Class 60/56 P4 conversion

sam_rhys_perry
Posts: 12
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2012 8:13 am

Class 60/56 P4 conversion

Postby sam_rhys_perry » Wed May 15, 2013 8:27 pm

I am looking into buying a few RTR conversion packs sold by Alan Gibson.
A few questions:

Will I need any tools to aid me in the conversion process? E.g. Wheel pullers

Are any washers needed to reduce slop? (and which ones?)

Is it likely that the conversion pack for a class 60 will also be suitable for a hornby class 56? (the new one)

And a question for the rest of the Alan Gibson catalogue; why are there two prices for all of their products? Can't seem to fathom it!

Cheers,
Sam

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martinm
Posts: 93
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 5:49 pm

Re: Class 60/56 P4 conversion

Postby martinm » Wed May 15, 2013 8:38 pm

sam_rhys_perry wrote:And a question for the rest of the Alan Gibson catalogue; why are there two prices for all of their products? Can't seem to fathom it!

Yes, I'd wondered the same, so I went back to the Terms of Trading:
To assist customers in ordering two prices are quoted in the price lists - the first price (in italics) is without VAT and
is for export orders to countries outside the EC. The second price (in bold) is for the UK and EC countries and is inclusive of the
current UK rate of VAT of 20%.

Terry Bendall
Posts: 1632
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2008 7:46 am

Re: Class 60/56 P4 conversion

Postby Terry Bendall » Thu May 16, 2013 6:54 am

I have done a couple of each of these models. The Class 60 has split axles and I used the AG conversion pack.

sam_rhys_perry wrote:Will I need any tools to aid me in the conversion process? E.g. Wheel pullers


I did not use a puller - because I don't have one. The wheels are on half axles that push into the gear. To remove the OO wheels hold each wheel in a pair of pliers and pull. One will come out of the gear. Then carefully hold the gear in your fingers and pull off the oither wheel.

sam_rhys_perry wrote:Are any washers needed to reduce slop? (and which ones?)


Not in my experience, but on other models I have. The wheel pack had a selection of washers of differet thiucknesses. These were anly used to set the guage. If I remember correctly the class 60 has stub axles that fit into bvearings in the side frames.

On the Hornby Class 56, which does not have stub axles I used Black Beetle wheels as sold by Branchlines which I nwhat i use on the majority diesels that I have converted - where they are suitable. The axle on the 56s that I have converted is in one piece. To remove the OO wheels I support one on the jaws of a vice and use a 1.5 mm diameter parallel pin punch (available from Eileen's Emporium) and a small hammer to remove the axle. To remove the gear I put a pair of pliers on top of the gear,rest the axle vertically on the bench and push dowwards. The pull off the gear with fingers. I use a 2mm long piece of 3mm dia stryene tube from Evergreen as a spacer between the wheel and the bearing to reduce the side play.

The December 2011 issue of Rail Express Magazine shows my process althugh this was with a Heljan Class 33.

Terry Bendall

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Simon_S
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Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2008 7:32 am

Re: Class 60/56 P4 conversion

Postby Simon_S » Thu May 16, 2013 9:24 am

You might find that, unless your track is absolutely flat, these rigid three axles bogies tend to rock on the centre axle causing derailments. A simple fix is to use slightly smaller wheels on the centre axles - Maygib wheels are said to be slightly larger diameter than Gibsons for the same nominal size, although measurements didn't bear this out for me. I'd recommend doing a Bo-Bo loco to avoid disappointment if it's your first conversion.

sam_rhys_perry
Posts: 12
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2012 8:13 am

Re: Class 60/56 P4 conversion

Postby sam_rhys_perry » Thu May 16, 2013 9:54 am

Thanks for the replies.

I will probably buy several types of wheels and see which setup works best. I have a class 20 waiting in line for conversion too so that can serve as backup if the co-cos go to tit.

Cheers,
Sam

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grovenor-2685
Posts: 3161
Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2008 8:02 pm

Re: Class 60/56 P4 conversion

Postby grovenor-2685 » Thu May 16, 2013 12:43 pm

For some clues, especially for the Bo-Bos you can look here. http://www.norgrove.me.uk/classes24-25-44.htm, http://www.norgrove.me.uk/class20.html I do show using a wheel puller since I have one, but its not an essential Terry's method works just as well. If the class 60 is similar to the 50 this may also help http://www.norgrove.me.uk/class50.htm but ignore the part about fixing the wheels as the AG stub axle conversion sets came out after I had done mine and make the job much simpler.
Keith

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John McAleely
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Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2008 5:08 pm

Re: Class 60/56 P4 conversion

Postby John McAleely » Thu May 16, 2013 1:16 pm

You can also find a thread on the class 20 here.

Terry Bendall
Posts: 1632
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2008 7:46 am

Re: Class 60/56 P4 conversion

Postby Terry Bendall » Fri May 17, 2013 6:12 am

Simon_S wrote:You might find that, unless your track is absolutely flat, these rigid three axles bogies tend to rock on the centre axle causing derailments.


I have found this with the Hornby class 50s and occasionally with the Bachmann class 37 (the later one with all three axles driven). Most locos however seem to be OK. Where it is a problem I usually scrape/file a small amount off the top of the bearing housings of the centre axle so that the bearings sit a little higher. It needs to be done carefully however. Once the wheels are fitted I usually put a steel rule across the treads to check that they are all level. Heljan class 47s are very easy in this respect since there is a lot of movement in the undriven centre axle. Some people of course don't like this particular model since the body is too wide.

sam_rhys_perry wrote:I will probably buy several types of wheels and see which setup works best.
ce the body is too wide.

It might be worth while only buying one type at a time since you may find that you are happy with one type of wheel and don't use the others. Generally the Ultrascale wheels, if they are available for your model, are reckoned to be the easist to use, although I never have used any. They are however expensive and you have to wait for delivery. Using the Branchlines carriage wheels is a very effective and cheaper alternative. I have only used the Gibson wheels on those models that need them - ie 31, 50 and 60.

Terry Bendall


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