NAG Workbench - Basic Lathe Course - 10th February 2018

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RobM
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NAG Workbench - Basic Lathe Course - 10th February 2018

Postby RobM » Tue Feb 20, 2018 5:06 pm

Five members of the Group attended this all day session on basic lathe usage with Paul Gittin from
Wakefield as guest participant. Ken Kirk simply got in the way, made tea and took some photographs.
Terry Bendall ran the course at Howard Bolton’s workshop (Bolton Towers) in Derby.
Prior to the course, Terry advised us what to bring in the way of tools. Not all had lathes so other
NAG members kindly offered the use of theirs.
Terry started off with a safety brief and a lathe anatomy lesson. He then demonstrated how to set a
piece of metal (called “the Job”) in the lathe and get it running true.
A demonstration of making a fly cutter came next and then the gang had a go. Terry next showed
them how to make a mandrel to hold a chimney whilst fly cutting. A demonstration of tool grinding
followed in which some had a go. Terry provided a very useful handout showing the tool profiles he
uses. Periodically, Terry would stop them and demonstrate a bit more, thus helping them onto the
next phase. This went on until 4pm when we packed up. All in all, a thoroughly good training
session, so thank you Terry and Howard (plus John for the refreshments).
Ken Kirk Coordinator for NAG.

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http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

waveydavey
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Re: NAG Workbench - Basic Lathe Course - 10th February 2018

Postby waveydavey » Wed Feb 21, 2018 7:43 am

This would have been a very interesting course to attend as I’ve just inherited a small Peatol lathe and have very little idea of what to do with it.

Cheers

David
Modelling Clackmannanshire Railways in 1975
http://waveydaveysmodelmuddle.wordpress.com/

Terry Bendall
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Re: NAG Workbench - Basic Lathe Course - 10th February 2018

Postby Terry Bendall » Mon Feb 26, 2018 4:14 pm

This was the second course that I have run at the request of NAG and I have done a couple of others, one a general open invitation in Bedfordshire and one for the East of Scotland group. There is the possibility of doing the same sort of thing in other areas if there is a demand and a venue can be found. Those attending cover the costs involved including materials and fuel costs for me to get to the venue. Anyone interested can send me a private message. Part of the service from the Society to help members with their model making.

Terry Bendall

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Le Corbusier
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Re: NAG Workbench - Basic Lathe Course - 10th February 2018

Postby Le Corbusier » Mon Feb 26, 2018 5:27 pm

Terry Bendall wrote:This was the second course that I have run at the request of NAG and I have done a couple of others, one a general open invitation in Bedfordshire and one for the East of Scotland group. There is the possibility of doing the same sort of thing in other areas if there is a demand and a venue can be found. Those attending cover the costs involved including materials and fuel costs for me to get to the venue. Anyone interested can send me a private message. Part of the service from the Society to help members with their model making.

Terry Bendall


I for one would be chuffed as hell to attend a demonstration if one could be arranged within a sensible/manageable distance of London. That is a very kind offer Terry.

The caveat being that the date is manageable.

Tim
Tim Lee

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Hardwicke
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Re: NAG Workbench - Basic Lathe Course - 10th February 2018

Postby Hardwicke » Thu Mar 08, 2018 1:50 pm

I'm sorry I wasn't able to attend. My lathe terrifies me as I don't really know what I'm doing. That said, I'm pleased after advice from a fellow patient in hospital in 2016, I've reduced the speed.
Builder of Forge Mill Sidings, Kirkcliffe Coking Plant, Swanage and Heaby. Still trying to "Keep the Balance".

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Flymo748
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Re: NAG Workbench - Basic Lathe Course - 10th February 2018

Postby Flymo748 » Fri Mar 09, 2018 12:01 pm

Hardwicke wrote:I'm sorry I wasn't able to attend. My lathe terrifies me as I don't really know what I'm doing. That said, I'm pleased after advice from a fellow patient in hospital in 2016, I've reduced the speed.


One hopes that it wasn't the lathe speed which put you in hospital...

Cheers
Flymo
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Enigma
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Re: NAG Workbench - Basic Lathe Course - 10th February 2018

Postby Enigma » Fri Mar 09, 2018 1:29 pm

Hardwicke wrote:I'm sorry I wasn't able to attend. My lathe terrifies me as I don't really know what I'm doing. That said, I'm pleased after advice from a fellow patient in hospital in 2016, I've reduced the speed.


Following Terry's workshop I've increased the speed on mine.

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RobM
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Re: NAG Workbench - Basic Lathe Course - 10th February 2018

Postby RobM » Fri Mar 09, 2018 5:11 pm

Slow for steel and cast iron, fast for brass.......
Rob
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

Terry Bendall
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Re: NAG Workbench - Basic Lathe Course - 10th February 2018

Postby Terry Bendall » Sat Mar 10, 2018 9:31 am

RobM wrote:Slow for steel and cast iron, fast for brass.......Rob


Yes but the size of the work piece is also important and the depth of cut. Generally large work is turned at a slow speed and small things at a fast speed. Deep cuts should be done at a slow speed, both in rotation and the rate of feed. Smaller cuts fast speed and faster rate of feed. The same principle applies when drilling.

If you want to, you can look up the recommended rate of feed given in feet per minute or meters per minute and from that work out the rotational speed. In 50 years I have never done that and on small lathes there is little point since it is not easy to find a speed range that matches the outcome of the calculations.

As a guide rates of cutting are
METAL METRES PER MINUTE FEET PER MINUTE
MILD STEEL 22 80
BRASS 60 200
ALUMINIUM 150 300

It is possible to work out the r.p.m. needed by using the formula: N = CS X 1000 divided by Pi x diameter of work. N is the rotational speed in RPM and CS is the cutting speed. I don't like hard sums so I set the speed at what feels and sounds right. :)

My Cowells lathe has a fairly low range of rotational speeds the fastest it will turn is 880 RPM and normally it is left on that speed but sometimes I drop it down to 500 RPM. Most of the small Unimat lathes have a very high range of speeds, often to fast for what we want.

Terry Bendall

John Palmer
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Re: NAG Workbench - Basic Lathe Course - 10th February 2018

Postby John Palmer » Sat Mar 10, 2018 4:09 pm

Terry Bendall wrote:I don't like hard sums so I set the speed at what feels and sounds right. :)

My Cowells lathe has a fairly low range of rotational speeds the fastest it will turn is 880 RPM and normally it is left on that speed but sometimes I drop it down to 500 RPM. Most of the small Unimat lathes have a very high range of speeds, often to fast for what we want.

Terry Bendall


Some years back I thought the original Maier motor for my Unimat 3 was close to giving up the ghost, so I obtained a replacement motor similar to that shown here: https://www.emcomachinetools.co.uk/unimat-4-and-unimat-3-motor-drive-unit-variable-speed-230v1ph50hz - it's a Parvalux motor of a type I think commonly fitted to washing machines. As can be seen, this is a variable speed motor and thus dispenses with the multiple pulley arrangement of the Maier original for speed changing purposes. As a consequence, setting the speed to what sounds and feels right is the only option. Fortunately this was the practice to which I had already become accustomed!

The original Maier motor is only rated for 80% intermittent duty (2 minutes switched off for every 8 minutes running), and a plus point for the replacement is that it is continously rated - quite an advantage when you are laboriously reducing the diameter of a chunky bit of steel bar.


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