Are 'weathering powders' sold as 'pigments'

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John McAleely
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Are 'weathering powders' sold as 'pigments'

Postby John McAleely » Sat Mar 02, 2013 8:37 pm

I'm trying to stock up for some painting & weathering. Various model railway places recommend using 'weathering powders', and I've seen specific recommendations to use 'MIG Weathering Powders'.

Looking at what I assume is the right website (http://migproductions.com), I can't find any mention of a weathering powder. Googling around, I think that 'pigments' may be what is being referred to. Can anyone confirm?

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John Donnelly
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Re: Are 'weathering powders' sold as 'pigments'

Postby John Donnelly » Sat Mar 02, 2013 8:42 pm

Yes, they are one and the same, I've used then for a few years on my military models.

John

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John McAleely
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Re: Are 'weathering powders' sold as 'pigments'

Postby John McAleely » Sun Mar 03, 2013 2:39 pm

Thanks! I've ordered some to have a play with. BR in the 1970's should give me lots of reasons to use them...

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John Donnelly
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Re: Are 'weathering powders' sold as 'pigments'

Postby John Donnelly » Sun Mar 03, 2013 8:11 pm

Whatever you do make sure you never spill them on the carpet, you'll never get them out :shock:

John

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Flymo748
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Re: Are 'weathering powders' sold as 'pigments'

Postby Flymo748 » Sun Mar 03, 2013 9:50 pm

John McAleely wrote:I'm trying to stock up for some painting & weathering. Various model railway places recommend using 'weathering powders', and I've seen specific recommendations to use 'MIG Weathering Powders'.

Looking at what I assume is the right website (http://migproductions.com), I can't find any mention of a weathering powder. Googling around, I think that 'pigments' may be what is being referred to. Can anyone confirm?


Hi John,

I've a selection of the Carrs weathering powders.

I'll pop them in with my stuff for Missenden, and you can have a play over the weekend if you like. Bring along something to get messy!

Cheers
Flymo
Beware of Trains - occasional modelling in progress!
www.5522models.co.uk

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Wizard of the Moor
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Re: Are 'weathering powders' sold as 'pigments'

Postby Wizard of the Moor » Mon Mar 04, 2013 8:36 am

Mig powders are milled much more finely than Carrs. This means that they will 'stick' to any matt surface.

Carrs, on the other hand, need a lot more work to scrub them onto a similar surface. They also have the habit of containing clumps of a different colour, which explodes all over your work unexpectedly. This can either have an interesting random effect, or give you exactly the opposite of what you are trying to do.

Once you get used to the Mig powders then you an achieve some very subtle effects. However, use tiny quantities (or practise on an old model) at first.

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Flymo748
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Re: Are 'weathering powders' sold as 'pigments'

Postby Flymo748 » Mon Mar 04, 2013 7:29 pm

Wizard of the Moor wrote:Mig powders are milled much more finely than Carrs. This means that they will 'stick' to any matt surface.

Carrs, on the other hand, need a lot more work to scrub them onto a similar surface. They also have the habit of containing clumps of a different colour, which explodes all over your work unexpectedly. This can either have an interesting random effect, or give you exactly the opposite of what you are trying to do.


Oooh.... Thanks for the insight James!

I haven't played at all with these Carrs powders. They've sat in my modelling kit for years and years, and I always reach for the enamels, or more lately the Games Workshop washes whenI'm doing weathering.

I have kept them out of the desire to never condemn something without trying it, so perhaps I'll have a play with them at Missenden and decide one way or the other. You don't fill me with confidence, but that's better to be fore-warned.

Cheers
Flymo
Beware of Trains - occasional modelling in progress!
www.5522models.co.uk

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John McAleely
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Re: Are 'weathering powders' sold as 'pigments'

Postby John McAleely » Mon Mar 04, 2013 7:40 pm

Flymo748 wrote:
Wizard of the Moor wrote:Mig powders are milled much more finely than Carrs


Oooh.... Thanks for the insight James!

I haven't played at all with these Carrs powders. They've sat in my modelling kit for years and years, and I always reach for the enamels, or more lately the Games Workshop washes whenI'm doing weathering.



I guess you can try mine out at missenden! If the websites involved are emailing me status correctly, I should have some mig powders tomorrow, and I plan to bring them with me :-)

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David B
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Re: Are 'weathering powders' sold as 'pigments'

Postby David B » Mon Mar 04, 2013 8:16 pm

I have some Mig powders which I will bring along to Missenden. I have also been bequeathed some Langley ones, so comparisons can be made.

There is a model shop in Exeter, Isca Models, which has now got an extensive range of paints, both acrylic and enamel as well as weathering powders. I was interested to see the other day that Humbrol have now got in on the weathering act. Anyone used them? I might get a pot for the weekend (Makes a change from the other things one was asked about at the barbers!).

See you chaps on Friday at Missenden.

David

Philip Hall
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Re: Are 'weathering powders' sold as 'pigments'

Postby Philip Hall » Mon Mar 04, 2013 8:38 pm

I saw Pete Waterman using the Humbrol ones at Warley; he had achieved some very nice results, and reckoned they were superior to the Mig ones. They can also be mixed with a fluid to create a wash - I think it's 'Decalfix' but the pots don't actually tell you. I was in my local model shop the other day (yes, we still have one), picked up a few of them and hopefully will have the chance to make a direct comparison soon.

Philip


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