3D printing - resolution and finish

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proto87stores

3D printing - resolution and finish

Postby proto87stores » Sat Jan 26, 2019 1:04 am

I'm extremely impressed with Bill Bedford's work on 3D printed loco wheels. The resolution and finish appear, to my eyes at least, near perfection. I am of course curious as to the 3D printing method used. One of the supplies still lacking in the Proto:87 world is a wide range of Steam Loco Wheels. We are currently limited to Diesels, Electrics and Rolling stock. That level of 3D printing could be a major step forward.

However, I am confused by the noticeable striped finish on "dclift's" wagon, also apparently 3D printed by Bill. Was that produced by a different method?

Andy

PS. I did some searching and noticed that SCC have a scaled down to HO, UK loco body in their catalog. Taken together with the above, that rather opens up a possibility of viable UK HO, or even P:87, for UK outline, without waiting for a mainstream UK manufacturer to offer a decent range of models. If so, would the S4 Society be interested in a second shot at supporting P:87, or would there need to be a separate organization?

dclift
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Joined: Sun Jul 26, 2009 1:35 pm

Re: 3D printing - resolution and finish

Postby dclift » Sun Jan 27, 2019 11:49 am

Lest it should be thought that I am criticising the kit, I should say that it was the easiest kit I have ever put together and I am very happy with the result. I am impressed by the 3d printing which is very good indeed. The striations on the wagon before painting, though visible, were not as prominent as they became after painting. The grey paint is very glossy, probably due to it being at least twenty years old. The photograph exaggerates the striations even further. Bill's advice not to use gloss paint seems to me to be very sound, though I believe that transfers can be applied more successfully to a gloss surface. I propose to leave the paint to harden for a couple of weeks after which I shall probably apply the transfers followed by a coat of Dullcote, without weathering, in order to see whether the striations become less obvious. As a last resort, there is always the possibility of stripping it back and starting again.
David Clift.

Knuckles
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Re: 3D printing - resolution and finish

Postby Knuckles » Sun Jan 27, 2019 1:30 pm

proto87stores wrote:PS. I did some searching and noticed that SCC have a scaled down to HO, UK loco body in their catalog. Taken together with the above, that rather opens up a possibility of viable UK HO, or even P:87, for UK outline, without waiting for a mainstream UK manufacturer to offer a decent range of models. If so, would the S4 Society be interested in a second shot at supporting P:87, or would there need to be a separate organization?


If there is a particular item in the current SCC range you'd like to obtain in H0 just let me know and it can be sorted pretty easily, all the loco bodies for example can be done in H0 if there is any demand for them. I don't charge to do re-scales, although after the amount of messing about I have received from people asking for something then changing their mind once done I might change my mind on that.
“He who dares not offend cannot be honest.” Thomas Paine

http://www.shapeways.com/shops/sparksho ... eationsscc
Mostly offering Loco kits & bits in 4mm.
SCC Photon Resin Prints Price list
download/file.php?id=19320

Proto87stores

Re: 3D printing - resolution and finish

Postby Proto87stores » Sun Jan 27, 2019 6:05 pm

Thanks for the replies.

Please note, I don't want to mislead anyone.

I already have some 3D printing and machining capability, so would not be particularly interested in purchasing other's commercial bodies for myself. What I lack, due to other hobby/work priorities for the next year or so, are suitable 3D CAD files for printing model bodies that I can provide excellent working suspension chassis and mechanisms for. The goal here being making available Proto-scale fully RTR and simple (no skill) RTR kit vehicles, to greatly expand membership and practice of the Proto-scale areas of the hobby.

Andy

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Jol Wilkinson
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Re: 3D printing - resolution and finish

Postby Jol Wilkinson » Mon Jan 28, 2019 8:26 am

Andy,

does the "no skill" requirement indicate the model will be in a self opening box?

What is a RTR kit vehicle? Surely it is one thing or the other. Would the concept, used by Hornby and Co of a RTR model to which you add the extra detail parts, be what you have in mind? Even that is beyond some buyers.

Jol

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jon price
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Re: 3D printing - resolution and finish

Postby jon price » Mon Jan 28, 2019 9:50 am

I'm guessing the RTR kit referred to is a fairly standard North American thing. You get a fully finished body, a clip-in chassis, bogies that are attached by screws, and drop-in wheelsets. So there needs be no painting or gluing to produce a running wagon.

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LesGros
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Re: 3D printing - resolution and finish

Postby LesGros » Mon Jan 28, 2019 11:23 am

Modern R/C vehicles can be purchased in the forms: Ready to Fly; RTF, and Almost Ready to Fly; ARTF.

I interpret the Hornby RTR as equivalent to RTF and, Andy's HO kit as being equivalent to ARTF, which requires a few essential fittings to be carried out by the purchaser. In the case of R/C aircraft, this is often the installation of a different make of Tx/Rx radio control; items such as servos being built-in by the manufacturer.
LesG

The man who never made a mistake
never made anything useful

proto87stores

Re: 3D printing - resolution and finish

Postby proto87stores » Mon Jan 28, 2019 2:37 pm

My apologies. My word " skill" probably should have been "skilled craftsmanship". My idea of an "RTR kit" would be a set of guaranteed to work parts that only only need the labour intensive, and manufacturer costly, "final assembly" to be performed by the purchaser, using only such simple tools as a screwdriver, a pair of tweezers or needle nose pliers and maybe a fine nozzle tube of glue. No measuring, cutting or filing to size/shape of raw material.

My historical examples of such would be "plastic kits", such as the original "Airfix" and "Revell" range, but with the also necessary, screw or clip together metal mechanical parts. Imagine if the Kitmaster Mk 1's had come with metal wheel sets, bearings and working suspension parts, couplers and sprung buffers, that you just put together. . . and were still priced competitively vs. regular HO.

Pre-painted liveries is a grey area - I have no great answer for that. But if I just do chassis/mechanisms, then it's probably not needed.

You can't accurately shoot what you don't aim for.

Andy


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