Brassmasters Axle Setting Jig

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steve howe
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Brassmasters Axle Setting Jig

Postby steve howe » Tue Aug 25, 2020 4:17 pm

Hi all,

I have been using my axle setting jig for some time now and found it indispensable for getting axles parallel, I am slightly confused as to how one sets distances of 6", i.e my present project is a GWR heavy Toad 6wheeler, the axle centres are 6' 6" ie. 13' over the outer axles. I'm probably being unusually thick here, but I can't see a way to set the centre axles at 6'6" from the outer. I've solved it to some extent by fixing the outer axles at 13' and then positioning the centre set by measurement but its not ideal. I'm using BB sprung W iron units and the magic 1mm needlepoint axle running in a 2mm tube for the centre set to achieve sideplay - works a treat!

Steve

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jon price
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Re: Brassmasters Axle Setting Jig

Postby jon price » Wed Aug 26, 2020 6:52 am

You could temporarily solder on an extension strip allowing you to set the distance from a surplus axle on the extension strip to the far axle and the center axle, then unsolder the extension strip and axle. Or you could rig the same thing in wood with a fixed offset axle, and a space to hold the chassis.
Connah's Quay Workshop threads: viewforum.php?f=125

garethashenden
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Re: Brassmasters Axle Setting Jig

Postby garethashenden » Wed Aug 26, 2020 2:01 pm

While it has a 6' option, its really designed for wheelbases in the 8' to 12' range. What you've done is probably the best option.

markdavy
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Re: Brassmasters Axle Setting Jig

Postby markdavy » Wed Aug 26, 2020 3:01 pm

Since you are using Bill Bedford w-iron units, another option is to use a Palatine Models Wagon Baseplate, available from the S4 Stores.

Using the longer version (WGB02), the centre w-iron would be attached at the mid-point of the baseplate. The outer w-irons would then be attached using the 13ft holes, i.e. 6’6” either side of the mid-point.

I intend to use this baseplate to set BB w-irons to the 9’9” wheelbase for later LNWR wagons.

The baseplates are also suitable for Masokits w-irons.

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Paul Willis
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Re: Brassmasters Axle Setting Jig

Postby Paul Willis » Wed Aug 26, 2020 8:54 pm

steve howe wrote:I have been using my axle setting jig for some time now and found it indispensable for getting axles parallel, I am slightly confused as to how one sets distances of 6"


Hi Steve,

You ask a question with the answer in two parts... First the obvious one, and then the not so obvious one!

Firstly the obvious. You're talking about this jig? It's one that I use all the time, and it is indeed absolutely invaluable:

Brassmasters.JPG


Brassmasters original.JPG


So for normal "six inch" increments, you use this slot here marked 1'6" :

Brassmasters -six inch hole.JPG


You combine it by adding 1'6" to whatever the measurement is at the right hand end of the jig. So for 8'6" it's this combination:

Brassmasters  ft 6.JPG


steve howe wrote:i.e my present project is a GWR heavy Toad 6wheeler, the axle centres are 6' 6" ie. 13' over the outer axles. I'm probably being unusually thick here, but I can't see a way to set the centre axles at 6'6" from the outer. I've solved it to some extent by fixing the outer axles at 13' and then positioning the centre set by measurement but its not ideal. I'm using BB sprung W iron units and the magic 1mm needlepoint axle running in a 2mm tube for the centre set to achieve sideplay - works a treat!


Now this is where it gets mysterious... The lowest marked wheelbase is 6', so (1'6" + 6') = 7'6", which is 4mm longer than you need.

But there is this unmarked slot in the middle of the jig:

Brassmasters Unexplained hole.JPG


Which having measured the distance to the adjoining 6' slot, is 6mm, or also 1'6". So if you read "6'" as "1'6" ", and count up from there, this gives you a wheelbase of 6'6" :

Brassmasters 8 ft 6.JPG


For your six-wheel vehicle challenge, I'd firmly fix the middle axle in the centre of the length of the vehicle, then when that is solidly firm, use the jig to set each end in turn to fix the two outer axles in turn, distanced from the centre.

Brassmasters 8 ft 6 - Copy.JPG


Does that make sense? Or did I misunderstand the "ask"?

Cheers
Paul
Beware of Trains - occasional modelling in progress!
www.5522models.co.uk

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steve howe
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Re: Brassmasters Axle Setting Jig

Postby steve howe » Thu Aug 27, 2020 12:32 pm

Thanks Paul and chaps, :thumb :thumb I did wonder about the 1' 6" slot, but couldn't work out how it related to the rest, now resolved! I have both jigs, the longer and short, and find them generally very useful, most of the running problems on my early P4 builds were subsequently traced to non-parallel axles.

Steve

garethashenden
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Re: Brassmasters Axle Setting Jig

Postby garethashenden » Fri Aug 28, 2020 3:02 pm

The unlabeled slot is designed to go over an existing brake cross shaft on a 9' wheelbase wagon. Not sure how useful a feature that is, but that's what its for.

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Paul Willis
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Re: Brassmasters Axle Setting Jig

Postby Paul Willis » Fri Aug 28, 2020 5:03 pm

garethashenden wrote:The unlabeled slot is designed to go over an existing brake cross shaft on a 9' wheelbase wagon. Not sure how useful a feature that is, but that's what its for.


Thank you! Mystery solved...

Although as you say, I'm unsure how useful it is in practice. In 1909, relatively few wagons had dual-sided brakes or levers, so cross-shafts are notable by their absence on my wagon fleet.

OTSOW, I will be finishing the brake gear on three Coopercraft O5 wagons this evening. All satisfactorily fiddly doing etched brass replacements for the plastic bits :-)

Cheers
Paul
Beware of Trains - occasional modelling in progress!
www.5522models.co.uk


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