Etch Primer

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John Bateson
Posts: 672
Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2008 6:39 pm

Etch Primer

Postby John Bateson » Tue Oct 28, 2014 2:58 pm

With the current regulations on 'dangerous' spray cans, and with Phoenix seeming to have stopped their self etch spray, is there any recommendation from within the group as to the current solution?
I am reluctant to risk gumming up one of my spray guns by using the mixing option.
John
Slaving away still on GCR stuff ...
Avoiding the soaps ...
http://www.greatcentralmodels.co.uk

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Jol Wilkinson
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Joined: Mon Jul 21, 2008 7:39 pm

Re: Etch Primer

Postby Jol Wilkinson » Tue Oct 28, 2014 5:57 pm

John,

I have used two part etch primers, Comet and PPP, without problems. Just clean out your airbrush immediately. I strip down the airbrush and use cellulose thinner to clean it (ebay, Amazon, Halfords or your local car paint supplier).

You can also buy aerosol cans of etch primer, but these are sold for car/bike repairs and may be a bit heavy for modelling purposes.

Jol

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Mike Garwood
Posts: 510
Joined: Sun Aug 03, 2008 4:51 pm

Re: Etch Primer

Postby Mike Garwood » Tue Oct 28, 2014 6:09 pm

John

http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stor ... &langId=-1

Upol 8 acid etch primer.

Used it on my last series of coaches and engines, worked well with cellulose. I don't have any experience of it with enamels.

Mike

DougN
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Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 9:57 am

Re: Etch Primer

Postby DougN » Tue Oct 28, 2014 11:43 pm

Jol,

I have found that the etch primer is quite thin. The trick I have been using is to heat the can gently... by either placing the can on the ducted heating vent or in direct sun for about 30 minutes (on hot days here in Melbourne (40degrees) sitting outside in the shade is enough! This increases the pressure in the can! So that the paint is atomised properly. Usual painting rules apply...must be close to the model so that the paint does dry before hitting the model etc!
Doug
Still not doing enough modelling

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Mark Tatlow
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Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 11:24 pm

Re: Etch Primer

Postby Mark Tatlow » Wed Oct 29, 2014 10:46 pm

John

Try Closterman for etch primers - http://www.clostermanncoatings.co.uk/pr ... osols.html

They come in five colours; grey, black, white, beige and clear. This is great for things like chassis (black) and signals (white). If someone knows of an equivilent etch primer in red/red oxide I would be keen to hear.
Mark Tatlow

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Jol Wilkinson
Posts: 777
Joined: Mon Jul 21, 2008 7:39 pm

Re: Etch Primer

Postby Jol Wilkinson » Thu Oct 30, 2014 8:08 am

I had a telephone chat with David Stapleton (father of Phoenix Precision) yesterday and mentioned this topic. He said that the self etch primer is still available as an aerosol. I've since had a look at their website and it does appear, although it isn't too easy to find:

http://www.phoenix-paints.co.uk/precisi ... mer-1.html

then look under the Paint size "choose an option" box.

I have also used the Closterman black etch primer on chassis, but still prefer to airbrush a two pack primer if possible on loco and carriage bodies. It is easier to control paint thickness and coverage in those hard to reach places.

Jol

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jayell
Posts: 500
Joined: Tue May 07, 2013 8:20 am

Re: Etch Primer

Postby jayell » Thu Oct 30, 2014 8:23 am

the Phoenix single pack etch page has this warning

"Please be aware that all of our single pack etch primer products carry a best before (BBE) date next to the batch number. To ensure that you have fresh material we recommend that you only buy single pack etch primer products immediately prior to use."

So it isn't something that can be kept on the shelf for use when needed

John

martin goodall
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 6:20 pm

Re: Etch Primer

Postby martin goodall » Thu Oct 30, 2014 11:57 am

DougN wrote:Jol,

I have found that the etch primer is quite thin. The trick I have been using is to heat the can gently... by either placing the can on the ducted heating vent or in direct sun for about 30 minutes (on hot days here in Melbourne (40degrees) sitting outside in the shade is enough! This increases the pressure in the can! So that the paint is atomised properly. Usual painting rules apply...must be close to the model so that the paint does dry before hitting the model etc!



Like many people, I am generally sceptical of "Elfen Safety" scares, but I am aware of warnings about heating up spray cans, or even allowing them to get too warm (e.g. leaving them in the sunlight).

I was once shown photos of the spectacular results when a lady had left a can of hair spray on her dressing table, where it was caught by the sun. To say that the results were explosive is an understatement. It actually blew the walls of the room apart and lifted the ceiling. Fortunately, no-one was in the room at the time - they are unlikely to have survived if they had been.

DougN
Posts: 880
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 9:57 am

Re: Etch Primer

Postby DougN » Fri Oct 31, 2014 5:38 am

John, I am not advocating that this is the way they are kept. I would only suggest this for the 20 minutes before the physical exercise of shaking the can. My usual is it should feel Warm to the touch. IE less than 45degrees surface temperature. Too hot and you can't hold the can comfortably to spray the item. Like you if it is getting too hot. Can't comfortably handle the can let it cool down until you can.

The temperature I find works well is when you shake the can you don't get a cold feeling through your hand. (so that will mean the contents are about 38 degrees or body temperature.
Doug
Still not doing enough modelling


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