Home made paint shaker

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David B
Posts: 1185
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 5:30 pm

Home made paint shaker

Postby David B » Mon Dec 08, 2014 9:34 am

If you are feeling brave, try this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMmMls-GYOI

jayell

Re: Home made paint shaker

Postby jayell » Mon Dec 08, 2014 11:46 am

hardly a $5 paint shaker if you don't already have a jig-saw ;)

John Lewis

David Bigcheeseplant
Posts: 301
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 9:10 pm

Re: Home made paint shaker

Postby David Bigcheeseplant » Mon Dec 08, 2014 4:14 pm

I use a Ikea coffee frother which is £1 plus batteries

dal-t
Posts: 635
Joined: Mon Jan 11, 2010 8:06 pm

Re: Home made paint shaker

Postby dal-t » Mon Dec 08, 2014 4:35 pm

Oh, those bottles of Testors - thick sludge at the bottom, evil liquid above it, glass bottle thicker than an armoured periscope, and a tin lid that wouldn't budge if you dropped a depthcharge on it. Wonder why I don't miss them? Still using that yellow screwdriver, though - to open tins of Humbrol.
David L-T

martin goodall
Posts: 1043
Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 6:20 pm

Re: Home made paint shaker

Postby martin goodall » Mon Dec 08, 2014 4:50 pm

For a really expensive paint-stirrer, I can recommend the vertical milling/drilling attachment of a Unimat 3.

The bent wire 'paddle' is held in the Jacobs' drill chuck.

At last I've found a use for my lathe!

Alan Turner
Posts: 559
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 4:24 pm

Re: Home made paint shaker

Postby Alan Turner » Mon Dec 08, 2014 5:26 pm

Go to an art shop and buy a Derwent electric eraser for about £5. (http://www.hobbycraft.co.uk/derwent-bat ... tAodYhYA3g)

Stick a suitable bent wire into the end of the eraser. Put into paint pot and switch on.

Suggest you fashion a lid with a hole in it or otherwise you will have a nice line of paint across you and probably the room.

If you want to use it for its intended use later simply insert a new eraser tip.

regards

Alan

Philip Hall
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Joined: Mon Aug 10, 2009 7:49 pm

Re: Home made paint shaker

Postby Philip Hall » Mon Dec 08, 2014 6:11 pm

I use a bent piece of wire in the mini drill, which is fed from an old H&M controller. That way I can adjust the speed so as to control the amount of paint I want to fling over the bench.

Philip

David Knight
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Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 6:02 pm

Re: Home made paint shaker

Postby David Knight » Mon Dec 08, 2014 6:21 pm

I use a 'tamed' Ikea Coffee frother. Mine has been cut back to a small 'L' shape as the full fitting will froth rather than stir the paint. As an added precaution I set the paint inside an empty toilet roll tube just in case there is any spray from the stirrer.

Cheers,

David

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Will L
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Re: Home made paint shaker

Postby Will L » Mon Dec 08, 2014 10:26 pm

Philip Hall wrote:I use a bent piece of wire in the mini drill, which is fed from an old H&M controller. That way I can adjust the speed so as to control the amount of paint I want to fling over the bench.


That's what I do to, assuming you have the mini drill total cost one bit of wire. The wire is shaped thus
paint wire.jpg
paint wire.jpg (17.21 KiB) Viewed 5850 times

Paint will stay in the tin so long as the bent bit stays below the surface while spinning.
Since I required my Dremel, my low voltage drills is used for nothing else.

Brinkly
Posts: 188
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2008 12:13 pm

Re: Home made paint shaker

Postby Brinkly » Tue Dec 09, 2014 7:07 pm

Well we are now ready to do some painting!

I've almost seen it all now!

Regards,

Nick.

martin goodall
Posts: 1043
Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 6:20 pm

Re: Home made paint shaker

Postby martin goodall » Tue Dec 09, 2014 7:50 pm

Philip Hall wrote:I use a bent piece of wire in the mini drill, which is fed from an old H&M controller. That way I can adjust the speed so as to control the amount of paint I want to fling over the bench.

Philip


Yes, I forgot to say that when stirring paint under power (with a wire 'paddle' as shown in one of the other posts above), it is necessary to hold some paper round the top of the tin, as some paint will inevitably be spun out of the top of the tin, making a neat horizontal line on your pullover, on any nearby wall and on anything else in the line of fire.

DougN
Posts: 978
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 9:57 am

Re: Home made paint shaker

Postby DougN » Tue Dec 09, 2014 9:54 pm

Why do I think that comment is wise words of experience, Martin.

I can remember years ago trying to paint a A4 in blue with Precision paint and having massive trouble as it needed serious mixing... to the point of a 12V drill being used and finally mixing properly... it was by brush so was not really the best. I have the loco around some where I should pull it out and have a look at what I did as a teenager! :shock:
Doug
Still not doing enough modelling

allanferguson
Posts: 361
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 6:27 pm

Re: Home made paint shaker

Postby allanferguson » Tue Dec 09, 2014 10:35 pm

Like Phillip, I use a bent piece of wire (actually a bent nail) and I hold the tin at the bottom of a 2 litre ice cream box. I still get the horizontal line, but it's inside the ice cream tub. If I'm worried about paint on my hands I wear plastic gloves. The drill I use is a very old, small, 12v job, which I can stop by gripping the chuck.

Allan F

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Martin Wynne
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Re: Home made paint shaker

Postby Martin Wynne » Wed Dec 10, 2014 7:03 am

Try putting a small ball-bearing (or several) in the tin/bottle. Then an ordinary shake by hand is much more effective, and no mess. Same principle as the rattle-can aerosols.

In the olden days we used to put Humbrol tinlets inside the car hubcaps for a few days. Or only 5 minutes if you have a nice bumpy road.

If the lid is on really tight you can put them in the washing machine with the next wash. Image

Martin.
40 years developing Templot. And counting ...

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David B
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Re: Home made paint shaker

Postby David B » Wed Dec 10, 2014 8:51 am

I have heard it said that over-vigorous agitation of some makes of paint can cause them to appear emulsified. Anyone had this happen with any make or do you not agitate your paint excessively?


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