Edwardian Figures

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David B
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Edwardian Figures

Postby David B » Thu Aug 08, 2013 7:39 pm

I have just come across the website of Andrew Stadden who makes figures, many in 7mm. However, he is thinking of doing some Edwardian figures in 4mm and I have attached a couple of photos of test pieces. I think they are extremely good and would make a welcome addition to the relatively small range of such figures available in 4mm when compared with those available to the 7mm modeller.

At the moment, Andrew is gauging interest and would appreciate an email form anyone interested and / or with suggestions and comments. One suggestion I have made to him concerns separate arms as are available in some of his 7mm figures. These are early days; Andrew would need a range of 18 figures to make one mould and Edwardian railway staff are a further possibility. They would be sold in smaller sets.

I don't actually know Andrew but am posting this because I would like a range of Edwardian figures myself. If, like me, you are interested and like what you see from these early test pieces and the rest of his site (do look at his 7mm pieces), please send an email to Andrew Stadden at enquiries@acstadden.co.uk. It will only be through your interest that a welcome addition might be made to the 4mm range of quality figures.

OO Ed Lady 01 600 01.JPG
OO Ed Lady 01 600 01.JPG (116.65 KiB) Viewed 10297 times

OO Ed Couple 04 600 01.JPG
OO Ed Couple 04 600 01.JPG (105.3 KiB) Viewed 10297 times

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Guy Rixon
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby Guy Rixon » Thu Aug 08, 2013 8:39 pm

Looks promising. I've emailed an expression of interest to Mr. Stadden.

jayell

Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby jayell » Thu Aug 08, 2013 9:12 pm

guyrixon wrote:Looks promising. I've emailed an expression of interest to Mr. Stadden.


I have done the same

John

allanferguson
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby allanferguson » Thu Aug 08, 2013 9:32 pm

I'm delighted to see a new manufacturer of pre WW1 figures. But I think Langley Models have quite a wide range of Victorian figures and impedimenta. I couldn't comment on the relative quality, though.

Allan F

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Jol Wilkinson
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby Jol Wilkinson » Fri Aug 09, 2013 6:52 am

There is a recent thread on this topic on RMWeb, discussing the quality of model figures:

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index. ... e-figures/

The consensus is that the standard is pretty poor, especially for 4mm, with photos of various products.

I too have contacted Andrew to express an interest in his 4mm figures. More variety of Edwardian/Victorian figures is very welcome.

Jol

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Guy Rixon
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby Guy Rixon » Sat Aug 10, 2013 1:52 pm

We should, of course, be careful not to confuse Edwardian figurines with Victorian ones. In fact, to get really picky, we should distinguish early from late Edwardian. Styles changed quite rapidly in the first years of the 20th century.

For example, googling for "Edwardian fashion" in the image search leads to this page: http://blog.tuppencehapenny.co.uk/2011/11/vintage-for-beginners-20th-century.html. The style of the female figure in Andy Stadden's sample is a close match for the 1907 example on that page but very different from the 1909 example.

Also, when did the fashion for men's straw boaters start? My vague memory is that it came in with the naval review at the end of Victoria's reign, 1900 IIRC.

Of course, less well-off people were probably wearing second-hand clothes from previous years, so the applicability of the figures has sharp-ish start-dates and a end-dates. We should be careful how we deploy these assets.

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Flymo748
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby Flymo748 » Sun Aug 11, 2013 6:57 am

davidb wrote:At the moment, Andrew is gauging interest and would appreciate an email form anyone interested and / or with suggestions and comments.


Just emailed :-)

Cheers
Flymo
Beware of Trains - occasional modelling in progress!
www.5522models.co.uk

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David B
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby David B » Sun Aug 11, 2013 7:38 pm

I would point out, in response to Guy's useful comments, that the models photographed above, are 'tasters' to show what the quality is like. There won't be any figures at all if the interest is not there, but if there is, then the range will be developed.

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David B
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby David B » Tue Sep 24, 2013 6:52 pm

Andrew Stadden sent me castings first three pieces and they are illustrated below.

They will be at Scaleforum for people to see. I have arranged for them to be on the Missenden stand and the Society stand. There has been a pleasing number of emails sent to Andrew since I first posted about these figures. Please do continue to let Andrew know if you are interested and come to the stands I mention above to see them in the flesh. They really are lovely pieces and a welcome addition to the somewhat limited range of figures available at the moment.

You can email Andrew at enquiries@acstadden.co.uk

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jayell

Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby jayell » Tue Sep 24, 2013 9:09 pm

I'll have to try to find out where in the Edwardian era that female outfit comes from, Edward VII died in 1910 so providing the dress in not early Edwardian it will fit my time period nicely.

John

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David B
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby David B » Tue Sep 24, 2013 9:25 pm

I would have thought you might find something very similar in the late Victorian era and I am sure you would find some dowager wearing such an outfit years after it had gone out of fashion, John, especially in a rural area. It was called 'thrift'. I would happily use it for any time up to the Great War, for then fashions did change - out of necessity!

My father reminds me that trouser turn ups were frowned on during WW2 as they were considered an unnecessary of material.

jayell

Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby jayell » Wed Sep 25, 2013 7:45 am

This item on e-bay looks very similar to the lady figure and give a good idea what colour the dress could become when painted.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/ANTIQUE-VINTAGE ... 3cd61831c3

John

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David B
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby David B » Fri Oct 04, 2013 12:11 pm

I have heard from Andrew this week. He has been working on more of the range but I should stress that these are 'work in progress', so the attitudes and arms are not in final positions.

This is what he writes:

"As things stand I am aiming to have 10 upper class civilian figures and 10 middle/working class figures each for sale as a set of 10 figures.
Further emails have been coming in, and it is all looking very encouraging.

I have had a few days free recently, (and I also enjoyed making them) so as you can see in the attached photo I now have a set of 10 upper class civilian figures. These are still work in progress, and as you can see I have done nothing with the arms yet.

My thinking now is that I will have the arms fixed on passenger/civilian figures, in the usual sort of poses, and that I will only do separate arms on selected railway staff figures (assuming the passenger sets are successful). They will be very small and fiddly (to pack as well as assemble). I may well produce a pack of body parts later on to assist anyone with conversions."


So, please keep the emails coming to express your interest: enquiries@acstadden.co.uk

OO Figures 400 02.JPG

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jon price
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby jon price » Sat Oct 26, 2013 9:36 pm

Andrew Stadden has released the images of his first set of Edwardian figures. They are I think, exceptional.
OO Figures 600 04.JPG
Connah's Quay Workshop threads: viewforum.php?f=125

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David B
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby David B » Mon Nov 11, 2013 8:34 pm

The latest on the Edwardian figures from Andrew Stadden:

Attached is an image of the completed pewter masters for the two sets of 10 figures. They should be off to the mould maker by the end of the week, so it won't be too long before they are in production.

I do now have costings in mind, although I will not be able to confirm this until I have had a production trial run. The price of OO metal figures varies wildly between manufacturers, I anticipate these being firmly in the middle ground.


I think they look absolutely marvellous and look forward to seeing them for real. If the test castings that were shown as Scaleforum are anything to go by, they will be top notch.

If you are interested or have any comments, please send Andrew an email: enquiries@acstadden.co.uk

David.

OO Figures 600 06.JPG

Brinkly
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby Brinkly » Thu Nov 14, 2013 6:12 pm

Gosh I might just buy a set simply to paint, they are wonderful.

I wonder if he will expand into other eras?

Regards,

Nick.

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Mark Tatlow
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby Mark Tatlow » Thu Nov 14, 2013 11:02 pm

Those are rather nice David.

Would you mind making a suggestion that a fair number should be sitting down. As most of us model stations, I think it is fair to say that a good number of our punters would be sitting and certainly they would be within carriages (you want to believe how many people are required to go in a 54 ft carriage for example)
Mark Tatlow

nigelcliffe
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby nigelcliffe » Thu Nov 14, 2013 11:09 pm

Mark Tatlow wrote: (you want to believe how many people are required to go in a 54 ft carriage for example)


Ah, pick a different prototype, such as the Mid Suffolk, and the answer would be not many, unless market day !


The figures are very nice, and I am also tempted just by the quality. I have no use for them unless I create a film set for a period costume drama....

- Nigel

Natalie Graham

Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby Natalie Graham » Fri Nov 15, 2013 2:27 pm

Mark Tatlow wrote:
Would you mind making a suggestion that a fair number should be sitting down.


I had never thought about it before and haven't checked any old photos since the thought occurred so may be wrong, but my impression is that there are very few people seated, on photos of stations on Edwardian photos. Maybe it was the novelty of being photographed that made them stand or the discomfort of female dress of the time meant they would rather stand and the men followed suit. Perhaps services were more frequent and it wasn't worth bothering sitting down or the photographers waited until a train was due before they took the pictures. Maybe it is a reflection on the fact that Edwardians lived in less sedentary times or that I have a mistaken impression but there always seems to be people standing around and few sitting down. I suppose some must have done as the railways provided platform seats.

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Paul Townsend
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby Paul Townsend » Fri Nov 15, 2013 4:58 pm

Mark Tatlow wrote:Those are rather nice David.

Would you mind making a suggestion that a fair number should be sitting down. As most of us model stations, I think it is fair to say that a good number of our punters would be sitting and certainly they would be within carriages (you want to believe how many people are required to go in a 54 ft carriage for example)


We definitely would like some sitters for platforms etc but I suggest these lovely and potentially pricey figures would be wasted in carriages. Windows were small, lights dim so visibility is low. Any old butchered cheap placcy figures will do as you can't see the fashions except perhaps giant ladies hats; easily added as only crude representation is required inside carriages.

Mark, you are forbidden to count passengers next Tuesday, else thats a third pint :!:

PS.
The key is probably for us to buy lots of the first 20, then Andrew will see success and be more likely to make more :thumb

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Paul Townsend
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby Paul Townsend » Fri Nov 15, 2013 5:04 pm

Natalie Graham wrote:
Mark Tatlow wrote:
Would you mind making a suggestion that a fair number should be sitting down.


I had never thought about it before and haven't checked any old photos since the thought occurred so may be wrong, but my impression is that there are very few people seated, on photos of stations on Edwardian photos. Maybe it was the novelty of being photographed that made them stand or the discomfort of female dress of the time meant they would rather stand and the men followed suit. Perhaps services were more frequent and it wasn't worth bothering sitting down or the photographers waited until a train was due before they took the pictures. Maybe it is a reflection on the fact that Edwardians lived in less sedentary times or that I have a mistaken impression but there always seems to be people standing around and few sitting down. I suppose some must have done as the railways provided platform seats.


I suggest corsets made sitting tiresome!
Besides when trains reliably ran to time you didn't have long to wait!

johnWM
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby johnWM » Sat Nov 16, 2013 5:33 pm

paultownsend wrote:PS.
The key is probably for us to buy lots of the first 20, then Andrew will see success and be more likely to make more

Absolutely. Please buy them, I would like him to make more. These are amazingly good figures, just look at the lady on the left of the bottom set and the bloke on the right of the top set. The faces are not only well modeled, they actually contain clear expression, even unpainted you can see that lady has attitude, superb, and its not overdone. I like the variety of costume as well. There is a lady in the lower set that reminds me of pictures of female market traders of the era I saw somewhere.

In the Edwardian era, many people seemed to view travel as a special occasion so dressed quite smartly by our standards, often looking as if they are in their Sunday best, most of the figures in the top set and most of the women in the lower set seem to fit this description. Many working class people from this era had very few clothes, so actually had no choice, it was either work clothes or Sunday best, because that was the only choice they had. If we could persuade more figures to be made I would like a set of Edwardian figures in rougher working clothes. They could be quite generic and fit a lot of circumstances, from farm scenes, to light industry, to house back yards, making deliveries to shops, working in the coal yard, on the way to the pit or factory etc etc. The difficulty is that such very common scenes were rarely photographed, but it would be great to have some figures that were clearly working class to suit rural or industrial settings from this era. Such scenes being much less affected by fashion would give a set of figures with an appeal to modellers from the Victorian era to the 1930's. A farm worker in loose fitting trousers, collarless baggy shirt and braces for example I think would have a wide appeal. Some children, some less fancy headgear, ie flat caps, a few men with no hats, ladies in loose cotton bonnets, I think this is a real gap in what is currently available, so would complement Andrew's first two sets well.

paultownsend wrote:I suggest corsets made sitting tiresome!

That's why most armchair modellers don't wear corsets; similar reason I suppose. ;)

:idea: Although, they did need to sit to get to the station by pony and trap, so maybe we do need some seated figures as well.

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Will L
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby Will L » Sat Nov 16, 2013 10:17 pm

johnWM wrote: ...a few men with no hat...


I don't think so, have you looked a a photograph of an Edwardian scene and found any men without a hat?

Will

johnWM
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby johnWM » Sun Nov 17, 2013 4:51 pm

Re Request some working figures in either working, industrial, rural or back yard settings - A few (small number) with no Hats
Will L wrote:I don't think so


I absolutely agree with the general principle that Andrew's figures do have and should have hats. The ones produced so far are spot on.
Evidence here -
http://www.peterberthoud.co.uk/2012/10/edwardian-london-in-photos/
100's of photos like these show that Edwardian's out and about, had hats!!! Will, I know!
Even in less public places, if a photographer turned up, children were cuffed round the ear and told to "put your cap on", no doubt

However, I disagree with Will that they wore them everywhere, and all the time and there are plenty of informal photos taken by family members to prove the point.
Top photo here
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2260309/An-Edwardian-holiday-Photos-taken-disabled-son-wealthy-family-reveals-English-seaside-adventures-1900s.html
and several photos further down

and here, 5th photo down
http://ageofuncertainty.blogspot.co.uk/2011/04/edwardians.html

and the mum in this picture
http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/sussex/hi/p ... 377224.stm

and more rural
https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=edwar ... B500%3B313

and
http://www.lib.uwo.ca/archives/virtuale ... intro.html

and all the children in this picture
http://store.the-gatherings-antique-vin ... otographs/

My point is that if nearly all the figures have hats on its good, but if all do and some are more informal, its going to look a little odd, in the same way that if all figures are in action poses it looks odd, or all are clearly posing for a camera it looks odd.

Finally how about the photo of the Boddington family at Manningford Abbots mill
http://www.freewebs.com/susanboddington/
6 figures with hats, and one without, they are working in muddy and wet conditions, I wonder how many took their hats off to work when the photographer had gone. One had put his hat down and couldn't find it for the photographers benefit.
Will, I'll leave that thought with you.

Andrew, the figures are fab, can we have some more. Thank you to davidb for bringing them to our attention.

new edit - I have just looked at the 1/43 figures on Andrew's site, the Victorian/Edwardian family group are superb, and guess what, dad doesn't have a hat!!
John

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Will L
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Re: Edwardian Figures

Postby Will L » Sun Nov 17, 2013 8:39 pm

johnWM wrote:Re Request some working figures in either working, industrial, rural or back yard settings - A few (small number) with no Hats
Will L wrote:I don't think so


I absolutely agree with the general principle that Andrew's figures do have and should have hats. The ones produced so far are spot on.
Evidence here -
http://www.peterberthoud.co.uk/2012/10/edwardian-london-in-photos/
100's of photos like these show that Edwardian's out and about, had hats!!! Will, I know!
Even in less public places, if a photographer turned up, children were cuffed round the ear and told to "put your cap on", no doubt

However, I disagree with Will that they wore them everywhere, and all the time and there are plenty of informal photos taken by family members to prove the point.


Actually I didn't mean to suggest the Edwardians always wore a hat, but none the less your evidence to the contrary are mostly taken indoors, although I gather my grandfather would wear his indoors, or as part of a posed portraits. The one exception was the ladies working in a field, who may or may not have been wearing lace caps but were all mental patients being employed on field work so not necessarily typical of the general population.

Really I was just pointing out that, in sharp contrast to our experience and expectation today, if you are modelling people in the street, at the station or on the train, we ought to be aware that the hat less head would have been as rare as the proverbial hens teeth. It's getting details like that right is what gives impact and authenticity to a model. I'd have thought modelling the odd, very occasional, exception which proves the rule, a little surgery is all that is necessary, and the amputated hat should probably be best reattached to the models hand in mid doff. :D

Will
Last edited by Will L on Mon Nov 18, 2013 12:02 am, edited 2 times in total.


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