Removing superglue

User avatar
jon price
Posts: 473
Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2010 2:34 pm

Removing superglue

Postby jon price » Mon Mar 16, 2015 9:42 pm

I have an etched brass kit that was stuck with superglue. Is there any way of easily removing it/dismantling it?

dclift
Posts: 53
Joined: Sun Jul 26, 2009 1:35 pm

Re: Removing superglue

Postby dclift » Mon Mar 16, 2015 10:03 pm

Acetone will dissolve most species of superglue but it will also dissolve most species of paint.
David Clift.

User avatar
Will L
Posts: 1650
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 3:54 pm

Re: Removing superglue

Postby Will L » Mon Mar 16, 2015 10:06 pm

Super glue can be a bit brittle particularly if the joint isn't all that close, so a sharp tap will often shift big lumps of brass which wont bend, and chunky white metal casting. Failing that super glue joints give up at about 150 degrees C. So as long as it is all brass try attaching it with a hot soldering iron. You want to keep eyes and nose out of the ensuing fumes.

User avatar
jon price
Posts: 473
Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2010 2:34 pm

Re: Removing superglue

Postby jon price » Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:07 am

Thanks, these should get me started

Alan Turner
Posts: 545
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 4:24 pm

Re: Removing superglue

Postby Alan Turner » Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:12 am

Ordinary superglue is not waterproof, so to remove simply soak in warm water which has had a little washing-up liquid added to aid penetration.

regards

Alan

User avatar
Will L
Posts: 1650
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 3:54 pm

Re: Removing superglue

Postby Will L » Tue Mar 17, 2015 5:43 pm

Alan Turner wrote:Ordinary superglue is not waterproof, so to remove simply soak in warm water which has had a little washing-up liquid added to aid penetration.


Not convinced, at least one cup in our household has a handle handle repaired with super glue which has proved dishwasher proof.

Will

Alan Turner
Posts: 545
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 4:24 pm

Re: Removing superglue

Postby Alan Turner » Thu Mar 19, 2015 10:50 am

Will L wrote:
Alan Turner wrote:Ordinary superglue is not waterproof, so to remove simply soak in warm water which has had a little washing-up liquid added to aid penetration.


Not convinced, at least one cup in our household has a handle handle repaired with super glue which has proved dishwasher proof.

Will


I quote from the Loctite data sheet ".......Cured adhesive may be cut away with caution
using a sharp blade, removed with acetone or with boiling water."

regards

Alan

User avatar
Will L
Posts: 1650
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 3:54 pm

Re: Removing superglue

Postby Will L » Thu Mar 19, 2015 7:28 pm

Alan Turner wrote:
Will L wrote:
Alan Turner wrote:Ordinary superglue is not waterproof, so to remove simply soak in warm water which has had a little washing-up liquid added to aid penetration.


Not convinced, at least one cup in our household has a handle handle repaired with super glue which has proved dishwasher proof.

Will


I quote from the Loctite data sheet ".......Cured adhesive may be cut away with caution
using a sharp blade, removed with acetone or with boiling water."


1. Note the difference between hot water and boiling water. Its waterproof but not heat proof. According to that data sheet it degrades above 82 degrees. Lower than I remembered but still dishwasher proof.
2. Also note that this advice is more to do with removing it from a surface, by implication an open surface. Glue nicely sandwiched between two chunks of etched brass does not present much of an edge for acetone /hot water to act on, and the metal will do a good job conduction heat away. That said fully dunking in freshly boiled water may do the trick. Or it's back to the soldering iron.

User avatar
jon price
Posts: 473
Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2010 2:34 pm

Re: Removing superglue

Postby jon price » Thu Mar 19, 2015 10:09 pm

Will's comments on glued brass sheets are in line with my experience. I removed the small glues parts using heat, and cleaned up using acetone and vigorous scrubbing, but the etched sheets glued edge on have survived nearby soldering (including soldering a cast brass dome, so quite hot), and scrubbing with CIF and hot water during flux removal, so I'm leaving them alone as they seem to be pretty durable


Return to “Other Workshop Practice”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest