Solder paint resurrection

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johnp

Solder paint resurrection

Postby johnp » Tue Oct 15, 2013 4:15 pm

Is it possible to resurrect some solder paint that has dried out?

Regards,

John

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Paul Willis
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Re: Solder paint resurrection

Postby Paul Willis » Tue Oct 15, 2013 5:08 pm

johnp wrote:Is it possible to resurrect some solder paint that has dried out?

I've done it successfully, but the key point is "how far has it gone?".

Mine was like a very thick sludge, just starting to go solid on the top. It's a jar of Carr's 188, which must be at least 20 years old.

I added, small amounts at a time, Green Label flux, and stirred it in thoroughly with an old screwdriver. I took the time to make it smooth and remove the lumps. A bit like baking a cake! It's now as good as new, and there is still a third of the pot left for more kits :-)

I suspect that if it has gone to the point of being solid so that you have to chip lumps off it, it's too far gone :-(

HTH
Flymo
Beware of Trains - occasional modelling in progress!
www.5522models.co.uk

johnp

Re: Solder paint resurrection

Postby johnp » Tue Oct 15, 2013 7:28 pm

Hi! Flymo,

It is solid and is also Carr's. It has scraped to a powder so far but I do not have any Green label flux. I only have Orange label flux available.

Regards,

John

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Paul Willis
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Re: Solder paint resurrection

Postby Paul Willis » Tue Oct 15, 2013 7:51 pm

johnp wrote:It is solid and is also Carr's. It has scraped to a powder so far but I do not have any Green label flux. I only have Orange label flux available.

That may well work :-)

What's the worst that can happen? It's not like the world is going to end if you mix the two together. To avoid wasting too much, I'd just try a little and see if you can make a suitable goop on the surface, a bit like using a block of watercolour paint, or making Japanese tea in the traditional manner.

BTW, if you want to have an amusing read about things that you mix together and the world *may* end, a friend pointed me at this earlier today:

http://pipeline.corante.com/archives/things_i_wont_work_with/

Cheers
Flymo
Beware of Trains - occasional modelling in progress!
www.5522models.co.uk

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Guy Rixon
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Re: Solder paint resurrection

Postby Guy Rixon » Wed Oct 16, 2013 12:29 pm

I have diluted some old solder-paint (Eileen's product) with plain tap-water, on the assumption that the active part of the flux is not lost by evaporation but concentrates as the paste dries. It works as well now as it ever did.

nigelcliffe
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Re: Solder paint resurrection

Postby nigelcliffe » Wed Oct 16, 2013 2:07 pm

I agree with Guy - use water, its the water which has evaporated.
Depending on the other things in your local water (hard vs soft, etc. which may react with the acid flux), then use of either filtered rainwater or distilled water may be sensible.

johnp

Re: Solder paint resurrection

Postby johnp » Wed Oct 16, 2013 3:45 pm

Thank you, gentlemen.

We have quite soft water so I will give that a try. If not I have a bottle of de-ionised water somewhere!

That web site makes me shiver at the risks we used to take as school boys in the days when chemicals in the lab were readily available!

Some of my fellow pupils made some nitro glycerine - it isn't difficult - just very dangerous! They set it off by lobbing some stones onto the test tube.

Regards,

John

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David B
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Re: Solder paint resurrection

Postby David B » Thu Oct 17, 2013 8:03 am

johnp wrote: . . . makes me shiver at the risks we used to take as school boys in the days when chemicals in the lab were readily available!


I recall the fascination with mercury, rolling it around in one's hands. It was also left for days in open dishes.

There was also a substance that got spilled on a windowsill. It was wiped up but some clearly got underneath the tiles because when it dried, it exploded and blasted the tiles off.

Happy days??

Chris Mitton
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Re: Solder paint resurrection

Postby Chris Mitton » Thu Oct 17, 2013 3:22 pm

johnp wrote:That web site makes me shiver at the risks we used to take as school boys in the days when chemicals in the lab were readily available!

I still get the shivers when I think of my first chemistry lesson, aged eleven, wondering what the rack of brightly coloured liquids in front of each bench was for. Concentrated Nitric Acid, Potassium Ferro-Cyanide, Potassium Permanganate...there must have been a couple of dozen lethal substances within reach.
johnp wrote:Some of my fellow pupils made some nitro glycerine - it isn't difficult - just very dangerous! They set it off by lobbing some stones onto the test tube.

A couple of my school colleagues once made some ethyl bromide (aka tear gas) early one morning, and left it wafting round the back of the stage shortly before the headmaster arrived for morning assembly....

Happy days before H&S!
Regards
Chris


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