Mk2 Lever frame musings

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junctionmad
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Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby junctionmad » Sun Aug 19, 2018 7:24 pm

Having completed the first stage which is 15 levers of 50 ( the points levers, these will be rearranged in the 50 frame ) , I feel I can comment on the process and the etch


Firstly its a very enjoyable process , building as it does into very robust and surprising heavy unit


First forming the quadrant . I tried the " rolling method " , but I found that problematic , I finally settled on a method of tack soldering the quadrant plate , onto its former and by pressing down as I proceeded around it formed the necessary curve. However Im not entirely satisfied, personally I think proper rolling bars are the only solution ( I hope to pick up a set at telford )

I didnt follow the instructions in relation to the rubbing strip , I merely tack soldered at one extreme , pressed them home and tack soldered them , worked well


I used 0.5 wire for the catch handle pivot , as this was more readily available and drilled the clearance to 0.6. Where The catch box was located onto the lever , I merely used my 0.5mm drill as a dowel, soldered it up and withdrew the drill, which was held in a pin vice

As can be seen , the 2.5mm rod was tapped and secured with m2.5 nuts , the centres of the design just allow the nut to be on the end

Since Ive converted al my BA stuff into bitcoins !, I used m2.5 steel /nickel plated nuts and bolts in replacement , these are a dime a dozen , with Carrs yellow flux they solder very well onto the nickel

IN a similar vein , instead of 8BA threaded rod, I used m2.5 ( 2.5 rod is available from Albion, as is 0.5mm wire and 1.2mm tube ) I used the same M2.5 rod tapped and fitted with nuts

Now the comments


(a) Of all the folds that can go wrong the catch box is irretrievable when it does , whereas the catch handle can be rescued . Please on a revision of the etch , add one or two spare catch boxes, its not like there isnt space ( I have more 8Ba etched washers then I can throw a stick at ) , add a spare catch handle , an extra rubbing strip as well. Having to fork out ( as I did ) for a complete 5 lever etch to ensure I had a backup isnt pleasant !!


(b) Consider adding a little more clearance between the catch box, and the rubbing strip, The catch box is cosmetic and adding a little more clearance, means that errors in the rolling of the quadrant dont end up fouling the catch box, I found I had to file the rubbing strips quite extensively to ensure free movement , 0.5mm extra clearance would go along way here


(c) Would it kill the economics to include a spare spring , see the point in (a)

(d) The typical hole in a " standard microswitch " , mine where Omron from Farnell is about 2.4mm , eased out to a clearance for m2,5 bar means the 8BA threaded rod can be kept in your bank vault gaining value

(e) I may be wrong , but it looks to me that the hole centres of the microswitch support rods are a tiny bit off, my switches ( as are most ) are specified with centre of 9,5mm +-0.1mm but the fret looks slightly less, This may be less apparent with 8BA rod , but with M2.5 you have to elongate the holes

(f) The resting position of the catch handle is largely determined by the position of the catch rod pivot , small position differences in the pivot , can cause the catch handle to " rest " in quite noticeable different resting positions, It would be useful to have a defined | stop " or land for the catch handle , so when released it returns to a consistent position not determined by the exact pivot construction

(g) with the standard microswitches I have , I most definitely have to bend the roller arm to bring the roller both closer to lever and its pivot point, I cant say thats needed on all of them , but it is on this . Had I a preference, I would have integrated a microswitch into the frame itself , rather then a seperate etch , as this constrains the mounting requirement to placing the whole frame on a " sub=floor "

(h) Im sure theres a good reason , but why was the orientation of of the frame done the way it was ,surely it should fit into a " signal box floor" , whereas this frame has the rear considerably higher then the front , I have to put cosmetic pieces around the back and side to hide the rear from view


Having said all that , its a great product , well done


Dave

IMG_0066.JPG

JFS
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby JFS » Mon Aug 20, 2018 9:49 pm

Hello Dave,

Many thanks for your your kind feedback, and I will do my best to respond to your comments which are well recieved.

Firstly, as you discovered, your method of forming the quadrant plate and rubbing strips tends to create a result which is not a proper arc and hence causes fouling of the catch boxes and all sorts of potential issues with the free movement of the levers. The reason for this is that there is a line of weakness across the plate where the catches drop in and where the slots end and the "bend" naturally runs to that weakness causing a "thruppenny bit" shape. But much worse than this, you will have found that doing as you describe causes each of the individual quadrants to come out differently as only two of them are in contact with the frame - the other three end up wherever they want! By contrast, when you roll the whole plate, you ensure that they all come out the same.

Similarly, if you do not pre-bend the rubbing strips, you are likely to find that the quadrant collapses as you push the strip onto it - as I mention in the instructions, the quadrants are quite weak until the strips are soldered into place. I curve my quadrant strips using my thumb nail to wrap them round a solvent bottle! thay take a second each.

I think if you persevere, you will master the rolling method - Colin Parks has described his experiences in his thread and he got there in the end. Try different combinations of resilience of support and diameter of rolling pin.

In fact, I did increase the clearance to the catch box as you suggest in the first iteration of the design, but I felt it would rather spoil the appearance to go too much further - and once you have got the quadrant "right" it does all work with plenty of clearance. that said, I will certainly look at the question again when the tool needs renewal.

You are quite right that 2.5mm fastenings are considerably bigger than 8BA (2.2mm) and this does make a few of the fits a bit more problematic - the kit was designed around 8BA to avoid the need to open out the holes in the micro switches which many people will be reluctant to do so I think we must leave the choice to go the M2.5 route as a matter of personal choice. I wonder if it might actually be that M2 would be a better option?

You raise a very valid point about the provision of spare components. The springs are actually quite a big cost of the kit - to put in just one spare would increase the retail price by at least a pound - but if anyone gets in trouble with these getting lost, we can always supply spares at cost plus postage.

I have also made a note to add a spare catch box to any new tool - but a catch handle will not actually fit as there is not enough length in any of the available spaces. You will have already spotted that the "length" of the sheet is fixed by the etchers coil size and each mm on the width increases the sheet cost.

Sorry that you had to fork out for additional spares - I have not heard of anyone else needing to do that, but I will ask the Society management if they feel it would be work making "spare part" etches available for these bits.

I confess that I too managed to break a couple of catch boxes but all I did was to solder them back together - provided this is done before they are fitted, and any bead of solder on the inside is cleaned off, the repair works well and is invisible once the lever is complete.

I admit that I was completely shocked to discover that you are right about the centres of the holes for the Microswitches - they are indeed .5mm shy. As you say, it does not show with 8BA. Again I have made a note for future revision - many thanks for spotting it.

Now - a question - will you be at Scaleforum? if so please make yourself known to me (I will be the one sat behind the 75 lever frame!) and I will show you the rolling job. Same offer applies to everyone of course!

So to your final question - the configuration of the frame! Of course, my easy answer is that I made it this shape simply because the Mk 1 frame was this shape and I was maintaining compatibility. That said, this pattern of frame was by far the most common on the Real Thing with makers like Stevens, Saxby, Westinghouse etc all following this pattern. The GW however, had a "symmetric" design where the levers go as far back as forwards and this is because of the nature of the cam drive to the % bar VT locking - ironic really - since that is the design of locking I have copied!

Best Wishes,

junctionmad
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby junctionmad » Tue Aug 21, 2018 11:30 am

Thanks Howard, I have 35 more levers to make and will keep trying the rolling method , If Im lucky Ill have a proper rolling mill soon anyway

personally I found no issues tack soldering the rubbing strips in the manner I described, With the quadrant soldered on only the very outside of the quadrant is weak .Ill try the " kosher " way in the next set

+1 regards the microswitch etch hole positions

Note that I now have a batch of 50 switches , all the holes are actually 2.5mm in practice , simply running a 2.5mm drill will produce a very acceptable fit on M2,5 rod. I did try M2 rod, way to much slop in the microswitches

Thanks

I hope to be at scaleforum , I will be at Telford next week so that may scupper another trip

simply including the catch box on the etch would be a great start , if the strings were then available separately from the stories , that would suffice , the catch handles are largely retrievable if the fold fails IMHE

dave

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David B
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby David B » Tue Aug 21, 2018 2:32 pm

I have only made the Mk1 version and rolled the top plate on a cutting mat using a bar which was about 1/2" in diameter. I find the cutting mat has just enough 'give' in it to allow a bend (for any model) to be made gently, little by little. I rolled the top of the plate to shape, with a bit more of a curve, by rolling it a bit more than the bottom end. I tried it for shape after each roll, taking it slowly.

Regarding the catch boxes, I fitted these when the levers were towards me at the bottom of the more gentle curve. This made the catch more positive when the lever was put back as the top of the of the curve is a little bit further from the pivot point than the bottom. When I soldered my first catch box at the top and I found it engaged less positively at the bottom when the lever was pulled, hence the other boxes were soldered with the lever at the bottom.

JFS
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby JFS » Tue Aug 21, 2018 8:03 pm

junctionmad wrote:
I hope to be at scaleforum , I will be at Telford next week so that may scupper another trip



Hello again Dave,

If you are able to get to S4um, please bring a couple of quadrant plates with you - you will be surprised how easy it is once you have the knack..

Please don't feel you need to buy a set of rolls especially for the job - though I understand they may have other uses as well :D I have been at this game for more than 50 years and never found a need for a set yet - though folding bars are essential!

I am going to bring along a range of mats/magazines/thighs/broom handles/bits of round bar/rolling pins with the object of trying to establish just how many ways there are to skin this particular cat :D

EDIT:- thinking about it, I might shoot a couple of videos for youtube!

Best Wishes,

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Le Corbusier
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby Le Corbusier » Tue Aug 21, 2018 8:34 pm

JFS wrote:
EDIT:- thinking about it, I might shoot a couple of videos for youtube!



Yes Please :thumb
Tim Lee

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Will L
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby Will L » Tue Aug 21, 2018 8:52 pm

JFS wrote:Please don't feel you need to buy a set of rolls especially for the job - though I understand they may have other uses as well :D I have been at this game for more than 50 years and never found a need for a set yet - though folding bars are essential!

I am going to bring along a range of mats/magazines/thighs/broom handles/bits of round bar/rolling pins with the object of trying to establish just how many ways there are to skin this particular cat :D

My thigh will also be available at Scaleforum :wink:

Edited for a spelling that at least made some sense. Isn't predictive text fun.
Last edited by Will L on Wed Aug 22, 2018 9:50 am, edited 1 time in total.

junctionmad
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby junctionmad » Tue Aug 21, 2018 10:07 pm

I have now added the microswitches , These were far more " fiddley " then I expected

What are people using too fix the frame down, I used m2.5 bolts , but the head of these tends to foul the microswitches , and force them further apart then is necessary for good spacing , I cant see any head of a bolt that will fit under the microswitch


The other thing is the frame needs tying together high up on the back of the frame , I was thinking of using a spare etch to fashion joiner pieces

Personally I would prefer the microswitches to be integral to the frame , rather then a seperate assy, it then means a complete 5 unit can be " withdrawn " as a whole piece , this allows it to be tested etc , whereas now the microswitch assy is fixed to the base, and not the frame , so the whole thing has to be reassembled on a new " test" baseboard in order to get the frame functioning , This is a pain


Dave

JFS
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby JFS » Wed Aug 22, 2018 7:19 am

junctionmad wrote:I have now added the microswitches , These were far more " fiddley " then I expected

What are people using too fix the frame down, I used m2.5 bolts , but the head of these tends to foul the microswitches , and force them further apart then is necessary for good spacing , I cant see any head of a bolt that will fit under the microswitch


The other thing is the frame needs tying together high up on the back of the frame , I was thinking of using a spare etch to fashion joiner pieces

Personally I would prefer the microswitches to be integral to the frame , rather then a seperate assy, it then means a complete 5 unit can be " withdrawn " as a whole piece , this allows it to be tested etc , whereas now the microswitch assy is fixed to the base, and not the frame , so the whole thing has to be reassembled on a new " test" baseboard in order to get the frame functioning , This is a pain


Dave


Hi Dave,

In the 75 lever frame I built, I did as I wrote in the instructions - I screwed the whole thing to a timber base using 2mm countersunk wood screws - bearing in mind that I have 75 lever's worth of mechanical locking fitted. This is how it is designed, this is how the instructions illustrate it, and done this way, there is never any need for a "test" baseboard. And fitting the screws is a complete and utter - but unavoidable - pain...

You will find that with a long frame like this, you cannot simply join the whole lot together and treat it as a single unit - it is far too long and far too heavy. This is the thought-out reasoning behind the wooden base design. When this method is used as intended and as designed, there is no need whatsoever for any "rear tying in". You are of course free to deviate from the instructions in anyway you like - but when you do, please don't then criticise the design :D

I should mention that the reason that the "instructions" are so lengthy and so detailed is that I cannot expect anyone else to understand my design thinking and therefore the onus is on me to explain how to make it work. And it does work - if built as intended: I have built over 100 levers worth to demonstrate that. And I remain the only person to have fitted full mechanical locking to a 25 lever, and a 10 lever, Mk I frame - so I know a fair amount about that design also.

I hear what you say about integral micro switches - they come with considerable disadvantages. In my design, I have the levers spaced by the base plate which occupies the same space, as does the mechanical locking - so your suggestion is physically impossible as you will see when you think it through a bit. I would point out that as designed, it saves a huge amount of work making and threading the lever spacers which are the basis of the Mk I design, so my judgement is that this is the best solution.

That said, integral switches produce a nice neat result and spacers are not too bad which there are a few of them, so this is workable for "short" frames.

I wonder if I might respectfully propose that you stop suggesting "improvements" to the design unless you have fully prototyped and tested your ideas? Even a fag-packet-sketch would show you the impossibility of integral switches for example.

All design is a set of compromises and I would point out that I spent many months, and hundreds of pounds of my own money going through dozens of possible configuration of this frame - remembering that its form and function were set by the Mk I design, which might not have been the ideal starting point, but was a "given" - and whilst not everyone will agree with the final decisions I have made I would ask them at least to prototype their "alternatives" before committing them to print - well - forum space.

Perhaps a good approach for you might be to follow the instructions to the letter for your first hundred or so levers worth - I have demonstrated that this does "work" - and also build and lock 35 levers worth of frames using the Mk I design - at that point you will have the same experience as I have and we can then collaborate together on the MkIII - and it WILL be perfect. Well, at least it will be a different set of compromises. :D

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Horsetan
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby Horsetan » Sun Sep 23, 2018 5:33 pm

JFS wrote:...In the 75 lever frame I built, I did as I wrote in the instructions - I screwed the whole thing to a timber base using 2mm countersunk wood screws - bearing in mind that I have 75 lever's worth of mechanical locking fitted. This is how it is designed, this is how the instructions illustrate it, and done this way, there is never any need for a "test" baseboard. And fitting the screws is a complete and utter - but unavoidable - pain......


Image

It's clearly worth the pain. :thumb

Thought :idea: : I wonder if the lever pulls could be weighted to portray the effort of operating points and signals far away from the box :?:
That would be an ecumenical matter.

junctionmad
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby junctionmad » Mon Sep 24, 2018 5:51 pm

I wonder has anyone sourced a suitable plate/numbers that could be soldered to the lever ?

Dave

junctionmad
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby junctionmad » Mon Sep 24, 2018 7:39 pm

Howard my comments come as I build this 59 frame and are based on my experiences

My “ wish list “ is just that nothing more

The reason I mentioned a test baseboard is that is difficult to “ test the lever frame “ as the micro switches arnt an integral structure and hence as I build each 5 lever set , I am forced to create a test baseboard to verify everything is ok.
Then I disassemble that and transfer the 5 levers to the final control panel , in my case all the workings are hidden , so I need to verify all is well

My final arrangement is not like the various examples shown were the locking is all on display

The reason I mentioned tying the frames together at the back higher up , is I found over time the frame slightly flexed and separated at the back

I offer this up in the spirit of my experience , I fully appreciate the design

By the way I have worked up a solution using optical switches that sit on a pcb under the frame ( the pcb also acts as a baseboard ) Once I’ve finalised the design and ordered some boards I’ll post my experiences here

All in all the club members love the frame so far So that’s great

Thanks for your efforts

Dave

JFS
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby JFS » Mon Sep 24, 2018 10:53 pm

junctionmad wrote:Howard my comments come as I build this 59 frame and are based on my experiences

My “ wish list “ is just that nothing more

The reason I mentioned a test baseboard is that is difficult to “ test the lever frame “ as the micro switches arnt an integral structure and hence as I build each 5 lever set , I am forced to create a test baseboard to verify everything is ok.
Then I disassemble that and transfer the 5 levers to the final control panel , in my case all the workings are hidden , so I need to verify all is well

My final arrangement is not like the various examples shown were the locking is all on display

The reason I mentioned tying the frames together at the back higher up , is I found over time the frame slightly flexed and separated at the back

I offer this up in the spirit of my experience , I fully appreciate the design

By the way I have worked up a solution using optical switches that sit on a pcb under the frame ( the pcb also acts as a baseboard ) Once I’ve finalised the design and ordered some boards I’ll post my experiences here

All in all the club members love the frame so far So that’s great

Thanks for your efforts

Dave


Hello Dave,

All fully understood and thanks for the kind words. I will be interested to see the optical switch solution as I think we all know the potential limitations of micro switches.

Just on the question of lever plates; it would be necessary to produce a separate etch, and it is always difficult to know how many numbers to include (though I doubt many people would go above 70!). But it might be that a better way would be to provide "blank" plates and use home-printed transfers for the information which might then include the descriptions and "lead" lists. I might experiment a bit with this and post the results.

Given that you and others have struggled on the issue of rolling the quadrant plate, I had hoped to do a short video of this over Scaleforum, but I was just too busy. I am however going to try to get it done this week and will post a link to the result. I hope you will be pleasantly surprised at how easy it is!

Good Luck and best wishes,

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Colin Parks
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby Colin Parks » Tue Sep 25, 2018 4:52 pm

It seemed best to put some photos here to show the stage that I have reached with my four lever frame assemblies.

All the levers have finally been made. They fitted without more than the odd swipe with a needle file here and there. It is very satisfying just to operate the levers, which locate at each end of their travel with pleasing 'click'.

IMG_8978 (2).JPG


There are some slight deviations from the instructions: In this photo, it can be seen that I have cranked the catch rods slightly, just below the doubled etch which wraps around the catch rod pin. This allows the catch rod to sit parallel to the lever. The catch rods were assembled with the folded-over ends facing inwards for neatness. (Perhaps if I had assembled the catch rods the other way around there would have been no need to crank the rods. It is too late now to worry about that.)

IMG_8979 (2).JPG


Rather than soldering a wire to locate 2.5 mm lever pivot rods, I used 2.5 mm o/d brass tube with 0.5 mm holes drilled perpendicularly at each end of the 48 mm lengths. There are temporary pins holding the tubes at present, while I think of a more elegant quick-release solution.

IMG_8980 (2).JPG


Finally, the catch boxes. After one or two attempts, I found that the best way of folding the boxes was around the levers, rather than free-hand. That gave a little clearance, which allowed the catch rods to slide up and down unimpeded. It proved neccessary to bend the 'tail' of each box to insert it between the lugs and the catch on the catch rod. Once in place, the tails were eased back to almost straight. This has not proven to cause any issues (so far).

The most radical thing that I have done is to fix the catch boxes by means of the etched holes, which line up with the hole in the lever. A piece of 0.5 mm nickel silver rod has been riveted on both ends. There is no solder involved. The catch boxes can pivot slightly, making the operation of the levers nice and smooth.

IMG_8981 (2).JPG


There are one or two tweaks to do to get all the levers and catch handles in line, then it is on to the locking frame (gulp!)

junctionmad
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby junctionmad » Wed Sep 26, 2018 10:32 pm

JFS wrote:
junctionmad wrote:Howard my comments come as I build this 59 frame and are based on my experiences

My “ wish list “ is just that nothing more

The reason I mentioned a test baseboard is that is difficult to “ test the lever frame “ as the micro switches arnt an integral structure and hence as I build each 5 lever set , I am forced to create a test baseboard to verify everything is ok.
Then I disassemble that and transfer the 5 levers to the final control panel , in my case all the workings are hidden , so I need to verify all is well

My final arrangement is not like the various examples shown were the locking is all on display

The reason I mentioned tying the frames together at the back higher up , is I found over time the frame slightly flexed and separated at the back

I offer this up in the spirit of my experience , I fully appreciate the design

By the way I have worked up a solution using optical switches that sit on a pcb under the frame ( the pcb also acts as a baseboard ) Once I’ve finalised the design and ordered some boards I’ll post my experiences here

All in all the club members love the frame so far So that’s great

Thanks for your efforts

Dave


Hello Dave,

All fully understood and thanks for the kind words. I will be interested to see the optical switch solution as I think we all know the potential limitations of micro switches.

Just on the question of lever plates; it would be necessary to produce a separate etch, and it is always difficult to know how many numbers to include (though I doubt many people would go above 70!). But it might be that a better way would be to provide "blank" plates and use home-printed transfers for the information which might then include the descriptions and "lead" lists. I might experiment a bit with this and post the results.

Given that you and others have struggled on the issue of rolling the quadrant plate, I had hoped to do a short video of this over Scaleforum, but I was just too busy. I am however going to try to get it done this week and will post a link to the result. I hope you will be pleasantly surprised at how easy it is!

Good Luck and best wishes,


A plate and numerals 1-9 several times would be sufficient , numbers could be soldered on etc

My question was if anyone is doing something like this already ?

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Flymo748
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby Flymo748 » Thu Sep 27, 2018 6:30 am

junctionmad wrote:
A plate and numerals 1-9 several times would be sufficient , numbers could be soldered on etc

My question was if anyone is doing something like this already ?


Anyone who has built one of the Society's Mark 1 lever frames should have a large number of spare plates lying around. Each etch comes with 1-50 on the sheet of nickel silver.

Perhaps there is scope in the Private Sales area for a "dating" facility to match those "WLTM" with those "open to Offers"? I'd suggest that a simple provision of an SAE would do the trick.

There may be a paucity of 1-5 plates, given every lever frame has to start somewhere. But those should be available from anyone who has built a second or subsequent kit.

Cheers
Flymo
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junctionmad
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby junctionmad » Thu Sep 27, 2018 3:06 pm

Flymo748 wrote:
junctionmad wrote:
A plate and numerals 1-9 several times would be sufficient , numbers could be soldered on etc

My question was if anyone is doing something like this already ?


Anyone who has built one of the Society's Mark 1 lever frames should have a large number of spare plates lying around. Each etch comes with 1-50 on the sheet of nickel silver.

Perhaps there is scope in the Private Sales area for a "dating" facility to match those "WLTM" with those "open to Offers"? I'd suggest that a simple provision of an SAE would do the trick.

There may be a paucity of 1-5 plates, given every lever frame has to start somewhere. But those should be available from anyone who has built a second or subsequent kit.

Cheers
Flymo


OK, so I could buy an etch to get the numbers , great , thanks


dave

JFS
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby JFS » Thu Sep 27, 2018 9:38 pm

junctionmad wrote:
OK, so I could buy an etch to get the numbers , great , thanks


dave


I don't recall anyone suggesting that for a moment. The etches Paul was referring to are all in the scrap boxes up and down the land. I have quite a large pile of them as it happens.
Last edited by JFS on Thu Sep 27, 2018 9:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.

JFS
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby JFS » Thu Sep 27, 2018 9:45 pm

Colin Parks wrote:It seemed best to put some photos here to show the stage that I have reached with my four lever frame assemblies.



Hello Colin,

That is an extremely tidy and neat piece of work there - very well done. As a designer, it is always gratifying to see someone making an effort to do the job to a proper standard. And I suspect it will repay your effort by working every bit as well as it looks!

Looking forward to seeing your locking - I have every confidence!


Very Best Wishes,

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Colin Parks
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby Colin Parks » Fri Sep 28, 2018 2:56 pm

Hello Howard,

Praise indeed!

The locking frame will be a great challenge, which I am hoping to assemble to the point where the frame can be used to operate the switches, while I come to terms with the ins and outs of locking nibs and so on.

In G A Pryor's book 'Southern Railway Signals', there are various designs of frame illustrated. Almost all the catch rod designs shown are cranked just below the catch handle, so that they lie flat against the back of the levers. My only concern now is how to paint the levers without gumming up the lever mechanisms.

Colin

junctionmad
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby junctionmad » Fri Sep 28, 2018 8:32 pm

JFS wrote:
junctionmad wrote:
OK, so I could buy an etch to get the numbers , great , thanks


dave


I don't recall anyone suggesting that for a moment. The etches Paul was referring to are all in the scrap boxes up and down the land. I have quite a large pile of them as it happens.


Err , I meant , great thsnks , quite happy to buy an mk1 etch to get the numbers

junctionmad
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Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby junctionmad » Sun Oct 14, 2018 10:34 am

Just an update re lever numbers , I notice DCC Concepts do a separate pack of brass numbers for their lever , which might be useful to number the mk2 levers

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Joined: Wed Dec 16, 2009 3:47 pm

Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby JFS » Sun Oct 14, 2018 8:18 pm

Colin Parks wrote:Hello Howard,
My only concern now is how to paint the levers without gumming up the lever mechanisms.


Hello Colin,

I did mine by removing them all, then using "Rattle cans" - one coat of grey primer, then a top coat. I masked off the handles and all the bits below the quadrant - you can batch all the red one black ones etc masking them together for ease of manipulation. If you mask them with the catch handles "pulled" it will mean that the catches will be inside the catch boxes which stops the paint getting to them - although the catches will gum-up, the paint is quite brittle so a bit of a wiggle will free them off. (well it worked for me, no guarantees though!

I used the same method for the quadrant tops.

Levers.jpg


Very Best Wishes,

JFS
Posts: 586
Joined: Wed Dec 16, 2009 3:47 pm

Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby JFS » Sun Oct 14, 2018 8:21 pm

junctionmad wrote:
Err , I meant , great thanks , quite happy to buy an mk1 etch to get the numbers


Ah - that is different :thumb

... perils of forum misunderstandings ... :D


Best WIshes,

junctionmad
Posts: 216
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 3:38 pm

Re: Mk2 Lever frame musings

Postby junctionmad » Sun Oct 14, 2018 11:17 pm

JFS wrote:
junctionmad wrote:
Err , I meant , great thanks , quite happy to buy an mk1 etch to get the numbers


Ah - that is different :thumb

... perils of forum misunderstandings ... :D


Best WIshes,



no worries !

I just ordered the DCC Concepts numbering system, DCS-CS99, panels are 5.5mm by 9mm, so should be nice , numbers run 1-99 , £11 from Hattons

dave


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