Eames 40 flux

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steve howe
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Eames 40 flux

Postby steve howe » Mon Jun 10, 2019 9:41 pm

I am getting to the end of my last bottle of Eames '40' flux (yes I did buy a stash when they were closing down) I think it is still a great product with very little corrosive effect on steel. Can anyone suggest a suitable substitute? I seem to remember Iain Rice writing some years ago about home-brewed fluxes using distilled water, isopropyl and phosphoric acid (about 10- 12% if I recall) I don't know what the phosphoric acid content in the old Eames product was, but it is a very effective flux.

Steve

JFS
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Re: Eames 40 flux

Postby JFS » Tue Jun 11, 2019 8:15 am

I am by no means certain here Steve, but I seem to recall that the "40" refers to 40% phosphoric acid, People might foam at the mouth at such a high percentage, but phosphoric acid is a very weak acid (it is a food stuff after all). Its low level of water explains its low corrosive effect on steel - it is the water which causes the rust: phosphoric acid is a "rust converter" - the active ingredient in "Jenolite" is ortho-phosophoric acid.

By way of an alternative to try, I would suggest Carrs "Brown", which is also a high concentration phosphoric acid. (hence it is a bit on the dear side). I originally bought some of this for soldering stainless steel rail for which (apart from having a tarring effect on ply sleepers if over-dosed) it was great. I then found it worked for everything else.
It is a bit pricey (though you can make your own up as 85% phosophoric acid is easily available - it looks a bit like lard...) but you only need a TINY amount and, unlike high-water fluxes, it does not fizz and spit and splash everywhere else and disappear before the job is done etc ...

Best Wishes,

Philip Hall
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Re: Eames 40 flux

Postby Philip Hall » Tue Jun 11, 2019 8:28 am

I have used a home brew of about 7-12% phosphoric acid and distilled water (with a touch of isopropyl alcohol) almost for ever and it is still my favourite. It’s getting low now so I need to brew some more sometime. Doing it yourself is hugely cheaper than buying little bottles of the stuff.

Philip

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steve howe
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Re: Eames 40 flux

Postby steve howe » Tue Jun 11, 2019 9:12 am

That's very useful thank you chaps. So for a 10% solution is it (say) 90mls of water to 10mls of Phosphoric with a squirt of Iso.? Can I ask where you get your phosphoric acid from Phil, I would like to give this a try. As JFS says, 40% does seem a bit strong! but maybe worth experimenting with.

Steve

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Paul Townsend
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Re: Eames 40 flux

Postby Paul Townsend » Tue Jun 11, 2019 9:47 am

Loads on Ebay.
I have used home brew for years, recipe as in Phil's quote

martin goodall
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Re: Eames 40 flux

Postby martin goodall » Thu Jun 13, 2019 6:54 pm

I am told that Cola can be an effective emergency flux (due to its phosphoric acid content)!

However, if you want a less sticky solution, phosphoric acid flux is readily available from various hobby suppliers, without the need to brew your own.

Most on offer seem to be about 12%, which gives you a fairly versatile flux for most jobs. This compares with the old Eames '40' flux, which I believe was a 6% solution primarily intended for soldering whitemetal with 70-degree low-melt ('Cerrobend').

Philip Hall
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Re: Eames 40 flux

Postby Philip Hall » Thu Jun 13, 2019 6:58 pm

Steve, sorry I’ve no idea where to get it. It was a long while ago. I shall try our local chemist first. I seem to recall the iso alcohol was more of a problem last time.

Philip

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steve howe
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Re: Eames 40 flux

Postby steve howe » Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:08 pm

Out of interest, I did a bit of searching and found this supplier on Amazon:

APC Pure
Unit 2B
East Tame Business Park
Rexcine Way
Hyde
Cheshire SK14 4GX
E: info@apcpure.com
W: www.apcpure.com

Very prompt delivery, they also sell isopropyl:
https://apcpure.com/product/isopropyl-alcohol-99-9-acs

I think Tamiya thinners is basically isopropyl.

Just need to get the distilled water now!


Steve

Philip Hall
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Re: Eames 40 flux

Postby Philip Hall » Fri Jun 14, 2019 8:07 pm

I was in our local chemist this morning and they confirmed what I suspected, that they cannot supply phosphoric acid or IPA at all now. They suggested online, so thank you, Steve.

Philip

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Guy Rixon
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Re: Eames 40 flux

Postby Guy Rixon » Sat Jun 15, 2019 7:50 am

steve howe wrote:Out of interest, I did a bit of searching and found this supplier on Amazon:
I think Tamiya thinners is basically isopropyl.
Steve

Yes, but there's some butanol in it too, possibly to stop it drying too quickly when airbrushing.

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steve howe
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Re: Eames 40 flux

Postby steve howe » Sat Jun 15, 2019 10:15 am

Philip Hall wrote:I was in our local chemist this morning and they confirmed what I suspected, that they cannot supply phosphoric acid or IPA at all now. They suggested online, so thank you, Steve.

Philip


Yes Chemists' aint wot they used to be. I wanted some citric acid the other day for our elderflower cordial recipe
and they refused to sell it and were quite 'arsey' with me. I later found out from the healthfood shop where I subsequently bought 200gms without bother, that its popular with druggies for cutting heroin..... the times we live in! :roll:

steve


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