Soldering

User avatar
John Donnelly
Posts: 653
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 7:03 pm

Soldering

Postby John Donnelly » Mon Feb 15, 2016 9:03 pm

Now I appreciate that this will be child's play for most of you but I took another step on the road to fine scale nirvana today by successfully managing to solder 3 pieces of brass together which, as an added bonus, hasn't fallen apart.

Image

It needs some cleanup but I reckon it is pretty neat for a first go but it has raised some questions...

I'm using 145 degree solder with Carrs green flux and the soldering iron set to 380 degrees. Whilst I was soldering I noticed that, whilst moving it, that the bit would get stuck and 'drag' in the solder so I wonder if I am right in assuming the following:

1. At the moment the bit I have has a pointed end, I assume that a bit with a flattened end might be better for getting heat in to the brass?
2. The two larger bits of brass were .6 and .8mm thick respectively and I guess that the dragging would be caused by the brass not being hot enough?

John

User avatar
Andy W
Posts: 819
Joined: Thu May 21, 2009 8:11 am

Re: Soldering

Postby Andy W » Mon Feb 15, 2016 9:05 pm

I'm sure both assumptions are correct.
Make Worcestershire great again.
Build a wall along the Herefordshire border and make them pay for it.

User avatar
Tim V
Posts: 2243
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 4:40 pm

Re: Soldering

Postby Tim V » Mon Feb 15, 2016 9:16 pm

Yes, the iron hasn't got enough thermal mass, so the joint is cooling too quickly. Replace with a bigger tip. What iron are you using?
Tim V
Scalefour News Editor

User avatar
Will L
Posts: 1654
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 3:54 pm

Re: Soldering

Postby Will L » Mon Feb 15, 2016 9:20 pm

Your trying to solder together some fairly chunky bits of brass here. The dragging effect is cased by the brass draining the heat from the bit faster than the iron can replace it. A pointed bit is really only suited for soldering relativity small joints and electrical work, and you will need a big chunky flat ended bits for lumps of metal that size, but that said I would recommend you start learning the craft with small joints and only move on to the big chunky stuff when you've seen how it all works in more favourable circumstance. As a rule thumb, the biger the bits of metal you are trying to join, the bigger the bit you need.

User avatar
John Donnelly
Posts: 653
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 7:03 pm

Re: Soldering

Postby John Donnelly » Mon Feb 15, 2016 9:24 pm

The iron is from Maplins and a quick check suggests that the bit may not be changeable...

John

User avatar
John Donnelly
Posts: 653
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 7:03 pm

Re: Soldering

Postby John Donnelly » Mon Feb 15, 2016 9:26 pm

Thanks to you all, at least I know my assumptions were correct. For now, I suspect this bit will do the job and should be sufficient for my first chassis, a set of Penbits sprung bogies.

John

User avatar
David B
Posts: 1108
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 5:30 pm

Re: Soldering

Postby David B » Mon Feb 15, 2016 9:32 pm

What wattage is your iron? A greater wattage (min 50W) will replace more quickly the heat drawn away by the brass.

380°C is plenty hot enough for 145° solder. It is more heat you need which should be supplied with a bit that has a greater area - I would suggest at least 3mm. Don't confuse more heat (supplied with a larger surface area of bit) with a higher temperature.
Last edited by John McAleely on Mon Feb 15, 2016 9:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
John Donnelly
Posts: 653
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 7:03 pm

Re: Soldering

Postby John Donnelly » Mon Feb 15, 2016 9:36 pm

It's a 48W iron.

John

User avatar
Flymo748
Posts: 2178
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 6:00 pm

Re: Soldering

Postby Flymo748 » Mon Feb 15, 2016 10:01 pm

John Donnelly wrote:It's a 48W iron.

John


Hi John,

It looks pretty much that you're on the right road. I'd agree with others that your iron is being out-punched by the mass of the brass in your first test piece.

But as you say, for a bogie kit you should be just fine. Keep with it, and do report back here...

Cheers
Flymo
Beware of Trains - occasional modelling in progress!
www.5522models.co.uk

User avatar
John Donnelly
Posts: 653
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 7:03 pm

Re: Soldering

Postby John Donnelly » Mon Feb 15, 2016 10:43 pm

Flymo748 wrote: Keep with it, and do report back here...


Will do, a bit more practice first though, no point having a sprung bogie that's bunged up with solder...

John

User avatar
Andy W
Posts: 819
Joined: Thu May 21, 2009 8:11 am

Re: Soldering

Postby Andy W » Tue Feb 16, 2016 8:53 am

Scrap etch is perfect to practice on.
Make Worcestershire great again.
Build a wall along the Herefordshire border and make them pay for it.

User avatar
John Donnelly
Posts: 653
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 7:03 pm

Re: Soldering

Postby John Donnelly » Tue Feb 16, 2016 8:31 pm

Well, having practiced a bit more on some thinner etch, I've decided that you learn best by doing so I'm going to crack on with the Penbits 24 bogies, what could possibly go wrong... :D

John

User avatar
Andy W
Posts: 819
Joined: Thu May 21, 2009 8:11 am

Re: Soldering

Postby Andy W » Tue Feb 16, 2016 8:34 pm

Nothing can go wrong! It's fun! Even if you make a mistake you learn and move on! Brilliant!
Make Worcestershire great again.
Build a wall along the Herefordshire border and make them pay for it.

User avatar
John Donnelly
Posts: 653
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 7:03 pm

Re: Soldering

Postby John Donnelly » Tue Feb 16, 2016 9:31 pm

Andy W wrote:Nothing can go wrong! It's fun! Even if you make a mistake you learn and move on! Brilliant!


Cheers Andy and thanks to all who took the time to reply, for anyone interested in the ruminations and tribulations of a complete novice, I've made a start here:

viewtopic.php?f=122&t=4720

John


Return to “Other Workshop Practice”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests