WYAG News 2012

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James Moorhouse
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WYAG News 2012

Postby James Moorhouse » Tue Jan 24, 2012 3:02 pm

On Tuesday 17th January WYAG members met at the home of Dave Carter for our first meeting of 2012. This meeting was a project night. Below is a selection of images from the evening just to give you an idea of the range of skills and interests within the area group.

wyag-17-01-a.JPG

Left: In a previous post I mentioned Keith Bradbury's sprung wagon chassis, but was unable to provide an image. Keith showed us a trio of wagon chassis along with the Pal-van bodies under which they are destined to be fitted. He uses various parts from the Masokits range to build his wagon chassis: here we see an amalgam of sprung subframe, Morton brake gear and BR standard W-irons. Guitar string is the springing medium used in the Masokit's sprung subframe kit (as opposed to etched stainless steel which is used in the individual sprung W-irons), which Keith prefers as this allows him to change the diameter of the guitar string until the correct deflection of the spring under load is achieved.
Right: Murray Franklin brought a model of a GW diagram G.19 Hydra that he had built from the Pocket Money kit. Dissatisfied with the 4mm kit instructions, Murray downloaded the 7mm version which were more detailed but proved to be just as relevant. I believe the artwork used for many of the kits in the 4mm Pocket Money range were scaled down from their 7mm originals.

wyag-17-01-b.JPG

Left: Ian Clark had recently purchased a pair of Hornby Gresley 51ft coaches. Having passed around the first, unmodified, coach, Ian was able to demonstrate what a difference a little subtle weathering makes when he pulled out the second, modified, coach. The out-of-the-box Hornby model has a white roof. We speculated how long such a roof would have remained white on the prototype; the general consensus was "about five minutes" and quite appropriately Ian had given his roof a good, grimy going-over.
Right: Jim Pitchford showed the group his dia. 116 NER autocoach which had been built from the D&S kit. The interior had been fully fitted out. Jim was also working on a G6 to pull/push his coach.

wyag-17-01-c.JPG

Left: Derek Mathers showed us the progress he had made with the High Level pannier chassis kit. Derek had made use of three different GW Models tools to gauge, quarter and disassemble (sounds gruesome) the 4' 71/2" diameter wheels. Derek liked the GW Models back to back gauge as he said it provided positive gauging, in that the entire rear faces of the wheels were in contact with the gauge, whilst providing adequate room for the gearbox and hornblocks.
Right: Steve Hall presented some nostalgic models he had built from Parkside kits. Steve explained that mining hopper wagons were built at Hudson's Foundry in Gildersome which was rail connected to the ex-GNR route between Bradford and Wakefield. He told us that he used to see a train of standard gauge open goods wagons each afternoon on his way home from school at Morley; each open wagon loaded with three narrow gauge tipper wagons sideways on.
His justification for running them on Drighlington is that a pick up goods ran from Ardsley to Laisterdyke (Bradford) calling at Gildersome and then Drighlington, so could well include a couple of wagons loaded with NG tipplers bound for a quarry in the Skipton/Grassington area, or beyond.

wyag-17-01-d.JPG

Left: Brian Eves has been working on some modifications to the signal control systems on Dewsbury Central in order to incorporate servos for signal arm actuation. Brian explains:
"Signal control from the operator’s panel on Dewsbury is by a switch 12V feed. The "switched" part will / does form a simple interlocking function. MERG Servo4 boards require a volt free contact. The board supplies the current that flows through the switch. Therefore unless I make changes to layout and panel wiring an additional interface between the two is required (this is what the image portrays). My solution is to use a quad opto-isolator (sometimes known as an optocoupler) to switch the Servo4 inputs. This is a device that has four individual channels that isolate the control panel from the Servo4 board. The opto-isolator I've bought is from Farnell Electronics. I've used the AC input variety that has two LEDs back to back which when turned on operates a photo transistor. A series resistor limits the 12V switched feed to something that the chip can handle. This chip requires no power, has sixteen pins, and fits into standard DIL (dual in line) sockets."
Right: The standard means of supporting servos on Dewsbury.

wyag-17-01-e.JPG

Left: Wheel eccentricity and wobble is, to a greater or lesser extent, present in all our model wheels. In order to limit the impact these factors have on the running of our models, we set ourselves tolerances, a degree of sloppiness which we regard as being acceptable. However, some difficulty can arise in assessing whether our model wheels fall within the accepted tolerance. Therefore Dave has produced a device which allows readings to be taken, via a dial test indicator, of the level of eccentricity and wobble existing within a given wheel. Dave says if a wheel does not fall within a given tolerance it's either disposed of or sent back to the manufacturer.
Right: James Dickie brought a constructed Dave Bradwell standard brake van chassis to the meeting. He discussed the problems of fitting brake van bodies, both RTR and kit forms, onto the chassis. For instance, the Bachmann body is 2mm too short. However, he praised highly the Bradwell kit and I think the quality of both the kit and James' incredibly neat work speaks for itself.
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James Moorhouse
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Re: WYAG News 2012

Postby James Moorhouse » Tue Jan 24, 2012 3:26 pm

Here is the WYAG programme of events for spring:

21st February - Layout electrics, an illustrated talk by Brian Eves.
20th March - The latest developments at Wizard, 51L and Model Signal Engineering, by Andrew Hartshorn.
17th April - Running night on Drighlington and Adwalton.
15th May - The outing. Details yet to be finalized.
19th June - Low Moor Footplate Man, reminiscences by Granville Dobson.

Meetings are held on Tuesdays and start at around 2000. Our group organizer is Dave Carter. If you are interested in attending any of them, contact details for Dave can be found here: http://www.scalefour.org/forum/digests_download.php?f=bluesheet.pdf
Alternatively you can PM me via the forum.

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Re: WYAG News 2012

Postby craig_whilding » Wed Jan 25, 2012 9:05 am

James Moorhouse wrote:He discussed the problems of fitting brake van bodies, both RTR and kit forms, onto the chassis. For instance, the Bachmann body is 2mm too short. However, he praised highly the Bradwell kit and I think the quality of both the kit and James' incredibly neat work speaks for itself.

I found the Bachmann body a perfect match when I mated it to a Bradwell chassis. Along with the concrete weights it fitted correctly on top of the headstocks. I agree his soldering is a lot neater than my example though!

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Paul Townsend
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Re: WYAG News 2012

Postby Paul Townsend » Wed Jan 25, 2012 10:48 am

James Moorhouse said re wheel wobble test........
Dave says if a wheel does not fall within a given tolerance it's either disposed of or sent back to the manufacturer


And what figure was adopted as acceptable limit?

This measuring rig is a good idea but even better would be if someone came up with a go/nogo tester like the S4 gravity back-back gauge.

Spin the wheels slowly in a monting jig like that used in WYAG and insert a device into the gap which has a hardened blunt point at each end set to be apart by the [(B-B) - tolerance]. There should be no contact but any contact would brake the spin.
With unblackened and so conductive tyres I would make it electrical like a split axle so a meter reading ohms across it would blip on contact or a current could light an led or buzzer.

Just thinking aloud...comments?

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Wizard of the Moor
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Re: WYAG News 2012

Postby Wizard of the Moor » Wed Jan 25, 2012 7:50 pm

craig_whilding wrote:
James Moorhouse wrote:He discussed the problems of fitting brake van bodies, both RTR and kit forms, onto the chassis. For instance, the Bachmann body is 2mm too short. However, he praised highly the Bradwell kit and I think the quality of both the kit and James' incredibly neat work speaks for itself.

I found the Bachmann body a perfect match when I mated it to a Bradwell chassis. Along with the concrete weights it fitted correctly on top of the headstocks. I agree his soldering is a lot neater than my example though!


I had a chance to look at this over the weekend.

The problem is that the kit provides etched strips to represent the rivetted bracing right at the ends of the body. In my enthusiasm, I fitted these without thinking of adjusting the fit of body to chassis. To be fair, this was before the Bachmann van was released...

When I dismantled the Bachmann van, I cut off the corresponding rivetted strips from the end platforms. The leaves the remaining body 1mm (not 2mm as previously stated - sorry!) too short to fit between the etched strips.

If using an unaltered Bachmann body then it is a gnat's crotchet too short for the chassis.

So, either Dave's strips are too narrow or Bachmann's are too wide. At some point I should count the rivets, I suppose :geek:

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Dave K
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Re: WYAG News 2012

Postby Dave K » Thu Jan 26, 2012 9:23 am

James Moorhouse wrote:Right: Murray Franklin brought a model of a GW diagram G.19 Hydra that he had built from the Pocket Money kit. Dissatisfied with the 4mm kit instructions, Murray downloaded the 7mm version which were more detailed but proved to be just as relevant. I believe the artwork used for many of the kits in the 4mm Pocket Money range were scaled down from their 7mm originals.

I've been struggling to build one of these for some time and with no photo of one the project is now on the back burned. I have to see if I can get a copy of the 7mm instruction and maybe I can it get finished.

James Moorhouse wrote:Left: Derek Mathers showed us the progress he had made with the High Level pannier chassis kit. Derek had made use of three different GW Models tools to gauge, quarter and disassemble (sounds gruesome) the 4' 71/2" diameter wheels. Derek liked the GW Models back to back gauge as he said it provided positive gauging, in that the entire rear faces of the wheels were in contact with the gauge, whilst providing adequate room for the gearbox and hornblocks.

I've nearly finished one of the High Level 14xx chassis and the next one is be a Pannier. The only problem I've found is that, as built as per the instructions, the etched springs and other bits on the 14xx chassis mean it is not possible to remove the wheels/motor gearbox from the frames. And I can't see from the photo if the etched springs have been removed or not. Could you please as Mr Mathers how he has built the chassis.

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James Moorhouse
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Re: WYAG News 2012

Postby James Moorhouse » Thu Jan 26, 2012 5:06 pm

paultownsend wrote:
James Moorhouse said re wheel wobble test........
Dave says if a wheel does not fall within a given tolerance it's either disposed of or sent back to the manufacturer


And what figure was adopted as acceptable limit?

This was one of the first questions I put to Dave at the meeting. However, Dave seemed somewhat reluctant to specify a figure at the time. To be fair to him he had only just built this checking device. Thinking about it, if working to P4 tolerances, where minimum BB is 17.67 mm and maximum is 17.75 mm, would +/- 0.02 mm seem an appropriate tolerance for wheel wobble per wheel?

Perhaps my quickly hashed diagram would explain. Although the fit of the axle in the bore of the wheel is not the only factor attributed to wheel wobble, it is used here to illustrate the effect, where both wheels are at their maximum tolerance of wobble.

wheel-wobble.GIF
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I am personally not too sure about the virtues of Dave's wobble detector. I believe the best means to detect wheel wobble is by eye. By rolling a wheelset slowly on a flat surface, much can be detected regarding its eccentricity and inherent wobble.

paultownsend wrote: With unblackened and so conductive tyres I would make it electrical like a split axle so a meter reading ohms across it would blip on contact or a current could light an led or buzzer.
Just thinking aloud...comments?

I like the idea, and I've considered something similar to ascertain correct height setting for working third and fourth rail pick-up shoes, but in terms of measuring back to back dimensions you're talking about producing a piece of precision measuring equipment that would need to be calibrated very accurately and also kept spotlessly clean in order that the contacts pick up.
I have often thought that a contactless measuring device, such as a travelling microscope, would be good for remotely checking actual back to back dimensions. I'm thinking here about having a bay in the fiddle yard for checking back to backs without the need for lifting stock off the track: I consider handling of stock to be the biggest factor in wear and tear on our models.

dave k wrote:I've nearly finished one of the High Level 14xx chassis and the next one is be a Pannier. The only problem I've found is that, as built as per the instructions, the etched springs and other bits on the 14xx chassis mean it is not possible to remove the wheels/motor gearbox from the frames. And I can't see from the photo if the etched springs have been removed or not. Could you please as Mr Mathers how he has built the chassis.

I can confirm that the springs have been removed. I will lean on Derek for some more information on his chassis and post it on here. I'm fairly sure Derek isn't active on the forum.
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Paul Townsend
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Re: WYAG News 2012

Postby Paul Townsend » Sat Feb 11, 2012 9:06 am

James Moorhouse wrote:And what figure was adopted as acceptable limit?

Perhaps my quickly hashed diagram would explain. Although the fit of the axle in the bore of the wheel is not the only factor attributed to wheel wobble, it is used here to illustrate the effect, where both wheels are at their maximum tolerance of wobble.

I believe the best means to detect wheel wobble is by eye. By rolling a wheelset slowly on a flat surface, much can be detected regarding its eccentricity and inherent wobble.


Ta for figures and the diagram, very helpful, sorry about delayed response, excuses elsewhere....

With unblackened and so conductive tyres I would make it electrical like a split axle so a meter reading ohms across it would blip on contact or a current could light an led or buzzer......
I like the idea, but in terms of measuring back to back dimensions you're talking about producing a piece of precision measuring equipment that would need to be calibrated very accurately and also kept spotlessly clean in order that the contacts pick up.


The accuracy is same as any back to back gauge so not hugely challenging, GW Models' universal BB gadget could be a starting point, then some gold wire to provide the probe tips would avoid the worst contact corrosion issues.....ISTR someone recommending gold tips on scaper pickups yonks ago.

I have often thought that a contactless measuring device, such as a travelling microscope, would be good for remotely checking actual back to back dimensions. I'm thinking here about having a bay in the fiddle yard for checking back to backs without the need for lifting stock off the track: I consider handling of stock to be the biggest factor in wear and tear on our models.


Travelling microscope sounds expensive. I like the test bay idea, agree re stock handling.
Which brings me to another hobbyhorse...loco wheel cleaning.
There are products on the market or DiY designs for at least 6 methods of track cleaning, I have tried 5 and several work quite well but all have issues so its horses for courses, but this is a more or less solved problem.
Backrus make a useful gadget for stock wheel cleaning which could be adapted into your test bay to reduce handling.
We now need a design based on these ideas which will clean loco wheels in your test bay too.
I have a few ideas but a severe shortage of roundtuits!

I submit that this is the last BIG remaining hurdle in our hobby on the roads to perfection.

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James Moorhouse
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Re: WYAG News 2012

Postby James Moorhouse » Mon Mar 26, 2012 10:15 am

Yet again I’m apologising for the absence of last month’s meeting report. Brian Eves gave a talk on layout wiring, but he didn’t manage to finish it due to the inundation of questions and discussion throughout the talk. Brian works on the railway as a wrong side failure investigator, in an environment where you cannot afford to take chances with wiring, so somewhat naturally Brian has some very high standards when it comes to wiring layouts. With my new hat on I’m a bit reluctant to go into too much detail here – I’m hoping Brian will do a series in the Scalefour News on layout wiring.

Here are the main areas covered in the first half of Brian’s talk:

• Attitudes to wiring layouts
• Distribution of power, wiring feeds, buses and isolation
• Types of wire
• Relays
• Tags and how to correctly attach wire to them
• Crimps versus soldered connections
• Cable markers
• Connectors


This month’s WYAG meeting was held at the home of Derek Mathers and was a talk by Andrew Hartshorn of Wizard Models. Andrew started his talk by telling us about his background and how he came to buy Model Signal Engineering in 1998. The original business was set up by Derek Mundy around 1980, but has been much developed and expanded since Andrew took over; in 2006 Andrew bought Wizard Models from Peter Heald and since then the whole business has been called Wizard Models and incorporated MSE, Spratt and Winkle, Chowbent and 51L.

Andrew described how most of the manufacturing of his products is outsourced. A number of different manufacturing processes are used including etching, white metal casting, lost wax brass casting, resin casting and milling. Andrew told us that he produces his own artwork in MS Paint, but at a very high resolution since it is a pixel based computer program. The latest MSE RTR signals are being produced in India and Andrew maintains a good relationship with his Asian manufacturing arm by email.

The majority of Andrew’s time is spent packing kits and attending exhibitions. He told us that he enjoys trading at exhibitions and that he particularly likes the atmosphere at Scalefour North, which we were pleased to hear. According to Andrew there are four types of model railway exhibition: local, regional, specialist and national, and Andrew thinks we are currently seeing the rise of the mega-exhibition, for example the expansion of the Wigan Finescale in the last few years. There were questions as to whether some exhibitions would survive and we discussed the varied range of interests and activities people have ‘nowadays’ and that model railway exhibitions are not attended as frequently as a result.

Future developments at Wizard Models include:

• Expansion of range of ready-to-run signals
• Introductions of more components to produce different styles of British colour-light signals
• More pre-grouping wagons
• Introduction of Rupert Brown range of GN, GC and LNER coaches into Wizard’s list
• Introduction of a servo control board, similar to the Embedded Controls product

Many thanks to Andrew for a very informative talk.

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Re: WYAG News 2012

Postby James Moorhouse » Fri Apr 20, 2012 9:21 am

On Tuesday 17th April WYAG members visited Steve Hall's Drighlington for Adwalton layout. For many of us it was the first time we had been in Steve's new railway room located in the grounds of his home. The meeting was well attended, and proved a good opportunity for many members to give their stock a run in.

Banking operations on Drighlington
As the evening progressed Steve delighted in showing us the benefits of DCC by demonstrating a banking operation.

Drigh-01.JPG
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J52 68834 heads a short, but fully laden (you may need to imagine some of the loads), coal train up the 1 in 99 gradient from Ardsley.

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Assisting in the rear, J50 68935.

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Having banked the train onto the relative ease of the 1 in 316 gradient beyond Adwalton Junction, the assisting loco drops off.

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With the J50 coming to a stand on the down main just beyond the signalbox (again a bit of imagination is called for), we watch the coal train continue its journey towards Birkenshaw.

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The tank engine now sets back over the crossing to make its way light engine back to base at Ardsley: there are more trains to be banked.

If you are interested in attending any WYAG meetings in the future, come and introduce yourself to us at Scalefour North. If you don't know who to look for, Danny Cockling on the Society stand will point you in the right direction.
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Re: WYAG News 2012

Postby James Moorhouse » Fri Sep 07, 2012 3:52 pm

For some bizarre reason I haven't had a great deal of spare time of late, and consequently I've rather neglected the West Yorkshire Area Group reports. Here's what we've been up to since my last post in April.

John Quick's Brackley
In May members of the group visited John Quick to see his model railway, Brackley. John's layout is a permanent installation at his home and is a relatively accurate portrayal of Brackley on the Great Central Main Line in the Edwardian era - the obvious compromises are the small radius curves at both ends of the layout, but then the room is only 15' x 9'. Ken Kirk reported the Nottingham Area Group's visit to Brackley in June and included some superb photos by Steve Taylor here.

Brackley-May.JPG
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Here's a shot I took in May showing John's GC Class 8 Fish Engine negotiate Brackley's 3ft radius curves. The loco was built from a Jamieson "hand-cut" kit.

Low Moor Footplate Man, reminiscences by Granville Dobson
Our June meeting was a talk given by Granville Dobson about his time at Low Moor Engine Shed. He told us a little about the history of the shed, linking it to the development and expansion of Bradford as an industrial centre and explaining how it became the L&Y's second most important shed. The shed lost its importance when the railways grouped, but became more cosmopolitan in the range engines it was allocated. The shed saw further change when it was transferred to the Eastern Region 14 months into nationalization; became a diesel depot in 1958; and finally closed in 1967.
Granville started at Low Moor in 1952 as a cleaner and in his talk described his informal training, the 48 hour working week and some of the dubious practices that took place at the depot. He soon became a fireman, having passed his mainline firing exam when he was 17. He went on to tell us about the various drivers he worked with, for example John Crampton who was the roughest driver at the depot and had no idea how to handle an engine, and "Mad" Dan McGrew who had no concept of speed! Granville described working on the footplate (essentially two unstable platforms) as challenging. It was difficult to stand up on a moving loco (broken bones were not unusual) and reading the gauge glasses with water moving all ways was almost impossible. There were close calls too: Engines with newly fitted brake shoes were not as effective at stopping as those with worn in brake shoes and on one occasion Granville was convinced that his train would be unable to stop to avoid collision, so he sat himself on the edge of the footplate ready to jump just in case, when he looked down the train, the guard was doing the same thing, sat on the edge of the brake van.
Granville concluded his talk by describing the rivalry that existed between LMS and LNER men. For him Black Fives were the best engines. He never knew how LNER men stuck the job, since all their engines were terrible.
Granville has written a book: Old Flames, an account of the experiences of a Yorkshire fireman at the end of the steam era, is available from Granville on 01274 675382 or dobson@tiscali.co.uk and costs £13.99.

There was no meeting in July due to most members being on holiday.

Layout Wiring Part 2, by Brian Eves
For our August meeting we listened to the second part of Brian Eves's talk on layout wiring. Brian touched on some of the areas he had covered in the first part, but very much in the context of wiring Dewsbury Central, Brian, Dave Carter and Geoff Tiffany's joint model railway project. He described the unusual arrangement of the loops, sidings, signal box and ground frame on the prototype and how these arrangements had been replicated on the layout.
Dewsbury Central was originally wired for conventional DC cab control, with sections electrically divided and power allocated via relays. It was decided eventually that DCC was the way to go - this meant there would be one power ring (although a separate bus for the controllers), no allocation of power to sections, meaning no need for relays. There are still electrical sections and these can be easily isolated (for fault finding, etc.) via Weidmüller SAKR terminals.
Brian said quite a bit about the organization of wiring, discussing the importance of wiring diagrams or lists, the need to keep hard-copies of these and retain and record all updates; how a wire (or rather one end of a wire) is uniquely numbered to relate to the tag to which it is to be connected; colour-coding, the importance of limiting the range of colours used; and installing the wires on the layout in wiring runs and tidying them up with sleeving.
We thank Brian for a most insightful talk.

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Brian's talk was most convincing.

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Meanwhile, our Group Organizer, Dave Carter, basks in his newly found fame, having been broadcast on national radio. Dave opined, on BBC Four's Any Answers programme, that the structure of the privatized railway in this country may be a tad inefficient.

Our next meeting will be at the home of the revolutionary Dave Carter on Tuesday 18th September. It is a planning meeting, but anyone is welcome. Contact Dave Carter (details on the Blue Sheet) or me via the forum if you'd like to attend.
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Re: WYAG News 2012

Postby James Moorhouse » Thu Dec 20, 2012 1:41 pm

An Update
Unfortunately I wasn't able to attend out October meeting which was a project night, but I was told it was very good. The November meeting was a tutorial on using Templot. Derek Mathers wrote a short report:

"Don’t even ask what the neighbours made of it as twelve middle-aged men emerged from their cars on an up-market housing development to the south of Pontefract. Most of them carried a small case, large enough to contain an apron. But on this occasion the cases didn’t contain aprons, modelling or otherwise. They contained laptops. The occasion was the November gathering of the West Yorkshire area group, held at the home of group member Murray Franklin.

The meeting was a Templot teaching session led by our esteemed editor, James Moorhouse, whose sole qualification in this area is that he is slightly more familiar with the program than the rest of us! The laptops enabled James to demonstrate some of the program’s features and lead those present through a number of worked examples so that most were enabled to gain some first-hand experience in the course of the evening.

Once the computers were connected to Murray’s wireless internet connection, a process which took forty minutes, (we are railway modellers, remember!) the session began in earnest. It started with an overview before going on to consider the workpad, storage box, peg and notch functions and background shapes, such as the use of OS maps as a basis for a layout plan.

To those who are familiar with Templot, this will all seem very basic stuff. But since a number of members were approaching this for the first time it provided a useful foundation for further work. James advised us that Tony Wilkins’ notes, published on the Templot site, although written for an earlier version, would repay careful reading. I have since found this to be the case.

Thank you for a really interesting evening, James. And thank you too, Jenny, (Murray’s wife) for generously providing such a wonderful supper. By the time I’d returned to my home on the Pennines it was nearly midnight!"


It should be noted that the reason we required an internet connection was because we were using Templot 2. Upon starting Templot 2 an internet connection is required to check for updates. This ensures that the latest version of the program is always used. This, in turn, means that all users have the same experience and any support given is universal. Fortunately, some of us had remembered to start Templot 2 at home and put our laptops into sleep mode for transit - Murray's internet connection wasn't then required since Templot was already running.

To save anyone looking for Tony Wilkins' notes on Templot Club, although a visit is thoroughly recommended, I have attached them to this post. Everyone's learning technique is different, and although there are tutorials, videos and illustrative step-by-step instructions available, I have noticed that these simple notes are the most effective means of acquainting most beginners with the basics of Templot.

Our December meeting was held at the Parnaby Tavern near Leeds. No examples of members' modelling, I'm afraid, although Brian Eves showed us some very interesting plans of Crigglestone that he had uncovered for Dave Carter.

Our next meeting is on Tuesday 15th January 2013 and will be a swap meet.
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Martin Wynne
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Re: WYAG News 2012

Postby Martin Wynne » Thu Dec 20, 2012 9:46 pm

For those who don't have an RTF viewer program, Tony's notes are online at:

http://templot.com/companion/index.html ... ilkins.htm

There is also a getting started guide from Allan Ferguson (with screenshots) at:

http://templot.com/companion/index.html ... rguson.htm

These guides were written with and for older versions of Templot. The current Templot2 version is easier to use in several areas and has many new features. However, until I have created new beginner tutorials for Templot2 the above notes are a good guide.

regards,

Martin.
40 years developing Templot. And counting ...


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