Johnson 1P

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Serjt-Dave
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Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2012 3:31 pm

Johnson 1P

Postby Serjt-Dave » Mon Aug 24, 2020 3:47 pm

Hi All. As I was hoping to have the 4f done and dusted {HA!} I decided to start my next loco, a Johnson 1p 0-4-4 Tank Engine. This will be based around a Craftsman kit and the Rumney Models chassis.

The Craftsman kit I got off of evil bay and it came with a set of Ultrascale wheels. As this is a round top 1p I'll be making it as S&D engine 1303 or as it was later 58047.

As you do, I started with the chassis. The Rumney chassis goes together well and it has some nice features like the removable keeper plate which makes wheel removal so much more easy. I've basically got it a rolling chassis but due to me ordering the wrong hornblocks for the bogie production has halted. Whilst I wait for the replacement parts I thought I'd get on the the body. Lord know how old the design of the Craftsman kit is but it does go together quite well but it's certainly not up to today's standard. First thing I had to change was the buffer beam. 1303 had rounded ends and was quite thick. So I rounded the ends of buffer beam etch and fitted them to the footplate along with the valances. I then using scrap etch strips built up the thickness of the buffer beam and then filed them to match the rounded end of the buffer beam. This loco didn't have any overhang of the footplate over the buffer beam so I filed it flush. The buffers were added next but they needed to have packing pieces added behind them on the buffer beam. I then soldered in place the rear bunker. I cocked up a bit hear, I should have soldered the bunker rear as far forwards as I could to create more of a ledge between the bunker and buffer beam. I made up the tank sides next but the tank tops had to be reduced in length as they came to far into the cab. Once they were shortened { and yes I did cut one too short} I soldered them to the tank sides but slightly below the top edge to create a lip. I added some thin sheeting to the inside of the tanks in the cab area to finish them off. I held off from fitting them on to the footplate until I had sorted out the back of the cab and the coal space etc. This kit was designed to take a Ringfield motor the arse of which filled the cab area. The bloody great hole had to be filled. I took the original part that fitted into the bunker and modified it. Where the coal would sit was plated over so I cut out the centre section to create the coal space and either side of the coal space would be the rear tanks {I didn't know there was water tanks in the coal bunker}. The front part of the original part is meant to fold down to form sort of legs to support the rear of the cab, I cut these just past the fold lines and at an angle which would become the front and top of the rear tanks. Using scrap material I made up and fitted the sides, back and the bottom of the coal space. Again using scrap material I made up the front of the bunker, coal space and tanks, fitting also the coal chute. This just left a hole in the top of the bunker inside the cab. On the real loco there was a locker in this position. I made up the lid of the locker out of some scrap and added a latch and hinges and soldered it into place. I had to make the lid slightly over size to cover the hole, but I think it works. Before fitting the top part of the cab I added spectacle plates over the windows, the front ones were made from washers the rear ones are the ones supplied with the kit and had bars in them which I removed and added better ones to the cab rear. Next I soldered the main tanks in place and added the beading to the top of the bunker and tanks. Before I soldered the top of the cab in place I made up a floor. As there were all sorts of funny angles and shapes to contend with I used paper templates. Once happy with a paper template I used it to make one from some brass sheet and of course it didn't fit. So much for the template. After some fettling I got the floor fit. I then soldered the top half of cab into place. As with all edging on a loco it would have had a beading covering it. The cab opening didn't have any supplied with the kit but I was lucky to find some etch beading in my scrap box.
Well that's the state of play with my 1p at the moment, I will keep on the the body works until the replacement arrives and I can get the chassis finished.

Keep Safe
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Paul Townsend
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Re: Johnson 1P

Postby Paul Townsend » Mon Aug 24, 2020 4:21 pm

I have had one of these running on Highbridge for many years. Since it predates the Rumney chassis it has a DiY job which works adequately.
I have a second to build and that will have a Justin (Rumney) chassis.

I like your detailed mods and wonder if you will be do any of the Pete Tarver enhancements?

Bad luck about the lever frame and leg accident!

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Serjt-Dave
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Re: Johnson 1P

Postby Serjt-Dave » Mon Aug 24, 2020 4:51 pm

Thanks Paul. I think the first one I brought was about 1982 {ish} and paid £29 for it. Most of the ones I've got off E bay have been almost three times as much. I would have love to have some of Peters etches on my loco, especially the tank fillers but alas he's unable to produces the etches. If I can survive a Brassmasters 4f I can deal with anything. LOL.

Keep Safe

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Serjt-Dave
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Re: Johnson 1P

Postby Serjt-Dave » Thu Mar 04, 2021 11:29 pm

Whilst waiting for paint to dry on my LMS coach and getting board painting it's passengers I thought I starting tucking into my next unfinished project, the Johnson 1P. So removing said item off my restocked shelf of shame I set about reminding myself where I had left off. Body work about 30% done and the chassis about 60% complete. The pile of orrible castings soon put me off tackling the body so I collected all the chassis bits and bobs. Checking things through, the next job was assemble the gearbox and motor and fit to the chassis. That all went well. Next I wanted to check that I had the rear bogie made up correctly and checking that I attached it to the chassis. Looking at the instruction I had almost come to the end leaving only the boiler band clips and the ashpan. There is no part for this supplied with the Rumney chassis kit other than the front and rear pated that are attached to the keeper plate. Looking at Pete T thread on his build he has made up a template for the ashpan. I made up a piece of n/s to the recommended size. If you bend up the ashpan and fit straight to the keeper plate you won't be able to attach the due to the brake shaft being in the way. On the real engine Johnson had it where the ashpan was cut around the brake shaft. What was Johnson smoking at the time he thought that one up. Common sense prevailed and it looks like on some engines had a shorter ashpan or it arched over the brake shaft and this is the option I went for.

Thankfully Mr Palmer had had outlined this modification of the ashpan on a GA Drawing which was very helpful {thanks John}, so I could work out where I needed to cut and shape the ashpan. First of all I bent up the ashpan to it's full length and worked out how far back it needed to be removed to clear the brake shaft which was about 4mm and scribed a line. This is where I would put a bulkhead. I then marked 3mm from the edge, this is where I would cut to just to be on the safe side. I then made up from scrap n/s a bulkhead and soldered to the underside of the ashpan at the 4mm mark. After checking the fit I ended up filing the rear edge back to the 4mm mark a bulkhead. I had only removed the bottom of the ashpan to clear the brake shaft, I now needed to remove and shape the rest of the rear of the ashpan which is like a backwards S. Once done I rounded all the edges of the ashpan and then removed the top half of the original rear bulkhead on the keeper plate. I needed to retain the bottom half as it's a guide and support for the link that holds the bogie to the chassis. I'm pleased with how the ashpan turned out. I think I've still got to add some rivet details but that's for another day.

Keep Safe

Dave
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John Palmer
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Re: Johnson 1P

Postby John Palmer » Sat Mar 06, 2021 1:26 pm

Looking good, Dave!

I recommend you to profit from my error and substitute a more accurate smokebox door in the place of the one supplied by Craftsman, which is too deeply dished and oversize in diameter. If there was one thing I could now change on my model of 58047 it would be this, but too late did I learn of the availability of more suitable doors see https://www.scalefour.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=95&t=5905&p=65928&hilit=Oh+dear+1P#p65923. You may well need to fashion a new 'horseshoe' plate for the front of the smokebox in order to fit a smaller diameter door, but In my view it will be worth it.

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Serjt-Dave
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Re: Johnson 1P

Postby Serjt-Dave » Sat Mar 06, 2021 6:37 pm

Thanks John. I hope you and yours are keeping well. Yes I remembered you telling me about the Craftsman casting being incorrect so I got a Gibson one. The main issue with the Gibson door is the locking bolts were in the wrong place. Pete T mentions this in his thread on the 1P. I removed one and added two in the correct position. If you look at the top of the door you'll see the shadows of the two holes for the handrail knobs. I got the handrail all soldered in looking quite nice {even if I do say so myself} and then realised the handrail is meant to be below the top hinge. By then I had enough of snapping drill bits drill through the cast brass so will have to redo the handrail.

My next job was to make up and replace the brake cylinder. The one supplied with the Craftsman kit is bloody awful. I used the GA Drawings to guide me through the process and I think it turned out quite well {again even if I do say so myself}. A couple of issues I had with it though, when I soldered bits of wire into the top plate of the cylinder to represent the eight bolts that fix the top plate to the cylinder body, the solder filled in the gap between the top plate and and the flange plate. The other issue was when I attached it to the chassis I had to pack it out to align with the brake leaver pull rod thingy. I checked all my sizes etc so I don't know what went wrong there.

Next is to either replace of hack about these sandboxes.

Keep Safe

Dave
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Serjt-Dave
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Re: Johnson 1P

Postby Serjt-Dave » Mon Mar 08, 2021 10:22 pm

Evening All. Basically finished constructing the chassis today. Made up and fitted the sandboxes. It was either totally scratch build them or modify them. I chose to modify them and in hindsight I wish I had made made them from scratch. Spent a lot of time squaring up very poor castings only then having to remove great chunks of them to get them to the correct size. Still I know for the next time. Other than a little more detail work on the chassis and fitting pickups etc it's done but that will have to wait while I finish off painting my coach.

Keep Safe

Dave

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John Palmer
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Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2011 11:09 pm

Re: Johnson 1P

Postby John Palmer » Tue Mar 09, 2021 1:07 am

Those look like very neat jobs both on the brake cylinder and the smokebox door - I can't detect where you changed the locking dog positions. Smokebox door handrail positions could be a moving feast: on 58086 the rail was above the top hinge on arrival on the Dorset, but was subseqeuently repositioned below it. No change in position with 58047 so far as I am aware.

I'd be interested to know why the brake piston arrangement was changed on the 2228 class; I suspect it may have been to avoid making brake pressure dependent on the integrity of the gland through which the brake piston rod passed.

Two sandboxes down, but the two leading sandboxes (and associated filler caps) to go. A nice straightforward job with gravity sanders. Will you be fitting a representation of the brake release spring that attaches to the offside trailing brake hanger?

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Serjt-Dave
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Re: Johnson 1P

Postby Serjt-Dave » Tue Mar 09, 2021 7:08 am

Hi John. I'll be attaching what to where now? LOL. I would do if I knew what it was. Do you have a image of one?

I keep forgetting about the front sandboxes. These will be pretty straight forward to make and attach though you can barely see them tucked underneath the footplate. As you say the sandpipes are nice and simple but I will leave them off till the end before fitting as they get in the way.

Keep Safe

Dave

John Palmer
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Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2011 11:09 pm

Re: Johnson 1P

Postby John Palmer » Tue Mar 09, 2021 10:04 am

If you have a copy of the Wild Swan profile on Midland 1833 and 2228 class bogie tanks you can find a drawing that shows the brake release spring arrangement as applied to the nearside leading hanger at page 32 (I can let you have a copy if you don't have this profile). I don't have a photograph clearly showing the release spring on 58047, so I'm attaching a picture showing my representation of it on my model. As you can see, it had to be attached to the trailing hanger on this locomotive due to the presence of the leading sandboxes.
58047 brake release spring.jpg
It's a very simple turning with the spring coils simulated by shallow plunge cuts with a parting tool. The picture also shows my attempt at representing the 'double hanger' arrangement for each brake shoe that was a characteristic of this locomotive.

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Serjt-Dave
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Re: Johnson 1P

Postby Serjt-Dave » Tue Mar 09, 2021 12:04 pm

Thanks John, now I know what to look for. Yes I do have a copy of the Profile book thanks. I don't have a lathe so will make the spring from a suitable gauge bit of copper wire. It's weird that it's only on one side? I can just see the front sandbox and the down pipe. Even on the actual engine the pipe drops the sand well ahead of the wheel which must make it less effective when pulling away? Some of the class had a sandbox between the drivers and it's pipe dropped sand ahead of the rear driver giving it sand both fore and aft.

Oh well back to painting passengers for the Bridgewater service.

Keep Safe

Dave


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