Alpha Mill

Outside the fence.
ralphrobertson
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Nov 27, 2013 3:57 pm

Re: Alpha Mill

Postby ralphrobertson » Mon Nov 26, 2018 5:17 pm

I will use that design for the factory gates thanks Howard. It is too late now for what I have already done. Don't fancy drawing it up though!

Ralph

Dave Holt
Posts: 20
Joined: Thu May 28, 2009 9:44 pm

Re: Alpha Mill

Postby Dave Holt » Mon Nov 26, 2018 5:51 pm

The Warwick (and other George Stotts mills of this style) was built in 1907 - somewhat earlier than the Art Nouveau movement, if I understand correctly.
Dave.

JFS
Posts: 618
Joined: Wed Dec 16, 2009 3:47 pm

Re: Alpha Mill

Postby JFS » Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:23 am

ralphrobertson wrote:I will use that design for the factory gates ...
Don't fancy drawing it up though!

More easily done in a drawing package than a CAD package perhaps?

Best Wishes,

User avatar
Le Corbusier
Posts: 1130
Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2015 3:39 pm

Re: Alpha Mill

Postby Le Corbusier » Tue Nov 27, 2018 8:42 am

Dave Holt wrote:The Warwick (and other George Stotts mills of this style) was built in 1907 - somewhat earlier than the Art Nouveau movement, if I understand correctly.
Dave.

A simplified summing up might be ... Art Nouveau spans roughly from 1890 through to the first world war ... 'fin de siecle' is a term often used alongside it.
Art Nouveau arguably revolves around the artists and designers based in France and Belgium during this period, - though is often also used generically as a continental catch all .... where Sessionist art and design with its focus in Vienna (which had links to Mackintosh and the Glasgow school) is also included - think Olbrich, Wagner and Klimt as examples.

Many countries had there own versions of 'fin de siecle' - Gaudi in Spain springs to mind or Saarinen in Finland.

The 'arts and crafts' predated all and arguably led the way ...starting with Morris and the pre-raphaelites and broadening into the Edwardian freestyle with a collective hub at the 'art workers guild'.

A fascinating subject. :thumb
Tim Lee

martin goodall
Posts: 896
Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 6:20 pm

Re: Alpha Mill

Postby martin goodall » Tue Nov 27, 2018 11:49 am

I would suggest that it is not easy to pin labels on the work of individual architects.

Take for example, the work of Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Art Nouveau? Perhaps, and yet there are Japanese influences in his work. There were also Arts & Crafts influences in his work. And then there is also the element of Modernism. There were also the intriguing cross-influences between the work of Mackintosh and Charles Holden. Compare Holden's Central Library in Bristol with the extension to Mackintosh's Glasgow School of Art (now irretrievably lost, I fear). The similarities are striking.

So whatever influences may be detected in the decorative ironwork mentioned earlier, I would hesitate to pin a label on it.

User avatar
Le Corbusier
Posts: 1130
Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2015 3:39 pm

Re: Alpha Mill

Postby Le Corbusier » Tue Nov 27, 2018 11:58 am

martin goodall wrote:So whatever influences may be detected in the decorative ironwork mentioned earlier, I would hesitate to pin a label on it.

True ;) though until you have read widely around the subject they can be helpful pegs to hang on to. ... endless are the arguments of academic categorisation. :thumb

..and of course there is always someone who knows more about the subject ... or an area of the subject than you.
Tim Lee

bevis
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2008 6:58 pm

Re: Alpha Mill

Postby bevis » Tue Nov 27, 2018 5:31 pm

Knowing next to nothing about this subject but having been watching this thread, looking forward to seeing t' mill on Saturday and an interest in Arts and Crafts I wandered onto the Art Workers' guild site and found a W Stott as an Honorary Brother in 1893.
http://www.artworkersguild.org/media/22 ... nt-day.pdf
Bevis

User avatar
Le Corbusier
Posts: 1130
Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2015 3:39 pm

Re: Alpha Mill

Postby Le Corbusier » Tue Nov 27, 2018 5:52 pm

bevis wrote:Knowing next to nothing about this subject but having been watching this thread, looking forward to seeing t' mill on Saturday and an interest in Arts and Crafts I wandered onto the Art Workers' guild site and found a W Stott as an Honorary Brother in 1893.
http://www.artworkersguild.org/media/22 ... nt-day.pdf
Bevis

Interesting ... I suspected as much. For me Howard's photo was typical of both the period and the output of the Guild members. Stott I was not familiar with having concentrated more on the central figures of the movement in my research, but I am certainly curious now to see more.
Tim Lee

JFS
Posts: 618
Joined: Wed Dec 16, 2009 3:47 pm

Re: Alpha Mill

Postby JFS » Tue Nov 27, 2018 8:41 pm

Le Corbusier wrote: I suspected as much. For me Howard's photo was typical of both the period and the output of the Guild members. Stott I was not familiar with having concentrated more on the central figures of the movement in my research, but I am certainly curious now to see more.


Interesting that such a humble place of work should have such pretensions to high art!

Alas, this is a different Stott - a pretty common name - but none of the family had the initial "W". I had a note back from my academic mate who very much doubts that any of the Oldham Stotts were involved in such organisations which were rather rarefied outfits whereas the mill "Architects" were pretty down to earth. Even "Sir Phillip Stott" was only knighted for being Lord Sheriff of Gloucestershire - long after he had moved away from the smoke and soot where he was just plain Sydney Stott. And he designed mills all over the world, some nice examples of which still stand in Holland, Germany and France - but no recognition for that...

Most likely then that George pinched this out of a book! But I still rather like it.

Best Wishes,

User avatar
Le Corbusier
Posts: 1130
Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2015 3:39 pm

Re: Alpha Mill

Postby Le Corbusier » Tue Nov 27, 2018 9:11 pm

ah well ... even as a pattern book offering its still rather fine to my eye. The Mill itself is also a rather fine if 'humble' building don't you think .. not quite the industrial estate tin shed of today's output. I find it telling that today we are converting yesterdays humble buildings into high end residential dwellings for the rich (warehouses as well as mills) - it does give pause for thought.

Interestingly William Stott was from Oldham and the son of a Mill owner but a painter rather than a craftsman or architect.
Tim Lee

JFS
Posts: 618
Joined: Wed Dec 16, 2009 3:47 pm

Re: Alpha Mill

Postby JFS » Tue Nov 27, 2018 10:12 pm

Le Corbusier wrote:Interestingly William Stott was from Oldham and the son of a Mill owner but a painter rather than a craftsman or architect.


I think the father was Abraham Stott, cousin of AH Stott Snr. who was the uncle of George Stott......... so they ARE all related.
Abraham Stott's Osborne mills still stand - the No 1 mill was by A.H Stott senior, the No 2 by Sydney Stott... (kick one and they all limp...).
Anyone thinking that the Stotts did everything in Oldham should look at the Lees family...

Best Wishes,

ralphrobertson
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Nov 27, 2013 3:57 pm

Re: Alpha Mill

Postby ralphrobertson » Wed Nov 28, 2018 8:58 am

Here is the family tree taken out of the book 'Stott and Sons, architects of the Lancashire Cotton Mill'. The book itself contains a lot in information about mills in general particularly their construction and proved to be an interesting read. There are lots of photos in there too and I learnt a lot from it.
img-181128085025.pdf
(79.11 KiB) Downloaded 20 times


Ralph

JFS
Posts: 618
Joined: Wed Dec 16, 2009 3:47 pm

Re: Alpha Mill

Postby JFS » Wed Nov 28, 2018 3:40 pm

Many thanks and well done for plugging my mate's book Ralph - it was to Roger that I put the question which Tim asked. I also sent him a photo of Alpha Mill without any background information, and he came back with ... "What a splendid model of a George Stott mill!". And he IS the REAL expert! He may just turn up to shake your hand over the weekend.

There is also info here:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stott

which contains the reference to Abraham Stott, father of WIlliam Stott.

Roger also co-wrote this:- "Sidney Stott en de Engelse spinnerijen in Munsterland en Twente" downloadable here:-
https://www.lwl.org/wim-download/pdf/stott_inhalt_screen.pdf.
Don't be put off by the Dutch title as it is in German and English as well. Unfortunately in the download version the photos are not up to much.

Good luck for the show this weekend!

Best Wishes,

ralphrobertson
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Nov 27, 2013 3:57 pm

Re: Alpha Mill

Postby ralphrobertson » Wed Nov 28, 2018 5:04 pm

That link contains a lot of interesting stuff Howard. To see the Lancashire style mill in both Germany and the Netherlands is certainly an eye opener and shows the impact that this part of England had on the world in general. Excellent stuff.

I continue to be amazed at the amount of material on this subject that you are able to put your hands on Howard and can only thank you for helping us along this journey allowing me to be able to produce something that is not only an accurate representation of a cotton mill but one that fits the space we have on the model perfectly. 9 months ago, to me, a cotton mill was just a big building that had a few floors and was BIG but now I know much more about it and feel a lot more confident at producing something that looks right.

Ralph


Return to “Other Buildings and Scenery”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest