Preassembling the crossing

Discuss the prototype and how to model it.
Julian Roberts
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Preassembling the crossing

Postby Julian Roberts » Wed Nov 25, 2015 10:07 am

Can anyone refer me to a previous post if one exists, or come up with a good foolproof way of preassembling the crossing? - assuming that the V has already been made, which has plenty of coverage on the various Forums. All I can find when searching "Forming the Crossing" is Howard Bolton's masterly stuff about a series of much more complicated crossings, written 2011. That is what I am after, but just at this simple "entry level".

All I want to do is to make the actual crossing as per the following photo.

It seems to me that to pre-assemble this bit accurately is likely to improve the quality of the finished turnout. I have often seen this assembly on the trackside of the real thing, as a casting waiting to be installed, so obviously that's how they do it - and Howard makes the same point re his assemblies.

I am already indebted to Martin Wynne and others for lots of ideas about turnout construction. I have ideas myself how I would do the above, but what I have learned here has helped so much. Surprisingly little though on pre-forming the crossing. My thanks in advance if anyone feels moved to contribute.
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grovenor-2685
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby grovenor-2685 » Wed Nov 25, 2015 10:55 am

Depends on what track building system you are goint to use, with ply and rivet there is no real benefit from pre-assembly as it is easier to assemble when you have the stock rails in place to gauge from.
To pre-assemble you need a suitable jig to help keeping the rails aligned, these have been described a time or two, the relevant articles need a bit of searching for though.
Regards

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steamraiser
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby steamraiser » Wed Nov 25, 2015 1:17 pm

One way is to use the plan of the crossing as in your photograph stuck to a flat piece of wood.

Then I temporarily stick short lengths of 0.6mm which copper clad strip (Obtained from C&L) to the plan using Silver Prikstick.

File and bend the various components pieces of rail.

I preassemble the V using a separate jig made using an off cot of plywood and two pieces of coffee sticks, using high temperature solder.

Solder the V to the copper clad strips, then add wing rails using crossing jig to space the wing rails off the V, and a straight edge to ensure the running rails line up.

When satisfied with the sub assembly use a shower to spray with hot water, separate the subassembly from wood base.
Silver Prikstick is water soluble.

The assembled V can then be glued in position to the crossing sleepers. I use superglue gel for this.

Gordon A
Bristol

Julian Roberts
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby Julian Roberts » Wed Nov 25, 2015 1:23 pm

Thanks Keith you are one of the helpful people with such good practical ideas. This is for traditional style rivets and ply construction, for a shared project, so that aspect is non-negotiable, whatever Howard would say!... I am making a 1 in 8 crossing, but the principle I am interested in should apply to whatever angle - yes, indeed, really my question is how to make a jig. Maybe I should have said, I have got this far - photo follows - two lines at the correct angle bisecting, (drawn on graph paper), on a flat piece of kitchen top (waste!) and fixed down with adhesive plastic covering.



My thoughts are how to make something along the lines of the Protofour idea of a jig for making the crossing, photo also attached (and comes first here, not got time to sort out correct order now), though this has not been used as I subsequently borrowed a Society jig. Nice low tech stuff is what I am thinking of...I did come across somewhere on this Forum about a proper metal jig for making the crossing, I think through the EMGS, but just now am thinking that is not a purchase I want to make if indeed it is still available.
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grovenor-2685
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby grovenor-2685 » Wed Nov 25, 2015 1:59 pm

If its Ply and rivet you really don't need to pre-assemble the wing rails, just the vee itself.
See http://www.norgrove.me.uk/points.html
Regards
PS, located crossing assembly jig by Paul Kehoe, S4N Dec 2001
and more sophisticated version by Michael Godfrey, S4N May 2006.

But IMHO you can build using my guidance notes long before you have built the jig!

Julian Roberts
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby Julian Roberts » Wed Nov 25, 2015 8:07 pm

Many thanks for those links Keith. The first one looks like the kind of thing I have in mind, still have to read it properly but acknowledging your help without further delay.

Yes I've already looked all through your very helpful trackmaking site. I do think however (and I am speaking as a novitiate in this trackmaking art) that getting the knuckle/wing rails in just the right place with the correct bend - in situ - is not as easy as you and everyone else seem to find. I know your way of doing it is the standard approach. And no doubt works fine for most people. And I have done it with a satisfactory result that works fine but I would like to improve on the way I did it - really I want to find a way of making it easier to guarantee a good result. I want to separate out the issues of getting the crossing just right within itself, from gauging it with the stock rail, so that it can be installed as a self contained unit in one hit at the correct gauge to/from the stock rail. Just like installing a casting on the real railway I would suppose.

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jon price
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby jon price » Wed Nov 25, 2015 10:54 pm

I think you are overthinking this. If you have done it successfully using the approved method then you got it right. What you need to remember is that the crossing is not a "right in itself" component. Half of each rail is "right" in relation to the opposite stock rail because it is a running rail, and half is "right" in relation to the V because it is a check rail. Consequently the easiest approach to getting it right is to get it right in relation to the other components of the turnout, not to try to make it perfect before installing. The way we make things is nothing like the real world full sized method (I've never seen any giant fingers, thumbs, butanone brushes or soldering irons in use on the real railway) so the fact that you have seen pre-assembled crossings in real life doesn't mean you can necessarily imitate that approach.
Connah's Quay Workshop threads: viewforum.php?f=125

dclift
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby dclift » Thu Nov 26, 2015 6:43 am

When bending the knuckle in the wingrail it is important that the bend is exactly perpendicular to the rail otherwise it will not align properly with the crossing vee. In order to ensure this I cheat by using a fine toothed saw to make a small nick in the rail, not deep enough to cut into the web thus:

Rail nick.JPG
Nick in head and foot of rail
Rail nick.JPG (9.63 KiB) Viewed 4887 times

I ensure perpendicularity by using the crude homemade jig shown below. It consists of a perfectly rectangular scrap of mdf at one end of which is affixed a short length of aluminium moulding in the shape of an L with a small upstand on the short leg. Before fixing the aluminium, the distance between the knuckle and the toe end of the wing rail is measured from the track template and a line is drawn across the mdf at this distance from the end.

A groove is filed in the upstand exactly square to the moulding and of dimensions to make a snug fit for a length of code 75 rail lying on its side. Two suitable holes are drilled in the moulding to enable it to be screwed or nailed to the mdf which should also be drilled to accept the screws or nails of your choice. I used nails as you can see.

The rail is slid into the groove which serves to hold it down. The rail is then pushed back until it strikes the upright of the (now inverted) L and lined up exactly parallel to the long edges of the mdf. To prevent it from moving sideways, two more nails are inserted into holes drilled in the mdf a few inches from the moulding, snug either side of the rail.

Jig in plan.JPG
Jig seen at an angle from above
Jig in plan.JPG (44.27 KiB) Viewed 4887 times

Jig in elevation.JPG
Jig seen side on
Jig in elevation.JPG (29.65 KiB) Viewed 4887 times

The rail can now be nicked with a fine toothed saw, using the marked line as a guide. after withdrawal it can be bent accurately to 1:8 or whatever angle is appropriate for your turnout. Not only does the nick ensure that the bend is accurate and at the correct distance from one end of the rail (hence meaning that the rail only needs to be cut to length at the other end). it makes bending a little easier. Because the nick closes up on bending, it is barely visible on the finished rail. The finished jig can now be used over and over again.

Lacking a conveniently shaped piece of aluminium moulding, it would be possible to cobble together from plasticard or similar something suitable for the business end of the jig. Of course, if you only have one or two turnouts to build, it is probably not worth the time taken to construct the jig, but I have used mine to construct wing rails for over a dozen turnouts with several more to go and I have found it very useful, though purists might quibble at nicking the rail.
David Clift.

Julian Roberts
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby Julian Roberts » Thu Nov 26, 2015 9:04 am

Thanks everyone. Somehow Gordon's reply didn't appear in the order it now appears. I think something along the lines you suggest are the way I will go.
Jon yes maybe you are right. Yes, it works perfectly well at the slow speeds intended, but I was not altogether satisfied: somehow the straight road of the finished article was not quite straight, by the time I had finished adjusting it. It strikes me that the crossing is an X. The V we make is just half of it. The accuracy of the other V is surely just as important in making a straight sided X, however short that straightness may be on the diverging road. So, just like making the casting that is today's railway's crossing, but out of bits of rail.
I will see if I get a better result by going the jig way.

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grovenor-2685
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby grovenor-2685 » Thu Nov 26, 2015 9:32 am

It will need the same level of care in fitting to make it straight in a jig as it will in the turnout using gauges and straight edges, its essentially the same process and needs practice.
Building the complete crossing first needs something to hold it together, when the turnout is being built with functional plastic chairs then use of small brass or copperclad baseplates for this and glueing them to the timbers is fine, but with ply and rivet construction you need to be soldering to the rivets so you would need to use the timbers in the jig when assembling the crossing anyway.
I think it helps a lot when assembling short pieces of rail to have a nice continuous rail opposite that you can gauge each piece from thus ensuring they are in line, the stock rail serves this purpose but in pre-assembly the jig has to substitute for it.
But in the end, its whatever suits you best, apply care and patience and practice.
Regards

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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby Winander » Thu Nov 26, 2015 12:42 pm

dclift wrote:When bending the knuckle in the wingrail it is important that the bend is exactly perpendicular to the rail otherwise it will not align properly with the crossing vee.


Doesn't this produce a kink in the rail rather than a bend with a radius? I read in another place (not the usual one) that pre-grouping LNWR wing rails had something closer to a short bend with a radius than a sudden kink, and would be grateful if someone can confirm this. Is a kink REA practice?

thanks
Richard

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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby FCA » Thu Nov 26, 2015 12:52 pm

Keith is spot on; practice and patience are essential. Personally I always now pre-assemble crossings using the excellent EMGS jig and solders with different melting points. To me the great benefit of doing it this way is that the crossing, once made, can be inspected from all angles to ensure that the rails are truly in line and perpendicular.If they're not throw it away and start again.
Richard

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Will L
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby Will L » Thu Nov 26, 2015 5:33 pm

Julian Roberts wrote:..It strikes me that the crossing is an X. The V we make is just half of it. The accuracy of the other V is surely just as important in making a straight sided X, however short that straightness may be on the diverging road. So, just like making the casting that is today's railway's crossing, but out of bits of rail.


Years ago I went through a variation of this line of thought, and by dint of a lot of filling actually produce a crossing where the running rails were, original, continuous through the crossing, the wing rails were grafted on after the event and the flange ways cut out last. Nothing like any real point and I decide a whole lot more difficult than doing the job the more traditional way. Experience proved that getting the alignment right through the common crossing is really a matter of gauging the thing carefully as you build it, although this is complicated by the short length of the closure rail making it difficult to align properly. You may well find it easier if you make the switch rail, closure rail and wing rails as a single unit, fit and gauge it against the stock rail and cut the joint between the switch blades and the closure rail when all else has gone together.

Winander wrote: I read in another place (not the usual one) that pre-grouping LNWR wing rails had something closer to a short bend with a radius than a sudden kink, and would be grateful if someone can confirm this. Is a kink REA practice?


I'm sure they were so specified, but I think this is more about the radius on the inside of the bend than the outside. There will inevitably be a radius on the outside, as bending anything with any thickness will produce one. Bending the rail round a sharp edge would put a lot more stress into the rail than doing it round a radiused former, thus specifying the radius of the bend was more in the way of acknowledging the reality of the way the bend would be formed than anything else. I'm not sure us modellers has the same issues with the potential of the rail breaking at the bend, so, while nicking the read and foot of the rail to ensure the bend is in the right plain will produce a slightly tighter radius I doubt the effect is material from a performance point of view, and being sure of getting the bend in the right plain would be of value. How visible it would be I'm not sure but I know the purists won't be happy unless right radius is there.

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grovenor-2685
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby grovenor-2685 » Thu Nov 26, 2015 7:41 pm

You may well find it easier if you make the switch rail, closure rail and wing rails as a single unit,
This is something I always try to avoid! My experience is that it is always easier to have only one critical end on a piece of rail#, making it a little overlength and then cutting the plain end to fit. So the switch has a critical end at the point where you file it, the wing rail has the critical point at the bend, once the bend is made and the angle checked, mark out the position of the second bend for the flare, make the second bend then cut off to length at the flare end. Then you can mark the position to cut for the wing rail/switch rail joint and cut that. (Most prototypes have two joints with a closure rail between, you can choose either position as convenient). Finally cut the switch to final length when the wing rail is in place.
#Occasionally you have to break this rail in complex formations such as a scissors where the rail is just to short to fit a joint in, these need extra care.
Regards
PS. I don't see the benefit in nicking the wing rail for the bend, just mark the position on the railhead with a pencil, hold in pliers, make sure the rail is at right angles to the plier and bend with fingers.

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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby Julian Roberts » Fri Nov 27, 2015 12:02 am

Thanks for the discussion. I am getting somewhere making a jig and will post when I have something positive to show.
Regarding nicking the rail, and the bend at the knuckle, I don't know whether I am right to look on Martin Wynne as the ultimate guru for this novitiate, but he says that there is a radius at the bend equating in feet to the angle of the turnout, and therefore there is no need to nick the rail. See http://85a.co.uk/forum/view_post.php?post_id=9038
I can say that that aspect of the turnout I have already made I was satisfied with.
Will, you are not the first person to say to me this week that the switch, closure, knuckle and wing rail can all be made as one. But to me this seems the height of virtuosity. I have previously been learning about making undercut switches through the forum, that is a subject in itself. I think to make the switch integral with the closure rail is possible at my stage, but agree with Keith there are quite enough issues with that - and keep the issues discussed here re the crossing on a nicely separate piece of rail.

Maybe I should ask in a separate topic, but is the S4 Society template for a B8 LH point accurate or is there something not quite right about (one of?) the timbers near the crossing nose? I know that there is an issue about the actual size as printed without making some adjustment, and I don't mean that.

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grovenor-2685
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby grovenor-2685 » Fri Nov 27, 2015 12:35 am

Maybe I should ask in a separate topic, but is the S4 Society template for a B8 LH point accurate or is there something not quite right about (one of?) the timbers near the crossing nose? I know that there is an issue about the actual size as printed without making some adjustment, and I don't mean that.

As I understand it the closure/wingrail joint is one timber interval out from the more usual place and consequently the reduced spacing between the joint timbers is similarly one position out. There is some confusion in my mind from a hazy memory of the explanations when this was first discussed as to whether it was a variation used on the LNER or was a change made to suit P4 track company kit production.
Regards

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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby billbedford » Fri Nov 27, 2015 9:13 am

Winander wrote:Doesn't this produce a kink in the rail rather than a bend with a radius? I read in another place (not the usual one) that pre-grouping LNWR wing rails had something closer to a short bend with a radius than a sudden kink, and would be grateful if someone can confirm this. Is a kink REA practice?


That is correct for LNWR track. There are drawings with the relevant radii marked here. I have another drawing if you want the 1:11 to 1:20 crossing angles.
Bill Bedford
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grovenor-2685
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby grovenor-2685 » Fri Nov 27, 2015 10:09 am

billbedford wrote:
Winander wrote:Doesn't this produce a kink in the rail rather than a bend with a radius? I read in another place (not the usual one) that pre-grouping LNWR wing rails had something closer to a short bend with a radius than a sudden kink, and would be grateful if someone can confirm this. Is a kink REA practice?


That is correct for LNWR track. There are drawings with the relevant radii marked here. I have another drawing if you want the 1:11 to 1:20 crossing angles.


It is correct for all fabricated crossings (as distinct from cast crossings). I expect there were variations but the tables in "British Railway Track" show the knuckle radius in feet as the same as the crossing number. ie 4ft radius for 1:4, 8ft radius for 1:8 etc. Kinks would create a high stress point in the rail leading to breakage.
Regards

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Will L
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby Will L » Fri Nov 27, 2015 11:06 am

Julian Roberts wrote:Will, you are not the first person to say to me this week that the switch, closure, knuckle and wing rail can all be made as one. But to me this seems the height of virtuosity. I have previously been learning about making undercut switches through the forum, that is a subject in itself. I think to make the switch integral with the closure rail is possible at my stage, but agree with Keith there are quite enough issues with that - and keep the issues discussed here re the crossing on a nicely separate piece of rail.


I think the way you go on this depends on what is driving you as a modeller. Getting the crossing right, assembled from the individual components, is perfectly do-able but does require a level of skill, or perhaps the persistence to keep at it till its right more than skill (which comes with practice), but if your a "getting it all right" sort of modeller there is little choice. On mature reflection it does sound like you could be going that way. Doing it as a single unit is more in the bodger's tradition unlikely to be compatible with an undercut switch.

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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby steamraiser » Fri Nov 27, 2015 12:49 pm

If you can I found it useful to examine the construction of a full sized V and the rest of the crossing and the blades my local heritage railway, taking a number of pictures for reference.
You will probably need to arrange to do this in advance for safety reasons.

Gordon A
Bristol

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grovenor-2685
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby grovenor-2685 » Fri Nov 27, 2015 9:26 pm

Full dimensions for GWR/BR(W) crossings including knuckle radii are available
here http://www.norgrove.me.uk/GWRtracknotes/R2998.pdf
and here http://www.norgrove.me.uk/GWRtracknotes/R2999.pdf
Regards

PS. Remember these dimensions are for exact scale, to allow for the slightly wider P4 flangeway you have to reduce dimension 'L' slightly and increase 'M' by the same amount.
(TEMPLOT does this for you!)

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grovenor-2685
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby grovenor-2685 » Fri Nov 27, 2015 11:13 pm

grovenor-2685 wrote:
Maybe I should ask in a separate topic, but is the S4 Society template for a B8 LH point accurate or is there something not quite right about (one of?) the timbers near the crossing nose? I know that there is an issue about the actual size as printed without making some adjustment, and I don't mean that.

As I understand it the closure/wingrail joint is one timber interval out from the more usual place and consequently the reduced spacing between the joint timbers is similarly one position out. There is some confusion in my mind from a hazy memory of the explanations when this was first discussed as to whether it was a variation used on the LNER or was a change made to suit P4 track company kit production.
Regards

Whatever my memory of this story it seems to be apocryphal, I have checked all my data and templates for B8 turnouts.
a). Original P4 template from Studiolith
b). Scalefour Society original issue.
c). Current Scalefour Society/Exactoscale by Len Newman
d). Templot with generic V and CLM.
All 4 have the switch and stockrail joints in the same places, all 4 have the closure to wing joints in the same places, all 4 have the same timbering
All 4 have the lead length quoted by the PWI table for the LMS/LNE/SR of 65' 1.5" (260.5mm) [NB. GWR had a longer lead of 66'6" Templot could be tweaked for that one].
All 4 have wing rails as near as I can measure to the GWR 1:8 linked in my post above.
Any of these 4 Templates will produce the same result if used for construction.
Regards

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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby Julian Roberts » Sat Nov 28, 2015 12:03 am

Thanks for everyone's replies.
Today I slaved over a hot soldering iron and made the journey between these pictures. Will say a bit more tomorrow. Main thing was triangulating the knuckle/wing. Obviously one wing rail still needs chopping and other things sorted out - all those pcb bits are not fixed down. Remains to be tested.
Luckily I have quite a bit of spare rail and pcb from an abandoned layout project (fortunately! - it was in my 00 days.)
This did not save time!!!
20151127_121105.jpg
The "jig". Relying on pencil lines for accurate placing of the plastic alignment bits at the left hand end was inadequate, it turned out. I did not need four "crossing timbers" to be pre-stuck down (the actual timbers should fit between these pcb ones.)
Attachments
20151127_223308.jpg
In the cold light of day the next morning I see the knuckles are not quite opposite each other.
20151127_221708.jpg
How the preassembled crossing looks. Only the four original timbers are stuck down. The others had to fit around them so this was what took a lot of the time.
20151127_222032.jpg
Looks OK for a straight run?
20151127_184545.jpg
Triangulated knuckle/wing rail - the straight part has been aligned with a ruler
20151127_134638.jpg
First attempt. Triangulation was better
Last edited by Julian Roberts on Sat Nov 28, 2015 1:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby Julian Roberts » Sat Nov 28, 2015 1:15 pm

Will, I have been on this modelling kick for about 20 years now, started in P4 about 2007, but in P4 I have only made rolling stock for our club layout. See viewtopic.php?f=19&t=3511 . My interest in making a turnout is from the obligation to contribute one to the club for a proposed extension, but informed by the experience of making a crossover on a curve in 00, and an ordinary turnout over a board break, in 00 days.

Thank you David for the discussion that you started regarding the bend in the knuckle, and the radius. It strikes me, and Keith I think corroborates this, that worrying about this aspect is not really necessary - and believe me if there's anything to worry about I'm right in there 100%! Martin Wynne suggests a method of bending the rail too using a hammer and a screwdriver, but I can't see the problem with doing it in the pliers so long as the bend is perpendicular. Also, surely, the radius that is called for will pretty much occur just by bending it? - model rail being proportionally much stiffer than the prototype apparently.

Thanks Keith for coming up with the answer about the template, so obviously it's plain sailing there.

Somehow I overlooked Richard's (FCA) reply. Do you mean a jig that makes the whole crossing, just as I am asking? - and not just a jig for making the V? As I have spent many hours just making this crossing if I have any sense of mortality and priorities I ought to buy one! Though I have had quite a lot of fun...

I have the feeling that some critical things in railway modelling are made to sound easier than they actually are, either because people are so good and experienced at what they do, or else accepting of things not being quite right. For example, quartering the wheels of a steam loco - I struggled with that for so long until I firstly made a jig (for a wacky flycrank loco in 009 scale), and then bought one for normal locomotives.

I feel the same applies with this business of crossings (and switchblades come to that). Much emphasis is made on making the V, but getting the knuckle bend correct and in exactly the right place with the right gap between the two of them and so that the running lines are straight is surely no less critical. The way this is glossed over in the average instructions is as though you could do it all while making an omelette with your other hand. Keith does not, and emphasizes care and practice.

Anyway, I had lots of time recently working away. Thinking about modelling in my spare time, it occurred to me that the crossing is an X: we have the jigs for making the V: I thought maybe it would be easy to preassemble the rest of the X. What I have found here is that that is not so - but maybe it could be with some other brains.

I do have the jig for making the V, so first I made that. I stuck it down on the "jig" (the piece of graph paper with 1:8 intersecting lines covered in adhesive plastic film sticking it down to the waste worktop.)

Essentially what I did yesterday was to prefabricate the two bits that come between the two V's, using the V jig to get the correct angles on the knuckle bend. So then the issue is 'just' lining them up.

When I woke this morning I thought, could I have prefabricated the other V? The V jig could be used after the knuckle bends have been made to solder a V shape - but the question would be, what is the gap between the two knuckles? It could be quite a lot easier...?

The angle of the knuckle has got to be exactly the 'inverse' (is that the right word?) of that of the crossing... So it is easy the use the jig in a different way for that.
20151127_115655.jpg
The knuckle rail is bent parallel to the other in the V jig to get the correct angle


Hopefully the rest of what I posted last night is self-explanatory. This morning I looked at the picture of the crossing and could see the knuckles weren't opposite each other - more obvious here than to the naked eye. A re-think made me realise that there was an inaccuracy elsewhere, so one of the triangulated sections came out, the problem addressed, and section replaced. Temporary stock rails were knocked up, and the crossing tested with sweet as honey results.
20151128_103306.jpg
Testing with my most troublesome wagon

20151128_103423.jpg
Hopefully marginally improved knuckle placing


So I have made my crossing, it just remains to dismember it down to its essentials and then install for real. Hopefully I will be able to get rid of the bits of copperclad that remain after it is properly attached to the timbers.

Obviously the time spent is way out of proportion, but it would probably be possible to do it all a lot quicker another time from what I learned here.
Last edited by Julian Roberts on Sat Nov 28, 2015 1:59 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Martin Wynne
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Re: Preassembling the crossing

Postby Martin Wynne » Sat Nov 28, 2015 1:20 pm

grovenor-2685 wrote:Whatever my memory of this story it seems to be apocryphal, I have checked all my data and templates for B8 turnouts.

Hi Keith,

Not apocryphal, here is a scan of the original Exactoscale/P4 Track Co/S4 Soc B-8 template, matching the moulded base in the Exactoscale turnout kits:

exactoscale_b8_error.jpg
exactoscale_b8_error.jpg (182.14 KiB) Viewed 4426 times

The explanation at the time from Exactoscale was that it was done intentionally as a production requirement. I made the suggestion that they could claim it as a hangover from earlier GER pre-group practice (not LNER), although I know of no evidence of such a prototype.

The latest templates from C&L (and Society downloads) appear to have been modified since then. I don't know if the moulded base and assembled crossings in the kits have been similarly modified.

regards,

Martin.
40 years developing Templot. And counting ...


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