Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

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RobM
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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby RobM » Wed Nov 29, 2017 5:33 pm

Allan Goodwillie wrote: It is not necessary to build everything from brass or nickel silver.....


I agree.....the kilns on Mount Woodville started life as a soil pipe, the curved corrugated roof from a plastic shampoo bottle, the water circulator on the coal mine will be a plastic funnel..........so many every day things are very useful to the modeller.
Rob
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Allan Goodwillie
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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Sun Dec 03, 2017 10:52 pm

There has been some good progress with the earthworks and track over a couple of key boards. I have taken dozens of photographs as a record of even the little things just to remind me of how it has come together. So here are a few just to give a flavour. The earthworks were quite messy as on the two key boards tracks either drop away or climb up from the junction of lines, so there has been some carving and building up going on prior to laying track.

DSC02735.JPG


Sine I already have built most of the smaller structures it has allowed me to place and mark them on the baseboards. This has allowed me to trial where the tracks are going to go and make sure there are proper clearances as in the photograph above. I have also made the points avoid joints and yet keep the correct relationship to the buildings. I made the decision to place the points away from the joint as far as was possible when they led to tracks climbing or dropping. This allowed me to get the slopes and cambers established before the joints and not at the joints where they may give most trouble.

DSC02723.JPG


The cork is being ground away to establish the different grades in the above image.

The gradients both up and down being built initially in foam and finished off with a rough wood rasp and checked for level using a ruler and spirit level.

DSC02728.JPG


DSC02729.JPG


DSC02730.JPG


The finishing is to put on a final layer of cork and then take out any slight dips with light weight cove filler which sticks OK to cork and can take a certain amount of flexing without being a problem.

DSC02734.JPG


-so a little messy looking before sanding. There is an art as well as a science to changing gradients which I will not go into just yet - I will come back to this when laying the track. Enough to say that every change is made gradually in small steps forming curves, the same is true of the cambers which should always start on a straight and lift gradually until the camber angle is set over the length of the longest vehicle likely to work over the line - there are I am sure proper standards for such things. I always use my longest vehicle and I also check that when the track is set on top that an uncompensated wagon will run OK on it. I check all my track laying and making this way.

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Philip Hall » Mon Dec 04, 2017 7:43 pm

Allan, very interested in your comments re superelevation. You say you start to elevate the outer rail on the straight, so does this mean that the outer rail rises to the amount required before the curve starts? On my railway there will be a very gentle curve though the platforms (essentially the straight bit) which leads into a slightly cambered one (probably around 4’6” at the sharpest point) which in turn become a reverse curve. At the point of reversal, I am thinking the camber should gradually end and then restart the other way?

I am not proposing very much, simply a tiny amount for visual effect on reverse curves. Would be interested as to what you advise.

Philip

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Tue Dec 05, 2017 5:45 pm

Hi Philip, :)

I have been laying in my own one this afternoon, not quite finished yet, but will post a picture when finished. Yes as far as I understand the super elevation started on the straight and finished on the straight staying what was set all the way around the curve. The transition took into account the theoretical maximum length of the longest stock. When laying my own ones I test with the longest vehicle wheelbase likely and I have a number of wagons uncompensated which I use for the job. The line I am doing at the moment in real life had a check rail fitted, yet the curve was not particularly extreme. However one of the Barclay locomotives had come off the embankment on a previous occasion, after which the check rail was fitted therefor there was a camber and check-rail.

On my Grayrigg layout the camber was the highest on the West Coast main line and all the curves on the layout are properly done.

If the curves are reversed there was always a straight section in between to allow for the camber to also reverse with a level section in between again the length of the longest vehicle as minimum. On Grayrigg I do have a section which does this. A lot of people do not bother to feature this in what they model, but I have seen examples of what seems quite strong cant on branch lines, depending on curvature and possible line speeds. This is after all a coal railway, but it was well laid out. I like to see trains lean in to the curves when travelling at speed - lovely.

I am sure there will be someone out there who can give more information , even a formula for such things. There could also be detail differences in how the ballast is treated, particularly on modern high speed lines.

Hope that is some help Philip let me know how you get on. :D

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Le Corbusier » Tue Dec 05, 2017 6:39 pm

Allan,

It may not be the place for such a discussion .... but I'm afraid for newbies/thickos :( like me to understand what the hell you are talking about you are going to have to take a few steps back ...perhaps to theory and practice :shock:

Is there a primer to read up about this to save you the trouble?

Tim
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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Philip Hall » Tue Dec 05, 2017 6:46 pm

Thank you Allan, very helpful. My superelevation will be done purely for appearance, so a very slight amount. I too like the look of trains leaning into the curves but as my railway will mostly be viewed from the inside it will not be very apparent. With a layout footprint of 21ft x 20ft, and a minimum radius of 4ft 6ins, that gives about 9ft to put in a gentle reverse curve, so there won’t be that much cant. Also my prototype (Okehampton, with alterations and shrinkage) had hardly any superelevation through the platforms and pointwork, so much relief there...

I guess tracklaying will start early next year so interesting times ahead, particularly given my use of a lot of non-sprung/compensated stock. I am pretty confident all will work OK but I am about to find out!

Philip

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby grovenor-2685 » Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:55 pm

Allan Goodwillie wrote:Hi Philip, :)

I have been laying in my own one this afternoon, not quite finished yet, but will post a picture when finished. Yes as far as I understand the super elevation started on the straight and finished on the straight staying what was set all the way around the curve.

This would apply generally to circular curves, but the normal arrangement on transition curves is to apply the cant along the transition so there would be no cant on the approaching straight and full cant would be reached at the start of the circular curve section.
The transition took into account the theoretical maximum length of the longest stock. When laying my own ones I test with the longest vehicle wheelbase likely and I have a number of wagons uncompensated which I use for the job.
The maximum cant gradient is specified, usually over 2 lengths, eg 3m and 20m the shorter allowing a steepoer gradient, as is the maximum rate of change of cant (mm/sec). Vehicles are designed with suspensions to cope with those specs the gradient limit relating to the twist that the chassis can accomodate, the rate of changerelating to the compliance of the springs. The result is that the length of the cant gradient, and thus the transition curve increases with the maximum line speed.
Of course if the cant gradient has to allow for uncompensated wagons then the limits will have to be restricted to suit the flange depth making the model situation more restrictive than the prototype.
If the curves are reversed there was always a straight section in between to allow for the camber to also reverse with a level section in between again the length of the longest vehicle as minimum.
Again this is applicable to circular curves, transition curves will not have any cant on the straight section. Modern practice prefers to have a straight between transitioned reverse curves but this is not always possible, back to back reverse curves are sometimes used and the cant will be 0 at the point where the curvature reverses.
I am sure there will be someone out there who can give more information , even a formula for such things. There could also be detail differences in how the ballast is treated, particularly on modern high speed lines.

See http://www.norgrove.me.uk/GWRtracknotes/R4423.pdf http://www.norgrove.me.uk/GWRtracknotes/R1759.PDF
http://www.norgrove.me.uk/GWRtracknotes/R1772A.pdf http://www.norgrove.me.uk/GWRtracknotes/R1773.PDF
Modern equivalents are in the Railtrack or Network Rail Track design handbook, google may find it for you.
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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Will L » Tue Dec 05, 2017 11:57 pm

grovenor-2685 wrote: The maximum cant gradient is specified, usually over 2 lengths, eg 3m and 20m the shorter allowing a steepoer gradient, as is the maximum rate of change of cant (mm/sec). Vehicles are designed with suspensions to cope with those specs the gradient limit relating to the twist that the chassis can accomodate, the rate of change relating to the compliance of the springs. The result is that the length of the cant gradient, and thus the transition curve increases with the maximum line speed.
Of course if the cant gradient has to allow for uncompensated wagons then the limits will have to be restricted to suit the flange depth making the model situation more restrictive than the prototype.

I'm aware that the prototype spec is in mm/sec, but I can't help thinking think that's a bit overcomplicated in our world. For our use a simple gradient ratio (i.e. max 1mm in 300) would be good enough, and I've long felt that we ought to be aware of this limitation and build stock able to cope with 1 in 300 (be that by working suspension or depth of flange), and track that doesn't exceed it. I keep on meaning to build a bit of test track to suit, but somehow....
Last edited by Will L on Wed Dec 06, 2017 5:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Allan Goodwillie
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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Wed Dec 06, 2017 1:07 am

Thanks Keith and Will, :D

I thought Keith you just might come up with the figures and be a bit more specific about the types of curves etc, than I have been and have the information already to hand - thank you. :) I am sure it will be helpful both to Philip and others considering putting in cant on the curves. I do have transitional curves on Grayrigg by the way, but was trying to keep my answer fairly simple so that Philip could get a good running result that would have the feel, which fits with your point as well Will I think.

Will thanks for the mention in the Scalefour News by the way pointing others to this thread, I know you were being a bit tongue in cheek :) saying that I might take up sailing instead of attempting lightweight boards, but I do sail already - covered most of the West Coast over the years and it is wonderful :!: However have no fear my system works and I am happy that it does as there has been much thought and time put into it. I have done my fair share of experimental boards over the years so the results here have been arrived at only after a lifetimes modelling.

Coming back to the super elevation, I test everything with uncompensated stock during and after construction, reasoning that if that can be made to work then sprung and compensated stock aught to work even better over the track. It is true that it has to be made more gradual for the reasons Keith has mentioned. Roger Sanders article in the Snooze makes for interesting reading mentioning as it does the way stock moves when at speed.

Don't want to get too involved with all the outs and ins of super elevation here, but it might lead to a thread elsewhere. I will post some photos of the process tomorrow as it may allow others to have a go with an experimental piece prior to trying on the railway. It is not difficult to achieve. ;)

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Philip Hall » Wed Dec 06, 2017 10:43 am

Thanks all for the guidance. I was always going to be very careful with the amount of superelevation, simply because I do intend to use a lot of rigid stock and engines. The length of the transition to the maximum cant will therefore probably be longer than Will’s suggestion to reduce/hopefully remove any problems. I am intending to lay the track flat first (FastTrack) and then experiment with thin paper and card packing where I want the cant. If it works, then I ballast it all, if it doesn't, the packing comes out and I ballast it flat.

Philip

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Wed Dec 06, 2017 4:09 pm

Hi Philip, :)

I use fine parcel string and will post a couple of photos of work in progress, but I am not going to get it finished today, still it is interesting to see just how well it works. I thought I would have today to work on the layout, but my lovely wife had other ideas - well it is Christmas coming along after all.

I have started laying down the track and the string is in place, so even though it is not finished you will be able to see what is involved. I do not know if you have been following my articles in the snooze, but I was once persuaded that using florists wire was a good thing, but found out to my cost that it was not and have since gone back to the method I employed on other layouts long ago - it works and is still the best and can give transition curves as mentioned above. :)

DSC02789.JPG


After I had established the gradients and curves the next thing was to mark where the string was going to go for the super elevation. If I was laying flexi-track it would have been quicker and easier, but this particular curve also had a check rail - remember a locomotive had come off and rolled down the embankment here once before, so this has meant building track in situ, which makes it just a little stickier, but my method was fairly straightforward once started. There is a little super elevation on the NCB line dropping away in the opposite direction, so this too is marked out in string. Placing the string along where the ends of the sleepers are going to go will give a shallower angle of cant than placing the string directly below the rail on the outer side of the curve. It is clear from the photograph that my intention is to put it equal with the outside of the chair as in the WPR mainline in this photograph.

Looking at the NCB line at the bottom of the photograph you can see the string tapering away towards the edge of the ballast and this is how to achieve the drop in the angle of cant - this is now on the straight. Where the string finally comes out from below the sleepers I simply allow the track to find its level and the key to that is the rail itself eventually coming down to the level. The arrow bottom left shows where the track reaches straight.

The Wemyss line has the check rails fitted I found that it was easier to fit them by cutting lengths of 30ft rail one at a time and fitting them into the chairs already attached to a full length of rail. :idea: Trying to work a long length of rail through the chairs when fitted on another long length is very difficult due to friction. I will only cut the rail after everything has been laid and ballasted.

As a general rule I try to avoid transitions taking place above board joints. - only on a straight section would I consider it and it would have to be with both boards set up and being sure of the boards keeping their levels.

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Wed Dec 06, 2017 4:45 pm

Here area few more photos Philip. :)

DSC02784.JPG


This first photo shows a length of track being laid on the curvature of the string. The wagon is an uncompensated one which has a little weight added.

DSC02787.JPG


The second photograph shows me adding sleepers one at a time into place remembering to place the sleepers with the correct spacings for 30ft track which seems to be the majority of the track on my system. Mainly 2 bolt chairs as well.

DSC02786.JPG


I glue the sleepers in place just with a touch of white glue at the ends of each sleeper which can be cut later if I should want to alter things at a later time. :idea:
I am using a set of Exactoscale gauges and note I am using a slight gauge widening - indicated by the single mark in the middle. I solvent the chairs after the glue for the sleepers has set.

DSC02785.JPG


Here the uncompensated wagon takes the curve at an angle as planned.

I might suggest Philip, doing a simple trial first with a spare piece of track a bit of string and your longest unsprung/uncompensated piece of stock. Check the base that you are fitting it to is flat and level. I have a test piece I am using for trailing one or two other ideas.

I do have a trainload of these hopper wagons which runs around Grayrigg Philip they are happy to go around super elevations et al, so it should be possible for you to get it to work - let me know how you get on.

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Philip Hall » Thu Dec 07, 2017 12:12 am

Allan, again many thanks. It will be quite a while before track goes down I think, simply because having emptied one very cluttered workshop and shipped the contents into the new one it is taking quite a while to set things up and work out where to store things! However, most of the baseboards are already up and almost ready to go as they are built into the structure. We only have a long embankment section of board to plan and construct (which is principally where the superlevated sections will be) and a removable section across a doorway.

The first task will be part of the storage sidings, followed by a running line all the way around the room, and I have crossed fingers there will be some trains running in the spring.

Philip

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Thu Dec 07, 2017 8:51 am

Sounds great Philip! :)

It is now a couple of years since I reworked my workshop and now everything is to hand. What a difference it makes having descent storage and proper workspace. The starters group come here to do practical things and given our regular average 4/5 number we can work on practical things - it is nice to see the members getting their own work spaces coming together at home - I know this will end up with building good models as well.

Looking forward to seeing how things come along with your own project. :)

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby IBlenkinsopp » Tue Feb 27, 2018 2:19 pm

Hi Allan, this is probably the wrong place to ask this, I am interested in landsale on the Wemyss, I take it they didn't use bottom door discharge as per the NER and it would be side door. I noticed you did have some ex NER 20 ton wagons are these for redd discharge on the beach? Also would the Wemyss have their own road transport for delivering landsale? I have tried to find answers to this info but with no success. Thanks for your time and sorry to put you to the trouble.

Ian B

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Tue Feb 27, 2018 9:01 pm

Hi Ian, :)

The land sale site at Wemyss seems to be a few sidings where wagons could be distributed to allow coal to be obtained. What I do not know is whether the Wemyss Co. had lorries for coal distribution. Most miners had a regular supply of coal as part of their wage and normally could be seen returning home with a sack of coal on their bikes. What I am not sure of is whether they also collected their coal at the land sale sidings and saved an upward trek from the Michael Colliery. Certainly there was road access and I assume that other materials arrived and were stored there from time to time including stone dust which was a chips and cement mix which was used in the mines to seal internal surfaces. It is still used today on modern railways when resurfacing cuttings - it was interesting watching this at Livingston North during the double line improvements some time ago. :geek:

The 20T NER hoppers were used to take redd away from the MIchael Pit. I personally do not remember them travelling on the main line down to the washer - they would have been no use there as only smaller wagons were of use on the tipper. It would be nice to know if there was redd traffic between the two local pits, the other being Lochead as it would make a difference to what I run on the layout. I have a few wagons of the type to put in the wagon works - I do like a nice hopper wagon and was pleased to learn that the Wemyss had about 200 of them which seems rather too many just for the one Pit. :?: The Wemyss company I think did have lorries as they also had brick works although bricks could be bought and delivered by many of the local builders. My father built his own house back in the 1950's and I think it was Durie the builder who delivered the bricks from Wemyss, they came as a loose load and were dumped in the street. As a small boy I and my sister helped my dad put up walls around the garden.

I will ask around and see if anyone has more info as it is all stuff that may prove useful. I am not going to add these sidings, but will still have to add wagons in as part of the operation of the railway.

Having taken the layout to Glasgow as a work in progress at the weekend it was interesting to hear comments, mainly positive I am happy to say, and it was pleasing to see that the baseboards were as stable as I had hoped. The one area which I would want to improve on is the carrying system, which was a bit of a lash up done at the last minute - however I have put more thought into that since returning and will have a go at a new carrying system. I had also brought along other materials etc. to demonstrate various techniques and had far too much stuff to take away come Sunday!

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby grovenor-2685 » Tue Feb 27, 2018 9:32 pm

I thought Keith you just might come up with the figures and be a bit more specific about the types of curves etc, than I have been and have the information already to hand - thank you. :)

Coming back to this, I thought I had better dig into my files.
Note I did make the GWR track notes available on line ages ago :)
GWR Cant data is here http://www.norgrove.me.uk/GWRtracknotes/R4423.pdf
and here http://www.norgrove.me.uk/GWRtracknotes/R1759.PDF
however there is no mention of the allowable cant gradient which is given here
http://www.norgrove.me.uk/GWRtracknotes/R1772A.pdf
varying from 40ft to 120ft to rise 1” depending on speed.
Other companies would have been similar.

Network Rail has a limit of 1:400 for the cant gradient for all speeds up to 80kph above which a limit of 55 mm/sec applies. Maximum cant is still generally 6 inches. I can supply the abstruse maths if wanted, you might need it if you plan on running Pendolinos flat out.
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Allan Goodwillie
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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Tue Feb 27, 2018 9:46 pm

Thanks Keith, :)
That is very useful information.I believe that Grayrigg had the highest level of cant on the West Coast main line. :)

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Colin Parks » Tue Feb 27, 2018 10:23 pm

Hi Allan,

Looking at your photos showing your method of introducing super-elevationon, I was wondering if you have had any issues with ballasting? Does having ballast under part of the sleeper cause any disturbance to the levels? In my limited experience of layout building, I have never thought about laying track on anything other than a flat surface!

All the best,

Colin

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby allanferguson » Tue Feb 27, 2018 11:09 pm

Allan Goodwillie wrote:Hi Ian, :)

The land sale site at Wemyss seems to be a few sidings where wagons could be distributed to allow coal to be obtained. What I do not know is whether the Wemyss Co. had lorries for coal distribution. Most miners had a regular supply of coal as part of their wage and normally could be seen returning home with a sack of coal on their bikes. What I am not sure of is whether they also collected their coal at the land sale sidings and saved an upward trek from the Michael Colliery.


I had no knowledge of the Wemyss area then, but I did know Kelty well, and in those days (late 1940's) it was the practice to dump a cartload of coal outside every miner's house (i.e. every house). I think once a year. It was up to the miner and his family to get it into the coal cellar. I know -- I was family!
The cart was a two wheeled tip cart, horse drawn, as was virtually everything else in those days.
Also tipped annually was a cartload of dung; the same conditions applied; but it was mostly dug straight into the vegetable garden. We had, I remember, superb crops of rhubarb! I presume this was an arrangement between the householder and the local farmer.

Allan F

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Tue Feb 27, 2018 11:45 pm

Hi Colin :)

I did have problems with the method I used originally on Grayrigg as I followed a different method suggested by someone else and wished I had stuck to my original method which I have used on the new layout. It used florists wire which was problematic due to expansion and contraction problems - I have since replaced this. I have some photographs I have taken showing my method and will post them up this week when I get a bit of time after having the layout at the Glasgow show. It had been promised as a work in progress -similar to the way we took Burntisland a number of years ago - created a lot of interest. Sorry I stopped posting about it as I just had no time before the show. However I will try to catch up this week. You are also making good progress with your own. I used Protofour brass connections on Dubbieside and have never had a failure in all the years - maybe lucky of course, but it has been pretty much everywhere over the 40+ travelling years.

With your method, drilling the rail completely all the way through works best with the solder working all the way through to the railhead by capillary action, rather than just drilling a hole and hoping that the solder will penetrate and flow properly. :) I have found this works well when producing pumps etc. Once filed up N/S wire in N/S rail does not show at all. It is like the trick of soldering on cab number plates by drilling a couple of holes first in the cab side plate.

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby IBlenkinsopp » Wed Feb 28, 2018 7:20 pm

Hi Allan,

Thank-you for getting back to me re land sale on the WPR, It's something that has taken my interest with the view to building a small diorama in fact I actually got round to building some dumb buffered wagons. The Central Farmers' spur seems ripe for a model, I believe that there was a land sale depot there, but https://maps.nls.uk/os/ doesn't throw up anything. Sometimes I think using your imagination is better.
Anyway thanks again, much appreciated. I look forward to seeing Scotts' Road when completed!!
Happy Modelling
Ian B

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Allan Goodwillie
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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Wed Feb 28, 2018 11:26 pm

Hi Ian, :)
some of the wagons that were left in the landsale sidings included the ones shown in the book - I have modelled the vans including some ex-Midland,and some ex-GNOSR. I will try in a couple of days to post something. There is some info on the landsale sites and a mention of different vehicles in the book on the Wemyss System. It can be found in the late chapter on the BR branch going down to Methil. :)

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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Sat Mar 10, 2018 10:15 pm

Well here we are well into March and the layout has been out to its first show - Glasgow as a work in progress. I left off when I was introducing super elevation into the track climbing away on the railways main line. I will not go into the making of the points here as it is covered elsewhere.

https://www.scalefour.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=39&t=5474

Before laying the track I normally just try out the points in the positions intended just to see whether it feels right. What I am looking for is the flow of the railway and just how buildings etc are going to interact in the scene. I prefer to make my buildings first before the track gets laid and seldom make up dummy ones - that takes up time and I can visualise how things look, not necessarily the case for everyone. Time is of the essence and is always a commodity you do not want to waste. I had decided to give the points a quick coating of paint-so I used a coating of enamel brown as a base coat. This will do for just now. The track tends to be laid lightly as I have used floating track on Grayrigg on the lower level. The track base will have to be able to take on a twist when it goes into super elevation. Although this seems contrary to what we think about track laying and that everything must be super level and flat. The base on most of the layout is, but not the super elevated bits.

DSC02736.JPG


Here is a cross-over being tried in position. I mark key sleeper positions and mark where rails are needing cut through. The track is a mix of riveted and chaired. The remaining chairs will be added much later once the layout is up and running and I have had a chance to see if there is anything requiring regauging for example. The rivets are there in key positions to allow alteration if needed. This particular crossover had inside keys on the lower point, which was interlaced, the upper point of the two had obviously been replaced by one using full timbers some time in its life. I am sure you will notice that two of the upper point's timbers are still plain wood. They came off after making in the jig and are here being re-set as part of the point laying. They will be squared up properly before final laying and painted in with the rest. I mark where the point actuators will come up from the board underneath ready for cutting out. There is a certain amount of distortion given the camera angle, but I can see a number of things which might require tweaking once the track is laid and in traffic. This is not as immaculate as Colin's track laying, however I am intending that the track should have some built in faults that still allow the trains to operate. Industrial track often had flaws such s pumping and dog legs etc which made the trucks and engines buck about and I hope to get some of this particularly with the NCB tracks which were not so well maintained. The Wemyss System was better laid and maintained and of course the Buckhaven branch will look even more professional still. :)

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Allan Goodwillie
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Re: Wemyss Private Railway - Scott's Road - Allan Goodwillie

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Sat Mar 10, 2018 10:24 pm

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Here the slots are being cleared for the point actuators. The cork and the top layer of foam board has been cut and is being removed using these rather useful tools which can be bought nowadays. Note other items have been marked including where holes should be drilled for wiring. It is also visible in the photograph to see how the cork has been sanded to shape for the change in gradients and elevation.

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Any cuts and drilled holes are finished off with a sanding block to make sure all is set to the original levels achieved already. Lengths of flexi track can be used as a temporary measure to working out the flow.


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