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Loctite

Posted: Thu Oct 29, 2020 6:23 pm
by Michael Waldron
I thought this might be useful for other modellers:

Just for the record:
I have contacted Loctite directly today to ask about the most effective anaerobic retainer for us as modellers to use - I didn’t actually state that we are 4mm / 7mm scale modellers (!) - but i did mention gears of brass being fitted to steel (sliver or mild).
It is particularly with regard to the use of Loctite on High Level gearbox brass ‘lump gears’ on the axle.

Their recommendation is:-

648 is definitely the best, though a little viscous - but definitely permanent. It is used in car gearboxes when heat is an issue!!

603 is an updated version of 601 - which, he said, was the best several years ago (!) - and the 2nd best.

Hope that helps.

I’m not sure how that relates to Permabond, or any other make. I have noted Chinese look-alikes which have the sam colour bottle, the same colour labels, but not ‘Loctite’ ... in fact no name at all.

Hope that helps
Mike

Re: Loctite

Posted: Thu Oct 29, 2020 7:29 pm
by 40C
I agree, and have been using Loctite 648 for several years now. It works for me.

Gordon Luck

Re: Loctite

Posted: Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:01 pm
by Tim V
Also note that Loctite has a 'use by' date.

I had some 601 (!) without a 'use by' date on it - I was told this was very old.

The difference between using old (past it) and newer stuff is that the newer stuff works better.

These days I keep an eye on 'use by' dates. For example I write the purchase date on Miliput boxes - along with the disposal date.

Re: Loctite

Posted: Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:06 pm
by nigelcliffe
Yes, there are dates, but those are for "full strength" situations. Important if building an aeroplane, or fitting parts to a motorcycle. Less critical for the gears on a model railway loco.

A certain amount of judgement should be applied.

Re: Loctite

Posted: Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:25 pm
by bécasse
nigelcliffe wrote:Yes, there are dates, but those are for "full strength" situations. Important if building an aeroplane, or fitting parts to a motorcycle. Less critical for the gears on a model railway loco.

A certain amount of judgement should be applied.


I still use Loctite 601 which must be 30+ years old. Providing that the axle/motor shaft and the gear wheel/worm aren't greasy, which isn't difficult if you keep oil away from them beforehand, the bond is more than adequate for model railway purposes - and has the great advantage that it can be broken by boiling water.

It is easy to go for overkill. There are plenty of model railway applications where a little Pritt applied to a hole with a cocktail stick is more than adequate for a permanent bond that can still be easily broken if the need arises. Fixing a flywheel on a motor shaft and ensuring that a screw or nut stays tightly done up are examples (but Pritt its definitely inadequate where gears are concerned).

Re: Loctite

Posted: Sat Oct 31, 2020 12:05 am
by Enigma
I've got a bottle of 601 that I've had for years as well. Still works fine for gears etc. and for securing crank pins in Gibson wheels.

Re: Loctite

Posted: Sat Oct 31, 2020 9:46 am
by davebradwell
Well, my 20year old bottle won't stick anything and before that it could go off suddenly while the joint was being assembled. Will only buy another bottle when I have an immediate application. Biggest problem with the stuff isn't whether it sticks or not (that's usually pretty obvious) but where any excess creeps to as this can stay liquid for a long time. Only ever used as a last resort.

I still can't understand why anyone would stick crankpins in wheels - they're never going to unwind. The Ultrascale type is held together entirely by the nut which should never need sticking on.

DaveB

Re: Loctite

Posted: Sat Oct 31, 2020 5:55 pm
by Enigma
I wear a belt - and I've got some braces as well.

I don't think that I am alone in doing this.