Air Brush Recommendation

Products you use that you would like to recommend.
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John Bateson
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Air Brush Recommendation

Postby John Bateson » Fri Dec 04, 2015 6:58 pm

A young lady of my acquaintance is insisting she gets me something for Christmas ...
Any thoughts please about a decent air brush - I have seen the Eileen lists and got thoroughly confused, but that is, as the young lady is often wont to say, nothing out of the ordinary.
John
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Mike Garwood
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby Mike Garwood » Fri Dec 04, 2015 9:20 pm

John

If you can find them then Asturo CV. Come with different size needles. I use 0.3 mm, but I know Morgan Gilbert uses one with 0.5 mm needle. They spray cellulose like a charm and dead easy to use and clean, they're ok with that enamel stuff, but I have very limited experience of spraying enamel as I don't use it.
For acrylics I use Paasche VLSTPRO. Comes with 2 needles, fine and medium. Also in the box are a bunch of mixing cups and the gravity cup to spray from. This is a dual action brush. I had it from the states and it was $150, in the UK it was priced at £150, so even paying import tax of £16 I had a bargain. It's 10 years old now and spares are still available.

Personally I prefer a gun to a brush, far easier to master and get a good finish.

https://airbrushes.com/index.php

If you need any advice, give these chaps a ring, totally know what they're talking about. The website is chock full of goodies.

Mike

Winander
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby Winander » Sat Dec 05, 2015 12:56 pm

John,

I got an Iwata HP-C Plus direct from Japan from a seller on Amazon. It was £73 but I doubt the guarantee is valid. I've just googled and it's currently twice that price in the UK. My thoughts were that if they are guaranteed for 10 years, then they are unlikely to break. All the excise duties and VAT were included and it didn't take too long to arrive. There may be a problem with spares, particularly the needles, but I never found a definitive answer and decided to carry on regardless, assuming the supplier would be able to help. The transaction went through smoothly. PM me if you want details of the supplier.

regards
Richard Hodgson

MikeH
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby MikeH » Sat Dec 05, 2015 5:04 pm

Winander wrote:John,

I got an Iwata HP-C Plus direct from Japan from a seller on Amazon. It was £73 but I doubt the guarantee is valid. I've just googled and it's currently twice that price in the UK. My thoughts were that if they are guaranteed for 10 years, then they are unlikely to break. All the excise duties and VAT were included and it didn't take too long to arrive. There may be a problem with spares, particularly the needles, but I never found a definitive answer and decided to carry on regardless, assuming the supplier would be able to help. The transaction went through smoothly. PM me if you want details of the supplier.

regards


Bargin! I wouldn't worry about spares.. https://airbrushes.com/parts_info.php?o ... ucts_id=34 ;)

I do agree with you about Iwata, From my research they seem to be one of the best brands, Although I am sure many other maybe even cheaper brands will do just as good job. I am also looking into purchasing an airbrush soon and will for sure go with Iwata

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David Thorpe
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby David Thorpe » Sat Dec 05, 2015 6:03 pm

I personally prefer a pistol grip/trigger mechanism to the more usual button one and have been very happy with my Sparmax GP-35.
http://www.modellingtools.co.uk/sparmax ... 3723-p.asp

DT

dal-t
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby dal-t » Sat Dec 05, 2015 7:44 pm

The trigger v button issue is worth careful consideration if you're not already a commited airbrush user. I would have opted for a trigger last time I bought if I hadn't been teaching myself to use a button properly since the 1970s (although I still have to consciously 'throw' the mental switch each time I change from a single-action to a double-action brush). The traditional dual-action mechanism undoubtedly requires a 'knack', and not everyone gets it. Some also feel that the trigger-pull action improves their control over where the paint jet is pointing. Ultimately this may come down - as do other elements of the choice you have to make - to what you intend to use the brush for. It's a mistake to assume that just because an expert gun, in the hands of an expert user, can achieve exceptionally intricate results, everything should be driven by that - 98% of the time it's likely to be used for simply applying a good, even coat of a single colour.
David L-T

DougN
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby DougN » Sun Dec 06, 2015 11:17 pm

I'm with Mike on the Paashe VL air brush. I purchased mine second hand here in Melbourne at a exhibition, works a charm. It was a steal at $50 aussie dollars. The nice thing about the Paashe is the parts are readily available from the local model shops. A bit like the badger products they have been around so long the parts are a stock item.

Strangely years ago I had thought to buy a Paashe as i had a chance to buy one wholesale and the price was well over $200 at the time.

Since I have been using it I have been very happy with the dual action and the spare bits that came in the box. From memory there are 3 needles and nozzles a mixing jar, a small jar, a large Jar and a cup. I have yet to use anything larger than the cup.
Doug
Still not doing enough modelling

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John Bateson
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby John Bateson » Mon Dec 07, 2015 4:18 pm

OK, bit the bullet using my wife's money.
Gone for an IWATA HP-C PLUS which comes from the Far East, a kit which includes a few connectors and stuff.
I had thought that problems I had in the past were down to my rather useless compressor, one I bought from Squires many years ago, so have also ordered a FoxHunter KMS Airbrush Kit AS186 which also comes with some extras.
Merry Christmas to me I hope!
Thanks for all the suggestions.

John
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Knuckles
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby Knuckles » Thu Jan 14, 2016 10:14 am

Just saw this thread and thought I'd add my 2d.

I use a Badger Cresendo airbrush. It can also spray ink so it might be too good for my basic needs of enamel and occasional acrylic use.

Brought it 5 or so years ago as my 1st one and have never looked back. It comes with 3 nib sizes, a colour cup and a couple of bigger sealable containers. It may have had other bits in the set but cannot remember off my head.

I use a Wiz Air compressor (0-50 PSI) that cost me around £50-60 if I remember correctly and the air brush itself was £100. I usually aim to spray at about 23-28PSI.

After each spray I strip the brush fully and rub thinners into all the bits and so far it we've had a good relationship - sounds wrong that, oh well.
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Allan Goodwillie
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Fri Jan 15, 2016 10:28 pm

Hi John,

I hope you are enjoying your new purchase. I have had a Badger for 30 years and not required any spares and it still works very well indeed. I used to teach airbrushing in school to my higher students. The compressor I used could drive 4/5 at a time and was a piston driven one with a tank. You could get up to quite high pressures adjustable via a controle valve which had an inner (tank) pressure gauge as well as a gauge for the line pressure. This also had a water trap built in which allows you to blow out any water in the air before it goes anywhere near the airbrush - quite important while spraying as you do not want condensed water mixing with oil based paint. It is possible to get a simple in line water trap, which will work, but I prefer the other one, a little more expensive, but the readouts are very helpful when operating the brush, stops you blowing your air line.

A few basic tips may be worthwhile at this stage for those who have never used one.

1) How do you get to know where exactly you are spraying?

Try this - put up a piece of squared paper, put some ink into the brush to try it. Turn the pressure up until it just starts to go through the brush - the Badger has a dual action which means pushing air through and then pulling back to add the liquid. Practice makes perfect. Now to the paper. Pin the paper up and gently spray a small quantity of ink on a pair of crosslines so to speak, OK the first may be off, but you will be surprised just how quickly you get your eye in. The kids used to get quite competitive about this, but could become very adept quickly.

2) What mix do I use?

Well this depends on a number of things - heavier materials will require more solvent in the mix - could I suggest using one of the small pipettes you can buy on tool stands these days. You can then make the mix work with you every time depending on what paint is your favourite. Marking a line on the pipette allows a nice simple measurement. Some materials go through better than others for several reasons which we may get to later. When mixing paints before they go into the brush it is important to make sure they are well mixed and no sign of any grainy bits which might get in the way of a good session. I mix my paint in a small white glass container which used to hold meat paste. The white shows up particles particularly well.

A badly blocked airbrush needs disassembly, but as an alternative taking the paint cup off the airbrush and placing the end of the airbrush in a container of thinners and blowing through can help clear it, alternativly closing off the spray end and blowing through air may blow out the offending material via the cuphole - although this should be done with a cloth over the opening as it will be messy.

3) Keep your equipment clean!

Always allow enough time for cleaning your airbrush properly - this is where most problems arise. When working in school every day I had the pupils blow out their airbrushes and blow water through them immediately their work was finished. Blow the water through until there is no residual colour showing, In school we were using inks or watercolour/ acrylic paint only.

If using oil based paints clear the brush in a similar way, but using the correct solvent to clear the brush. I keep some solvent in a tin and re-use this in the early stages of cleaning each time, finishing off with a little fresh clear solvent at the end, until no residue of colour shows. The stuff kept for the next time can be carefully poured into a jar for use and the dregs done away with. The same method can be used for cellulose, using the correct thinners.

If you are doing several locos over a number of days in the week and using enamels it is possible to leave the airbrush in a bath of thinners in between sprays, if leaving for a shorter time - a cup of tea? - then wrapping it up in a small poly bag and a quick rubber band keeps everything from drying out.

4) Anything special about acrylics?

Working with acrylics can be tricky in that if the temperature is too high or your mix does not have enough water it starts to dry as soon as it starts to come out of the airbrush. This will have two effects-

a) The paint will build up quickly on the airbrush needle and it will require cleaning in a fairly short time.
b) The particles of paint will start to combine and dry out before reaching the surface being painted causing an orange peel effect on the surface.

The answer is to add to the acrylic mix some artists (Windsor and Newton's) flow formula. This has been designed to overcome this very problem. There are examples of Acrylic paint ready mixed for spraying and as far as I know have some form of this ready mixed. I must admit I still always add flow formula to be sure.

5) Anything about cellulose that I need to know?

I have less experience of cellulose - it perhaps gives the best finish of all and does spray beautifully. Dinky toys were all sprayed using it without a primer layer according to film I have seen. It does stick particularly well compared to the other types of paint. It does dry quicker and quicker in the brush - I tend to clean out immediately when finished and make sure all is clean.

6)The other form of compressor?

This is known as a diaphram compressor which creates pulsing and does not give such an even spray. With either type, practice again using a piece of paper - start your spray before it reaches the paper then spray as evenly as you can across the sheet until beyond the other side. Stopping will create a build up. getting closer and further from the sheet will also lead to uneveness, so eventually you will spray at the same distance and at a steady speed - again practice will make even.

6) Finally - but most important of all Make sure you use a mask and some form of extraction when working. I have a fold up extractor which sits on the bench when I am working, use it for soldering as well. Proper ventilation is important to your health. Clean hands are also important, but I am sure we are all careful chaps.

I know this is all basic John, enjoy it all, it's great having something new to work with - you may find that after a while it may alter the way you build locomotives. It will lead you into building your locos so that they can be broken down for painting! Another area for another time.

DougN
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby DougN » Sat Jan 16, 2016 10:10 am

The one thing I would add to the list of most useful items and that is to use disposable neoprene gloves. The local hardware chain or auto parts store probably a pack of 100pairs is really cheap... The other store may be a chemist but that is taking the sterile cleanliness is. Step too far!
Doug
Still not doing enough modelling

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John Bateson
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby John Bateson » Sat Jan 16, 2016 10:23 am

Alan,
The new purchase has been road tested and the 'lady in the big house' was suitable impressed at the use to which all her money had been put.
I do have a mask and filter as well as a small spray booth and turntable complete with pipe to lead out of the window - but its -5C here so its not been tested as a full system yet.
I think my old Badgers (and the compressor) were about 20 years old but they were single action and I am finding the new double action to be very useful indeed - even treated my self to one of the 'cleansing' jars, which should save my usual trick of painting my fingers with whatever I was trying to clean out of the gun. I also have a bag of disposable pipettes for the mixing - I will experiment when it is a bit warmer. And a set of 10 small jars for keeping unused paint, all extremely cheap on Amazon or Ebay, less than a tenner for the pipettes, jars and some syringes. The original equipment has gone to a good home, a member of this parish who wants to try air-brushing.
The new compressor was well worth while and has much better control with its reservoir.
John

Just noticed a post from Doug - yes a 100 pack of St. Johns Ambulance costs about £3 - should also be useful for all those glass fibre splinters I get when preparing models!
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Andy W
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby Andy W » Sat Jan 16, 2016 11:59 am

Dual control brushes give you much better control. Interior corners can receive lighter coats and the covering built up. Also if it looks like there's an area where the paint is too thick you can "chase" potential runs etc away by just using air.
Last edited by Andy W on Sat Jan 16, 2016 1:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Knuckles
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby Knuckles » Sat Jan 16, 2016 12:28 pm

I know it wasn't directed to me but may I just thank you, Mr Goodwillie for such a useful bank of information. I'll come here before I get my air brush out next for revision and learning. :)

I failed to say above my air brush is duel action too. Picked up the technique almost instantly but as for single action I have never used one. I use enamels mostly but have used the equipment with acrylic. It went on the model fine but as written above it dries quick in the airbrush so cleaning it required a full blown strip. Didn't come off easy either. :/
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Allan Goodwillie
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Sat Jan 16, 2016 7:31 pm

Hi Knuckles, :D

The use of acrylic flow formula will help the drying and buildup as I suggested. Dual action is best for control, it takes a little longer to get used to it, but once settled in as you and John have already discovered, it makes the job much more controlable and pleasurable. :)

There is nothing wrong with single action, which is fine for general use on scenery etc. John has suggested that I write up something for the snooze, which I might just get around to as I have a number of locomotives needing painted in the near future and I could photograph what I am doing as I go along.

Despite having an airbrush I still use spray cans from time to time particularly to prime models - some of the sprayheads are excellent these days. Incidentally I have already done something on preparation of surfaces and painting using sprays, during the West Scotland "Build a Loco" thread in the beginners section, which is also relevant to what we are doing. You might just want to go and have a look if you have not come across it yet. (It is in the 2nd section)

Knuckles
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby Knuckles » Sun Jan 17, 2016 9:05 am

I'll definetly consider implimenting that solution (little half joke there).

I kind of ruled out acrylic as not worth air brushing due to the faff but I may reconsider now. My choice in paint type is mainly the colour itself. Does it look right? Bung it in then. I like both main types for different reasons.

I find with normal brush painting some acrylics are easier to use and flow easier, plus they dry quicker but some are not as smooth and a wee grainy. Enamels are stronger and usually to my eye look more realistic once completed. I find the application is hit and miss though. With Humbrol some paints are really nice to work with and some are useless almost.

Pheonix Precision on the other hand....well, I'm a fan boy. Every session using those has made my axles tingle.

With air brushing however I find all the paints seem to apply similarly good, it is just the cleaning with acrylics that is a sorry sow.

In the 3rd Right Track DVD Ian Rathbone says single action air brushes are good for priming when you want a consistently controlled application. Again though I never have used a single action so cannot say.

I often look for a spray can to prime models and also if the main colour is in a spray can I'll often use it simply for quickness. It is a 2 second job 2 or 3 times in a day with a few hours in between coats usually. I find the 24 hour rule has never been needed for me at least.

If I can't find the colour or if I have it in a tin then I get the air brush out.
Although it takes longer and I usually strip it after every spray (uncalled for apparently but I take no chances with it) resulting in several strips a day - I do enjoy it very much.

There is something about the sound and feel of the whole thing that I like so much.

Weathering though....never tried it with an air brush.

You ever used a Badger Cresendo, any opinion on it?
“He who dares not offend cannot be honest.” Thomas Paine

http://www.shapeways.com/shops/sparksho ... eationsscc
Mostly offering Loco kits & bits in 4mm.
SCC Photon Resin Prints Price list
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John Bateson
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby John Bateson » Wed May 25, 2016 2:15 pm

To respond to the note in SN197 "Foryou, Forme, Forum" I should note that the advice from Allan was read, inwardly digested and printed out for my files. I perhaps should have responded more explicitly and for that omission I must offer my apologies.

As an aside, it should be noted that "Allan" here in Wales, especially at stations, usually means "Way Out" and in my more youthful days that meant "like, way cool, man" which is perhaps a measure of the excellent advice offered.

John

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Tonycardall
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby Tonycardall » Mon Jun 13, 2016 10:01 am

I've only just become aware, through Snooze, of this item so it will be a bit late for some but may be of assistance to those who have not yet taken the airbrushing plunge. If you have never tried airbrushing, as I hadn't, and want to know if it is for you and, if so, what equipment to buy, I thoroughly recommend going on one of the courses available. I tried to book up for a painting and weathering course at Missenden but they were fully booked but were good enough to recommend that I try Pendon. The Pendon course was run by Mick Bonwick and it was truly excellent. I have absolutely no artistic skills but came away with a shopping list and now am fully equipped and really enjoying getting the airbrush out. if you are considering buying a brush, compressor, extractor etc. you are going spend quite a few pounds and so the cost of the course and the skills and knowledge that you will gain are money well spent. I have no connection to Pendon or any other place that provide such courses other than as a very happy customer. I understand that Pendon don't have a budget for advertising, just ring them up to find out what is available and when. To see some of Mick Bonwick's work see: https://www.flickr.com/photos/laughinglobster

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Allan Goodwillie
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Tue Jun 14, 2016 2:33 pm

Hi Knuckles,

You ever used a Badger Cresendo, any opinion on it?


The crescendo 175 airbrush http://airbrushtechniquemagazine.com/airbrush/badger-175-crescendo-airbrush-review/ is an update of the one I use as my standard airbrush. I have been using it for 40 years now and it still works well. It is dual action - push down for air and then pull back for paint and reverse the two actions for turning off again - never just let go - otherwise you will get a splatter either at that point or the next switching on of air.

It is internal mix and I do clean properly after each session or leave the head sitting in water or a thinner bath if overnight or during long terms away - shopping etc. It has three spray heads for doing different jobs. The finer heads are more useable for locos and stock and the larger one for track etc. - although the small head is also very useful for spray painting the rails when building track. :thumb

Something I was able to buy at the time was a heavier handle piece which gives a better balance in the hand if using jars. If using regularly, it comes with a little piece of metal that acts like a holding hand so that it is less likely to empty the contents all over your painting area. There are also small turntables available from Squires which are useful for painting and weathering and again cheap. :)

Knuckles
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby Knuckles » Fri Jun 17, 2016 8:50 pm

Allan Goodwillie wrote:Hi Knuckles,

You ever used a Badger Cresendo, any opinion on it?




(EDIT: You were quoting me, and like a numpty I thought you were asking me, DUURRRR! :-o :? so anyway no worries, I'll leave the post below intact.)



Um...well, I find it funny you posting this because that as it happens is the exact model I own. Is the only air brush I have ever purchased, used and I love it very much. :thumb

Unsure what to say as I picked the basic technique up almost instantly. Only ever had slight issues when using non model formulated acrylics as they dry mightily quick but I give the thing down a complete strip after every spray and make sure it is gleaming with thinners. Many say this isn't needed and just a spray through is needed but I paid over £100 or so when I first got it so I do my best to keep it happy.

Once the needle seemed a little off having splatters and having a close look the end curled ever so slightly, you could feel it so a gentle 1 directional tweak on some abrasive paper cured it.

I usually use the medium nib for spraying engines. Never used it for anything else thus far.

As I understand it, it can spray inks and all sorts and when I 1st brought it the diversity in use was one reason I decided to go for it. I may never use its full potential but I feel safe in my mind knowing that as long as I continue to use it and treat it the way I have been then it should last me for life all being well.

I have no desire to buy another one unless I want to venture into etching primers and things, in which case I guess I'd buy a single action going by Ian Rathbone's advice.

EDIT 2: Might as well add a bit now. You seem to find the finer head better for loco spraying so I may try this again. I had the finer head in before but for some reason changed it. Can't remember why.

Tonycardall wrote:...if you are considering buying a brush, compressor, extractor etc. you are going spend quite a few pounds and so the cost of the course and the skills and knowledge that you will gain are money well spent.


I've been wanting to go Missenden for ages but I'm guessing I never will because I highly doubt they will allow me to turn up on the Sunday only. Same issue with exhibiting or trading, I'm doubting an exhibition manager would let someone be there for only one day.

Any ideas on this? I can only go to these type things on Sunday.
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Will L
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby Will L » Fri Jun 17, 2016 9:23 pm

Knuckles wrote:...I have no desire to buy another one unless I want to venture into etching primers and things, in which case I guess I'd buy a single action going by Ian Rathbone's advice.


Enlighten me, why would a single action brush be preferred for self etch primers and things?

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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby Knuckles » Fri Jun 17, 2016 9:48 pm

Hi Will,

It has been a long time since I watched Right Track 3 but if I remember correctly it was partly due to a consistent spread but moreso because of the etching agents.

Apparently after doing a lot of sprays it can start to eat away at your airbrush so he recomends having a dedicated cheaper single action brush that isn't so much of a bummer to replace.

Going from memory so the details may be off but the jist is intact I'm sure. Maybe for occasional infrequent users like me it wouldn't matter much.
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Paul Willis
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby Paul Willis » Sat Jun 18, 2016 6:39 pm

Knuckles wrote:Hi Will,

It has been a long time since I watched Right Track 3 but if I remember correctly it was partly due to a consistent spread but moreso because of the etching agents.

Apparently after doing a lot of sprays it can start to eat away at your airbrush so he recomends having a dedicated cheaper single action brush that isn't so much of a bummer to replace.

Going from memory so the details may be off but the jist is intact I'm sure. Maybe for occasional infrequent users like me it wouldn't matter much.


I have used my airbrush to spray self-etch primer in the past. The airbrush is a Badger 120, which now must be about thirty years old. And the self-etch primer is the two-part stuff sold by Comet.

I only aim to give the models a very thin coat. After all, we're not trying to change the colour of the model, nor lay down a base coat to hide blemishes. I don't have any pictures of models in just the primer itself. However this one shows the first coats of GER blue going on over the top of the primer. Particularly on the tram you can see how thin the primer coat is:

GER Y6 tram 018.jpg


I wouldn't say that the primer "eats" the airbrush simply by being sprayed. Not is the short term. But I am very careful to throw a dust cover over the model and then start running cellulose thinners through the airbrush as soon as possible. Even more so than usual, it has a good clean and a wipe over with thinners before putting it away. I wouldn't like to try and dislodge self-etch primer that had dried in an airbrush.

So I'd say to give it a try, but do be careful.
HTH
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Allan Goodwillie
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Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Sat Jun 18, 2016 8:23 pm

There are a number of external mix air brushes on the market which make it easier to clean up and are fairly cheap for doing things like using etched primers. I hope you are using a mask when spraying as some of the materials available are not very good for you, especially chromium primer :evil: which I would definitely not spray with, due to the chromium content. Fine thinned and brushed, but otherwise I would not recommend.

You mentioned the needle going out of true - rather than sanding down, just try rolling the needle around its point and re-centring it - most times this works if for some reason it has gone out slightly. The worry about sanding down slightly is that, if not perfect it is possible to end up with a slight blow which is always there - a bit like a loco cylinder leaking. :(

When cleaning be careful not to knock out the small central part of the head where the needle feeds snugly in to the head itself as this part is fixed in place using wax. I believe (as It is not something I have had happen to mine in all the years I have had it), difficult to get centred properly again if disturbed. :thumb

Knuckles
Posts: 1225
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2011 9:15 pm

Re: Air Brush Recommendation

Postby Knuckles » Sat Jun 18, 2016 8:45 pm

Hi Flymo. :) I have never tried etch primer in all honesty. I have got on fine with bog standard Halfords primer for brass but I have chipped the top of tenders a couple of times so maybe that is why I should start? ;)

My reply to Will was mainly from memory. I think Ian Rathbone possibly is living in a different context than a lot of us as he paints professionally for a living whereas us, well, me at least is an occasional painter whenever I complete a model, I doubt it would matter that much.

Being a guy who likes to avoid faff the single pack etch primers appeal more. Not surprised are you? :D But seriously, any major difference? I gather 2 part is better seeing as Ian uses it.

That a J15 I spy?

Hi Allan :)

I'm unsure what you mean regarding wax so what I have done is just took my air brush out and stripped it to the exact level that I do after each spray, maybe you could help with a picture a little. I know the brush can be broken down more but this is pretty much a 90% strip anyway, the only other bits are the air intake and the pressure spring adjuster thingigummy.

Badger Strip.jpg
“He who dares not offend cannot be honest.” Thomas Paine

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Mostly offering Loco kits & bits in 4mm.
SCC Photon Resin Prints Price list
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