Modelling sheeted wagons

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Noel
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Re: Modelling sheeted wagons

Postby Noel » Sat Oct 09, 2021 5:02 pm

Thanks for posting the video. For generic sheets, with no lettering, it is indeed interesting. However, British railway sheets had previously varied a little in size between railways, but new ones were presumably a standard size from when they became common user in February 1917. Grouping era and BR sheets, for general use at least, were 21ft x 14ft 4ins. Larger sizes of wagons and loads might require a second sheet, but there were no larger sheets. I would think that the technique could be used with minimal modification to produce sheets of a fixed size, though whether it would be better that the traditional folded paper I don't know.

Winander wrote:Note that he doesn't letter them and fails to fold them according to purist beliefs, nor does he bother with fixing ropes.

Photographs show that sheets could be put on quite tidily, or very untidily, and every stage in between. Purist belief doesn't come into it - just modelling what you see rather than ignoring the reality. I don't put ropes [actually strings, sometimes referred to as ties; ropes were for securing loads] on either - far too fiddly and difficult to keep to scale, in my view.

Lettering is a different matter - BR sheets [ignoring those put on upside down] had markings as I posted earlier, which are usually visible in photographs, even if not legible. I don't find unlettered sheets to be at all realistic; The "BR" and numbers at least are usually fairly clear, even on sheets due for return to works for reproofing. Some photos suggest to me that the "BR" and sheet numbers may sometimes have been repainted even though the sheet had not been reproofed. Wagon sheets, incidentally, were very strictly controlled. Stations were expected to return spares or those for repair daily, for which a dedicated service of sheet trucks ran between major locations; if a station was short of sheets they could be ordered from the stores at 24 hours notice. Damaging them, or failing to report damage to them, were disciplinary matters.

Winander wrote:I wonder how strong they are?

Adequate, I would think, if they stayed on the wagon permanently, and probably even if they were removable, so long as it was done carefully.
Regards
Noel

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jim s-w
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Re: Modelling sheeted wagons

Postby jim s-w » Sun Oct 10, 2021 10:56 am

Noel wrote:
Lettering is a different matter - BR sheets [ignoring those put on upside down] had markings as I posted earlier, which are usually visible in photographs, even if not legible.


And yet in the examples I posted the strings are far more obvious than the lettering. Funny what we choose to be important isn’t it? ;)

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Noel
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Re: Modelling sheeted wagons

Postby Noel » Sun Oct 10, 2021 12:17 pm

jim s-w wrote:And yet in the examples I posted the strings are far more obvious than the lettering. Funny what we choose to be important isn’t it?


Different viewpoints, both literal and metaphorical, and also wagons in closeup, whereas with models a viewing distance of the proverbial "two feet" equates to a real life viewpoint around 150 feet away. In the literal sense, any higher viewpoint [very likely with models] and the "BR" and numbers will be unmissable. Rather like http://www.sutherland.davenportstation.org.uk/aaprint/dvn/dvn-59-11.jpg (there are two sheets on the nearest wagon) or http://www.sutherland.davenportstation.org.uk/aaprint/bib/bib-60-08.jpg (the one on the left is the only one I've found with the load roped over the sheet). Prototype for everything department, perhaps.
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Noel

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jim s-w
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Re: Modelling sheeted wagons

Postby jim s-w » Sun Oct 10, 2021 2:07 pm

There’s 2 sheeted wagons in that first image with no visible markings Noel.
Image
So you can say no markings did happen but no strings never did. ;)

I must say that the above image totally vindicates my thoughts on latex though as I feel the way it hangs is extremely similar to my own results so thanks for posting it.

Most models these days are viewed from a camera from a few inches away and very often larger than life. The 2 foot mindset might make sense at shows but even then people lean in for a closer look so it’s never really been true anyway. It’s just one of those things people say.

(Edited for clarity)
Last edited by jim s-w on Mon Oct 11, 2021 5:13 pm, edited 3 times in total.

Terry Bendall
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Re: Modelling sheeted wagons

Postby Terry Bendall » Sun Oct 10, 2021 5:53 pm

jim s-w wrote:The 2 foot mindset might make sense at shows but even then people lean in for a closer look so it’s never really been true anyway. It’s just one of those things people say.


And a camera at an exhibition will get in even closer, even if it one used by a visitor rather than any "official" exhibition photographer. :)

Terry Bendall

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Noel
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Re: Modelling sheeted wagons

Postby Noel » Mon Oct 11, 2021 1:55 pm

jim s-w wrote:There’s 2 sheeted wagons in that first image with no visible markings


P1000462A.JPG


P1000463A.JPG
Regards
Noel


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