the electrical wiring. The wires being connected to the angle with eyelet crimp terminal using countersunk screws.


My method for this part is to use a piece of 12mm thick MDF for the base of the cassettes and the same thickness for the "translator" part. The aluminium angle is screwed down to the MDF and the wires connected by small eyelet terminals fixed with in this case short 8BA nuts and bolts. I also use a short length of track from the track on the baseboard to the aluminium angle. This does introduce an additional joint but it works.

Phil Eames wrote: It will be noted that electrical continuity between the threshold and cassette is made using bulldog clips.


For this job I used folded over brass sheet. A piece 40mm x 25mm x 0.4mm thick is folded over the aluminium angle and tapped down flat. There is sufficient springiness in the bass to conduct the power and they don't work loose. The corners are bent up slightly which gives something the grip on when removing the clips.

Terry Bendall

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John Donnelly
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Re: Brook Street 1989 - 1991 Speedlink

Postby John Donnelly » Thu Oct 07, 2021 10:27 am

On South Pelaw, I've also soldered the rails at the ends of the boards to pins driven in the baseboards. As most of my track passes over the boards almost parallel to the joins, I've managed to nail the pins in through the rivet holes in the end sleepers. Solder the rail on, grind down any excess and fit a half chair either side and the pins are completely invisible.

davebradwell
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Re: Brook Street 1989 - 1991 Speedlink

Postby davebradwell » Thu Oct 07, 2021 3:09 pm

On cassette couplers there is, of course, the original article by Chris Pendlenton in MRJ 27 and which should ideally be re-printed somewhere. Chris uses an integral coupling or there's the Mike Clark version available from himself. No loose bits to lose. Built-in contact is self cleaning, too. Your loose connectors don't address vertical alignment and with my near 5ft cassettes curving upwards in Winter and down in Summer something very positive is essential.

As for electrical connections you should really put a star washer between the tag and the aly which will cut through the oxide coating on the aly. I've had failures without it, even with our clean Highland air. I think tags are available with the star as part of the hole.

Beware also some popular sources of aly angle which have an insulating anodised coating.

Perhaps someone will explain to me why you might want to screw the Tortoise to a plate which you then screw to the baseboard when they work perfectly well fitted directly as in the instructions. Rubber mounts would be a good thing, perhaps, to reduce noise. I think a resilient layer is desirable under track, though, even at low speeds.

DaveB

Phil Eames
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Re: Brook Street 1989 - 1991 Speedlink

Postby Phil Eames » Fri Oct 08, 2021 6:10 am

davebradwell wrote:On cassette couplers there is, of course, the original article by Chris Pendlenton in MRJ 27 and which should ideally be re-printed somewhere. Chris uses an integral coupling or there's the Mike Clark version available from himself. No loose bits to lose. Built-in contact is self cleaning, too. Your loose connectors don't address vertical alignment and with my near 5ft cassettes curving upwards in Winter and down in Summer something very positive is essential.


The cassettes for the layout, indeed the whole layout, were built under ambient conditions with the maximum length of the cassettes is 880mm. So under extreme conditions the deviation in the cassettes is not going to be as great as your 5ft ones. But also I cannot see the layout being operated under those extreme conditions?

At home I would find no pleasure in operating with the temperature being either too hot or too cold. For the former I would find something else to do for the later I would put the heating on. But as I have said previously I only usually use the layout to test things out at home

At an exhibition the dates for those I usually attend, end at the beginning of June and start again in September. So the potentially really hot spells of weather are between these dates. Though who knows what the future will bring? Fortunately the days of winter exhibitions with the heating cranked right up appear to be long gone. In 35+ years of being 'on the road' with various layouts, there has only been one that a coat was needed to keep warm was needed. Fortunately I also had my fingerless gloves with me! But that's a story for apres exhibition......

davebradwell wrote:As for electrical connections you should really put a star washer between the tag and the aly which will cut through the oxide coating on the aly. I've had failures without it, even with our clean Highland air. I think tags are available with the star as part of the hole.

Beware also some popular sources of aly angle which have an insulating anodised coating.


That's a good one Dave which I hadn't thought of. If and when it becomes a problem I will remember that and act accordingly.

I am reasonably sure the aluminium was mill finish, but I went over it with an abrasive block anyway, cleaning up with IPA.

davebradwell wrote:Perhaps someone will explain to me why you might want to screw the Tortoise to a plate which you then screw to the baseboard when they work perfectly well fitted directly as in the instructions. Rubber mounts would be a good thing, perhaps, to reduce noise. I think a resilient layer is desirable under track, though, even at low speeds.


IMG_20211008_060327059s.jpg


The Exactoscale base features a recess in which a plastic 'tie bar' runs. Wire droppers from the point blade are inserted into the brass tubing that has an interference fit in the tie bar. Although not required for this layout the brass tubing can be offset to suit the location, which was a absolute godsend for the last layout.

I find the noise of the Tortoise not that instructive, nothing like the 'thwack' of a solenoid point motor. The main use of the layout will be at exhibitions (hopefully!) where the ambient noise to likely to drown out that of the point motor. Again its a personal thing but I find the gentle whirring noise reassuring that something has happened.

The appearance of the Model Rail Scotland mug has nothing to do with where you live Dave. Its to remind me to get on with the layout and to get out on the road again.
Cheers
Phil


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