Unusual goods yards at branch line termini

johnWM
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Unusual goods yards at branch line termini

Postby johnWM » Thu Oct 23, 2008 6:23 pm

This thread is about an aspect of terminus design; a subject very relevant to anyone designing their own track plan rather than copying a particular prototype directly.

Most real termini seem to have had the rail access to the goods yard from the junction end of the station. For stations varying from minimal to medium sized there seems to be a preference for access straight from the yard onto the running line so that departing trains could continue from the yard towards the junction. There are scores of examples from Blairgowrie to Blagdon (plan 1).
fig 1.JPG
fig 1.JPG (8.74 KiB) Viewed 8092 times

The larger the station the more likely it seems to be that the yard had a headshunt. The presence of a headshunt or shunting neck, also seems to be linked to whether there is a falling gradient as you leave the station.

The only example of a prototype small terminus that I have come across that had reversed access to the goods yard was Holywell Town on the LNWR. (Plan 2).
fig 2.JPG
fig 2.JPG (9.43 KiB) Viewed 8092 times

Model examples on the other hand, seem to be more common, or is that just my perception? There probably are more prototype examples than just Holywell town, but I am not aware of them.
The reason for the reversed access at Holywell Town seems to have been partly due to the very restricted nature of the site and partly due to a ruling 1 in 27 gradient and the need to avoid runaway wagons. British Railways Journal No 40 contains an excellent article, with good photographs and a very interesting description of how goods trains were run on such a severe gradient and a detailed explanation of how they were shunted at the terminus. A gem of an article. Short trains, with 2 brake vans, with a very short shunting neck made for a real life shunting puzzle railway.

Does anyone know of any other small or even medium sized termini that have reversed access to the goods yard?

Before anyone mentions it, Hemyock does not count! Iain Rice's design for Witheridge in his "Finescale in Small Spaces" book had a reverse access to the goods yard, but the real Hemyock, the starting point for Iain’s design did not. Iain's design added features from through stations on the Culm Valley line to arrive at his final Witheridge terminus design.

Understanding why some stations ended up with quite inconvenient track plans may result in more interesting operating sequences at exhibitions. Hence this question. Is Holywell Town unique, or one of a small but interesting minority?

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Tim V
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Re: Unusual goods yards at branch line termini

Postby Tim V » Fri Oct 24, 2008 8:20 pm

Yealmpton. But it was proposed that there was an extension, never built.
Camerton. That had an extension into the colliery. Then it became a through station.
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johnWM
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Re: Unusual goods yards at branch line termini

Postby johnWM » Mon Nov 03, 2008 9:58 pm

One of a small minority then, each one of the 3 for a different reason.

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Flymo748
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Re: Unusual goods yards at branch line termini

Postby Flymo748 » Thu Nov 13, 2008 9:52 pm

johnWM wrote:This thread is about an aspect of terminus design; a subject very relevant to anyone designing their own track plan rather than copying a particular prototype directly.
...
The only example of a prototype small terminus that I have come across that had reversed access to the goods yard was Holywell Town on the LNWR.
...
Does anyone know of any other small or even medium sized termini that have reversed access to the goods yard?


I didn't know of any examples at the time, but I've just been perusing the stack of railway books I currently have for contemplation in the smallest room...

There is an article in the Model Railway Constructor Annual 1984 entitled "Branch Terminii" by Peter Kazmierczak. This has a diagram showing yet another peculiar example of a reversed goods yard at a terminus. It's of Waterhouses, which apparently is a North Staffordshire Railway station. The reason for the reversal is that the goods yard creates an end-on junction to the narrow gauge Leek & Manifold Valley Light Railway.

I know absolutely nothing of the prototype, or its operation, but the suggestion is that the standard gauge wagons were loaded on the narrow gauge one in order to avoid transhipment of loads.

Perhaps someone else knows more?
Paul Willis
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David Knight
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Re: Unusual goods yards at branch line termini

Postby David Knight » Fri Nov 14, 2008 12:18 am

There is some Youtube video of the L&M which includes an example of the loading of a standard gauge wagon onto narrow gauge trucks.
[youtube]fjZgpqeMJA4&feature=related[/youtube]
[youtube]E_FxR7-0YD4&feature=related[/youtube]
Worth a look.

Cheers,

David Knight

Martin Nield
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Re: Unusual goods yards at branch line termini

Postby Martin Nield » Mon Dec 01, 2008 10:16 am

Another example is Stainland on the L&YR.


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