Best option for a Terrier

garethashenden
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Joined: Tue Apr 07, 2015 9:41 pm

Best option for a Terrier

Postby garethashenden » Thu Feb 15, 2018 6:51 pm

I'm interested in adding a Terrier to my locomotive roster and I'd like recommendations on the best way to achieve it. I don't actually know all that much about them, or their modifications. Whatever I end up with would need to be c.1903, so I think that's improved engine green.

So far I have found that there are a couple of chassis kits for the Hornby model, Branchlines and Comet. Is one notably better than the other? Also, how accurate is the livery on the Hornby model? Is it correct or has it been simplified. Are there any full kits available? I'm not opposed to using a RTR body, just looking for all options.

Thanks for you help,
Gareth

shipbadger
Posts: 117
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 3:00 pm

Re: Best option for a Terrier

Postby shipbadger » Thu Feb 15, 2018 7:47 pm

Gareth
I did one years ago after buying a Dapol, as it was then, body. I used a Branchlines chassis but modified for split axle pick up. Whatever you do you will need to research your intended loco very thoroughly as there are innumerable variations. I chose an ex-Isle of Wight loco so had to alter the bunker but there are many, many differences. Starting at the front you'll discover that the buffers can be of two heights as some locos had their's raised to better match the coaching stock. Whichever chassis you use you'll end up with a characterfull little loco. Mine icidentally used a small Mashima (12x?) motor and a Branchlines Multibox but you may need to source a different motor now and I'd look at the High Level gearboxes as well. It also runs on Sharman wheels so that really dates it.

Tony Comber

Philip Hall
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Re: Best option for a Terrier

Postby Philip Hall » Thu Feb 15, 2018 8:48 pm

GW Models (who make the well known quartering jig) at one time produced a nickel silver kit for a Terrier, with parts like the roof pressed to shape. The various components were not etched but cut and filed to shape around hardened steel patterns. It was also notable for having working wooden shoe brake gear! It is just possible you might find one of these on a second hand stall, but be aware it was for a particular variety of Terrier (an early one judging by the brake gear) and also that it was designed when motors were big and it drove, very visibly, on the front axle.

I do think that the Dapol/Hornby or whoever owns it now version is a reasonable, easily obtainable, way to go with the reservations already noted. It looked pretty good but was always a ‘bitza’...

Philip

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steve howe
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Re: Best option for a Terrier

Postby steve howe » Thu Feb 15, 2018 9:27 pm

How well does it run? Alan Gibson does a conversion set for it. I bought one second hand at a show in GWR shirtbutton livery, but have not had chance to run it yet.

Steve

Paulhb
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Re: Best option for a Terrier

Postby Paulhb » Thu Feb 15, 2018 9:36 pm

The Hornby Terrier is sort of mixed up A1 and A1X, a bit of both but not accurate for either!

The Branchline chassis builds up well. Many years ago I put one under a Hornby WC&P Terrier body and more recently have altered one to go under a Highland Railway Lochgorm tank.

There is a etched kit produced by Albion Models and sold by Roxey Mouldings at shows although I can’t find any reference on Roxey’s web site.

Regards

Paul

myoxall
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Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2017 9:20 pm

Re: Best option for a Terrier

Postby myoxall » Thu Feb 15, 2018 10:06 pm

I recently purchased the Albion Terrier Kit via Roxey Mouldings. It looks very good with good instructions. It has been added to my stash of kits to do once I eventually finish my Stroudley E1. Give Roxey a call I found him to be immensely helpful and received the Terrier Kit in a very short time.

Martin

Philip Hall
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Re: Best option for a Terrier

Postby Philip Hall » Fri Feb 16, 2018 12:19 am

As far as I can recall the RTR model is far too high off the ground; a result of the motor being mounted high up. I have seen one or two conversions and to me they just look wrong. No amount of concerted hacking can change the height thing so a better option is a new chassis of one kind or another.

Philip

David Knight
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Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 6:02 pm

Re: Best option for a Terrier

Postby David Knight » Fri Feb 16, 2018 12:25 am

Tim Shackleton's book Plastic Bodied Locos has a chapter on converting the Dapol/Hornby body to an A1 in P4. He uses the Branchlines chassis. His particular prototype was the Edge Hill Light Railway number 2. I used the article as a basic guide but chose to "purchase" my Terrier from the LSWR as I was not happy with the available options for Salter valves at the time.

Maggie.jpg


HTH

David

garethashenden
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Re: Best option for a Terrier

Postby garethashenden » Fri Feb 16, 2018 6:09 am

Paulhb wrote:The Hornby Terrier is sort of mixed up A1 and A1X, a bit of both but not accurate for either!


Philip Hall wrote:As far as I can recall the RTR model is far too high off the ground; a result of the motor being mounted high up. I have seen one or two conversions and to me they just look wrong. No amount of concerted hacking can change the height thing so a better option is a new chassis of one kind or another.

Philip


This is what I was wondering about, thank you. I think I had remembered something to the affect that the body is a little "off" in places.

Paulhb wrote:There is a etched kit produced by Albion Models and sold by Roxey Mouldings at shows although I can’t find any reference on Roxey’s web site.


myoxall wrote:I recently purchased the Albion Terrier Kit via Roxey Mouldings. It looks very good with good instructions. It has been added to my stash of kits to do once I eventually finish my Stroudley E1. Give Roxey a call I found him to be immensely helpful and received the Terrier Kit in a very short time.

Martin


I shall investigate! I do like etched kits, there's something very pleasing about them.

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pete_mcfarlane
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Re: Best option for a Terrier

Postby pete_mcfarlane » Fri Feb 16, 2018 1:30 pm

The biggest problem with the Hornby body seems to be the combined front splashers and sandboxes. The A1X conversions (or at least the ones the Brighton did themselves) lost these sandboxes. This limits your options for SR and BR condition locos.

Andrew Ullyott
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Re: Best option for a Terrier

Postby Andrew Ullyott » Fri Feb 16, 2018 8:00 pm

Having built two Terriers for my WC&P layouts, I can echo the comments above. Be careful of your prototype as the front and back ends don't really match on the Hornby model. I replaced the splashers on the front axle with custom built ones (one Terrier I did in plasticard and one in brass) as I was modelling the A1X and watch the boiler extensions.
I used Branchlines chassis on both occasions and in both instances they were absolute pigs to get to run. More so than any other kit I've ever built. It may be a coincidence or it may have been me but I've always viewed the chassis kits with a degree of mistrust. I remember also trying to make a Perseverence chassis kit for the first terrier and that came to a very grisly end one Sunday afternoon at the had of 'Mr Tin Snips'. Ok so cutting it into many, many pieces wasn't terribly mature but it meant that the kit wouldn't hurt me any further! So maybe it was me after all.
Both Terriers have Mashima 12 series motors (1220 I think) through High Level 108:1 gearboxes and wheels were Gibson. Both have run for a number of years now without any further drama.


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