A replacement for super glue?

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Simon Glidewell
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A replacement for super glue?

Postby Simon Glidewell » Thu Dec 04, 2014 9:34 pm

I saw this on Facebook today; billed as a possible replacement for super glue.

http://gizmodo.com/super-glues-got-noth ... socialflow

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jim s-w
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Re: A replacement for super glue?

Postby jim s-w » Sat Dec 06, 2014 4:40 pm

If its between 2 parts how does the light get in to set it? Bit confused!

Crepello
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Re: A replacement for super glue?

Postby Crepello » Sat Dec 06, 2014 7:47 pm

jim s-w wrote:If its between 2 parts how does the light get in to set it? Bit confused!

I followed up by visiting the manufacturer's website, where they illustrate its use. They do warn it should not be thought of as glue, more as a welding material. Indeed, they show a butt joint prepared with a penetration gap, just as when welding metal panels.
So, while not a direct substitute for cyano, no doubt other applications will be dreamed up. If it has a low viscosity, perhaps casting small detail components in RTV could be a goer.

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jim s-w
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Re: A replacement for super glue?

Postby jim s-w » Sat Dec 06, 2014 8:13 pm

It does sound handy as an instant filler.

dal-t
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Re: A replacement for super glue?

Postby dal-t » Sun Dec 07, 2014 9:14 am

I wonder if this is a development of the material used for windscreen repairs? 'Superglue' that sets on exposure to UV (daylight component usually sufficient) has, of course, been around for years, recommended for bonding to glass (or, in 50% of the cases where I use it, not bonding to glass).
David L-T

mikewturner
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Re: A replacement for super glue?

Postby mikewturner » Sun Dec 07, 2014 7:30 pm

jim s-w wrote:It does sound handy as an instant filler.


Hi Jim

I think Tamiya do a uv cured filler but might be wrong?

Regards

Mike

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Will L
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Re: A replacement for super glue?

Postby Will L » Sun Dec 07, 2014 9:12 pm

mikewturner wrote:I think Tamiya do a uv cured filler but might be wrong?


Dentists have been using UV cured resins as a basis for tooth fillers for a while, and they seem to stick to my teeth effectively. I can't see why the same technology shouldn't make a good glue. They go off very quick and typically you only need to trigger the polymerising reaction at the surface to set the whole lot.

GMaslin
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Re: A replacement for super glue?

Postby GMaslin » Fri May 22, 2015 3:01 pm

My main reason for responding to this thread is to say that using this UV sensitive resin for small castings in RTV won't be a goer unless you can come up with a way of getting UV light inside the mould' unmless of course it's a one part mould where the resin is exposed. Two part polyurethane resin (Fastcast) is perfectly satisfactory for casting large and small parts in RTV moulds as it has low viscosity and is quite tough when set. I've also used polyester resin but that is too brittle when set, and also liquid epoxy resin, but that's a bit too viscous and it tends to eat into RTV after a few casts.

There's a lot of common ground between dentists and model makers. I've scrounged quite a few worn out instruments of torture from my dentists in the past and when my mouth's not jammed open I frequently have conversations with my current dentist about the merits of various moulding materials - silicone RTV, alginate etc. About ten years ago my then dentist started mixing some stuff up out of sight behind me and the smell of it took me straight back another 40 years to the mid sixties when I used the same two part acrylic moulding material (powder + liquid) for fixing explosives and detonators into experimental rigs. My favourite job ever! The stuff was called Simplex and I think it was made by ICI.

jasp
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Joined: Thu Dec 04, 2008 9:24 am

Re: A replacement for super glue?

Postby jasp » Sat May 23, 2015 8:24 pm

I am sorry that I missed Will's piece from last December as I can provide further info on the materials to which he refers.
These are composite materials comprising a resin plus various fillers.
The resins are polymerised using visible blue light (40 years or so on from UV cured resins) and are bonded to tooth tissue by a combination of means: to enamel by mainly mechanical attachment via tags of resin penetrating the etched enamel surface with some chemical bonding,, denting via chemical bonding. (a somewhat simplified explanation)
Some resin systems are "dual-cure", initiated by visible blue light and completed by chemical auto-polymerisation.
The materials are VERY expensive, not actually adhesive in themselves and probably too rigid and brittle for our use.
Re instruments and burs (not "burrs") broken instruments can sometimes be obtained from your dentist and, provided they are suitably decontaminated and sterilised, pose no risk of infection. They are readily ground to useful shapes. Burs again can be useful and steel burs are available and fairly cheap. Many sizes and shapes are available - ask your dentist.
Other useful "dental" materials including waxes, gypsum products (plaster of Paris based) auto polymerising acrylic resins. Many are ridiculously expensive but, nevertheless, sometimes useful.
Sadly Dental Materials Science is viewed by many students as probably the most boring part of the undergraduate course, largely, I believe, as it is taught as a stand-alone theoretical subject and not as "applied" dental materials, directly related to the clinical elements of the course.
Jim P


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