16T Weathering Experiments

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Phil O
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Re: 16T Weathering Experiments

Postby Phil O » Sat Jan 23, 2021 4:04 pm

When we received steel plate, 1/4 inch and above, it was coated in a light to medium grey with its colour code painted on one corner. The colour code identified the type of steel, its been a long time since I had any dealings with steel plate, so I can no longer remember the grades and their related colour codes.

I don't know whether or not the wagon producers received their plate in a similar condition. One thing is for certain any paint would have been removed in areas to be welded, it's a right pain the backside to strike an arc on painted steel.

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Lord Colnago
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Re: 16T Weathering Experiments

Postby Lord Colnago » Mon Jan 25, 2021 1:20 pm

Hi Paul,

I've been following this with interest and must say that you are making a marvellous job of the weathering, particularly as a first attempt. Its inspiring stuff, so much so that I have dug out a couple of Bachmann 16 tonners so that I can have a play myself, particularly on the insides, something that I have always struggled with. Another area that I always struggle with is the depiction of bare wood. Your photos have given me an idea or two so I'll go away and have a play with that too. Keep up the interesting work, keep posting and get that Rumney chassis finished!!

All the best.

John.
The second best priest

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Paul Willis
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Re: 16T Weathering Experiments

Postby Paul Willis » Mon Jan 25, 2021 10:40 pm

Lord Colnago wrote: Another area that I always struggle with is the depiction of bare wood. Your photos have given me an idea or two so I'll go away and have a play with that too.


Hi John,

One of the tutorials that I keep bookmarked is this one on weathered wood: https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/99826-weathered-wood-a-worked-example/

I've tried it and experimented with different levels of colour change in the basecoats, and it works very well, whether you are going for a consistent finish or one picking out many different planks.

Cheers
(Another) Paul
Beware of Trains - occasional modelling in progress!
www.5522models.co.uk

Terry Bendall
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Re: 16T Weathering Experiments

Postby Terry Bendall » Tue Jan 26, 2021 8:39 am

Phil O wrote:When we received steel plate, 1/4 inch and above, it was coated in a light to medium grey


This was probably the oxide coating left from when the plate was rolled in the steel mill, not paint. The same "finish" was present when I used to order steel sheet when I was teaching. It is the sort of finish that those who model wagons that are designed to carry coils of steel try to emulate.

Phil O wrote: One thing is for certain any paint would have been removed in areas to be welded, it's a right pain the backside to strike an arc on painted steel.


It is, but less of a problem with the oxide coating

Terry Bendall

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Noel
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Re: 16T Weathering Experiments

Postby Noel » Tue Jan 26, 2021 2:36 pm

Continuous wide strip rolling mills start with a hot steel slab and end with a roll of plate of the required thickness. What happens after that depends on what the customer wants. It can be cold rolled to produce sheet, left as it is or "pickled" in acid to clean it. As mineral wagons used 1/4" plate, it was presumably delivered to the manufacturers as rolls, but whether pickled or untreated (blackplate) I don't know. Given the nature of the process it would seem likely that the steel works would clean the rolls before despatch.
Regards
Noel

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Captain Kernow
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Re: 16T Weathering Experiments

Postby Captain Kernow » Tue Jan 26, 2021 4:55 pm

Paul Hutfield wrote:I did try to replicate was the witness of the load on the interiors. A bit like a tide mark on a dock or river bank. I've highlighted this witness in Bryan's Kingswear image, highlighting my observation with the application of some crudely applied red lines

Have you considered some dry-brushing of the darker colour, Paul, describing a gentle arc, as per the photos?

Also, in general terms, I find that (for a dry wagon interior, as opposed to one that has been sitting out in the rain), you can get wonderfully subtle variations with the judicious use of weathering powders.

This also applies to the external parts of the wagon as well, of course, especially parts of the chassis.

Keep up the good work!
Tim M
Member of the Devon Riviera Area Group.

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Noel
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Re: 16T Weathering Experiments

Postby Noel » Wed Jan 27, 2021 4:46 pm

Another view of the inside of a 16T [undated on the Nuneaton History website, probably late 1960s at a guess] http://www.nuneatonhistory.com/uploads/1/8/6/8/18680466/6503837_orig.jpg, showing the witness marks on the side and end. The wagon doesn't appear to have any replating or rebodying, but has probably acquired a new door and has a reinforcement of the brake lever. It also appears to be devoid of paint on the chassis, although it has been repainted at least once, judging by the tare weight marking.

Thanks to Steamraiser for the link.
Regards
Noel

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David Thorpe
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Re: 16T Weathering Experiments

Postby David Thorpe » Thu Jan 28, 2021 11:48 am

Captain Kernow wrote:Also, in general terms, I find that (for a dry wagon interior, as opposed to one that has been sitting out in the rain), you can get wonderfully subtle variations with the judicious use of weathering powders. This also applies to the external parts of the wagon as well, of course, especially parts of the chassis.


I'd echo that. I've found weathering pigments very useful and have been happy with the effects achieved. I'd recommend the Abteilung range from which I've found Black Smoke, Dark Mud, and Standard Rust give almost all the basic effects I require.

DT

andrewnummelin
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Re: 16T Weathering Experiments

Postby andrewnummelin » Thu Jan 28, 2021 12:38 pm

By chance I came across this photo when looking for something else. Not a 16T wagon but it does show on the side an apparent load line that fits with the end. However I can't imagine the normal load being as low as these marks indicate, so the pattern may have a more complex origin.
1770.jpg

jpeg version of a tiff scan of a slide I took at Rhymney in 1968.
Regards,

Andrew Nummelin

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Captain Kernow
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Re: 16T Weathering Experiments

Postby Captain Kernow » Thu Jan 28, 2021 2:05 pm

David Thorpe wrote:
Captain Kernow wrote:Also, in general terms, I find that (for a dry wagon interior, as opposed to one that has been sitting out in the rain), you can get wonderfully subtle variations with the judicious use of weathering powders. This also applies to the external parts of the wagon as well, of course, especially parts of the chassis.


I'd echo that. I've found weathering pigments very useful and have been happy with the effects achieved. I'd recommend the Abteilung range from which I've found Black Smoke, Dark Mud, and Standard Rust give almost all the basic effects I require.

Almost exactly the same shades that I now use, David (recommended to me originally by Mick Bonwick, I believe).
Tim M
Member of the Devon Riviera Area Group.

Simon Moore
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Re: 16T Weathering Experiments

Postby Simon Moore » Sat Feb 20, 2021 7:56 pm

A very interesting topic Paul & i am looking forward to trying these techniques. I have been looking for a good tutorial on how to weather wagons better than my usual route.

I will give it a go when the paint turns up.


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