Page 6 of 7

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Sun Mar 25, 2018 7:51 am
by RobM
Thanks Richard.

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Mon Apr 02, 2018 4:46 pm
by RobM
Well, day by day I have slowly been adapting with just one 'working' arm. During the last few days have drawn up the plan for the workshops to the left of the layout, drawn up the windows on the computer and got them cut on the Silhouette and am now able to cut styrene so have started on the actual building. So no more going stir crazy watching daytime telly!!!!..........Things are progressing again albeit slowly..... :thumb
Rob

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:50 pm
by Le Corbusier
good to hear Rob :thumb ... admire your get up and go ;)

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Wed Apr 04, 2018 6:32 am
by Flymo748
RobM wrote:Well, day by day I have slowly been adapting with just one 'working' arm. During the last few days have drawn up the plan for the workshops to the left of the layout, drawn up the windows on the computer and got them cut on the Silhouette and am now able to cut styrene so have started on the actual building. So no more going stir crazy watching daytime telly!!!!..........Things are progressing again albeit slowly..... :thumb
Rob


Have they given you any physiotherapy exercises yet? Keeping mobility in your fingers of the broken side is one of the things that will help recovery significantly when the break is healed (in my experience).

When my left wrist was smashed into pieces, there was a great emphasis on physio, and as a consequence I have back far more movement than the surgeon ever expected possible. Keeping your hand mobile will be a good thing when it comes to recovery. One of the scariest things about my experience was when the metalwork was removed, how little movement I had because the muscles were wasted through inactivity. Even if it's just flexing your fingers to hold a model, it will help.

GWS!
Flymo

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Wed Apr 04, 2018 8:09 am
by RobM
Le Corbusier wrote:good to hear Rob :thumb ... admire your get up and go ;)

Thanks Tim

Flymo748 wrote:
Have they given you any physiotherapy exercises yet? Keeping mobility in your fingers of the broken side is one of the things that will help recovery significantly when the break is healed (in my experience).

When my left wrist was smashed into pieces, there was a great emphasis on physio, and as a consequence I have back far more movement than the surgeon ever expected possible. Keeping your hand mobile will be a good thing when it comes to recovery. One of the scariest things about my experience was when the metalwork was removed, how little movement I had because the muscles were wasted through inactivity. Even if it's just flexing your fingers to hold a model, it will help.

GWS!
Flymo


Paul, just advice to exercise the shoulder, elbow and fingers which I am doing. Holding down styrene when cutting also exercises other arm muscles. Fortunately my break was not anywhere near as bad as yours being just a hairline fracture on the ulna close to the wrist. Physio will be assessed when the plaster comes off on the 23rd.
Rob

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:44 am
by RobM
Plaster now off....... :thumb ....but have not been idle the past four weeks.......Have started building coal wagons and started the workshop building on the left.

progress-260418.JPG
progress-260418.JPG (392.59 KiB) Viewed 2918 times


Rob

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Thu Apr 26, 2018 5:40 pm
by Phil O
Cracking stuff, Rob.

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:02 pm
by Colin Parks
Hi Rob,

Looking good. You have been doing more with one hand than I have with two!

All the best,

Colin

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Fri Apr 27, 2018 6:44 am
by RobM
Phil O wrote:Cracking stuff, Rob.

Thanks Phil.

Colin Parks wrote:Hi Rob,

Looking good. You have been doing more with one hand than I have with two!

All the best,

Colin


Well I have been able to do about 8 hours a day, 7 days a week for the last four weeks but now I don't have an excuse for not tackling the garden and all the other jobs that have mounted up........ :(
Rob

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:18 am
by Allan Goodwillie
Hi Rob, :)

It is all looking good and you will soon have the other hand back. Good to meet up at Scalefour North. I am working in the garden this week as well - complete rebuild job starting with the greenhouse which is now up and paths being tackled over the next few days - will be good to get back to some modelling on a smaller scale.

Allan :)

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Fri Apr 27, 2018 4:52 pm
by RobM
Thanks Allan, certainly had a good chin wag again having so much in common.

Taking a leaf out of Jim's (S W) thread I will be having lighting in some of the buildings (although I have drawn the line on a night time, rainy day.... ;) ). I have detailed the pit head buildings with a tippler and narrow gauge track work. The workshop is also lit and the intention was to model machine tools etc......I built up the lathe from strip and styrene but in hind sight I don't think it will be clearly visible so it may be duplicated and have a 'scrapper' outside the building as I did on Mount Woodville......just great working on the hoof........in the meantime I'm switching between buildings, rolling stock etc........once I have started on Tim's board there will be some track laying.........
Rob

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Fri Apr 27, 2018 5:12 pm
by Allan Goodwillie
Hi Rob, :)

I have always included lighting in my buildings Rob and it is a real pleasure operating Dubbieside at night using the layout lights only. I did an article in MRJ a number of years ago on this . The railway at night was so atmospheric. The new layout is similar and will also have a similar setup. I am sure it will bring much pleasure to you and I look forward to seeing the photographs. Hope your wife enjoyed the exhibition as well.

Allan :)

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Sat Apr 28, 2018 6:07 am
by RobM
Allan Goodwillie wrote:Hi Rob, :)

I have always included lighting in my buildings Rob and it is a real pleasure operating Dubbieside at night using the layout lights only. I did an article in MRJ a number of years ago on this . The railway at night was so atmospheric. The new layout is similar and will also have a similar setup. I am sure it will bring much pleasure to you and I look forward to seeing the photographs. Hope your wife enjoyed the exhibition as well.

Allan :)


Well, you have set me thinking now Allan........Guess it is logical to model the interiors of the buildings and take on new challenges.
Yup, Jen enjoys the exhibitions although she does not remember many of the people we meet but she always appreciates the understanding and kindness shown.
Rob

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 5:01 pm
by RobM
I've been quiet for a while but things are moving on. I've decided to retire Manston Brewery and 'nicked' the locos. Well one was previously nicked and appears on Mount Woodville with a re-spray, likewise with the colliery project. I have 99% completed a High Level Hawthorne Leslie 0-6-0ST, the scenic baseboard is virtually completed, the Templot plan has been finalised, a coach (a 6 wheeler) for bringing in the miners from out lying areas is 50% complete. In the near future I will move this on to the SGW topic. Sorry, no photos at the moment.........just replaced the old motorhome for a newer model so off on our jollies very soon...........
Rob

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 5:09 pm
by Le Corbusier
sounds fun ... what have you got?

I need to drop the engine on my 71 VW combi before I can get it on the road again for the summer ... modern ethanol rotting the fuel feed to the tank :shock: plus a new exhaust and manifold to fit hey ho ;)

Looking forward to some new photos of the layout ... really interested in this one. :thumb

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 5:24 pm
by RobM
Tim, started having probs with the turbo on the '04 Autosleeper which has 90,000 on the clock and really wanted something with a bit less mileage and a bit more modern. Just loved the Autosleeper range but nothing in our price range in the used market, so gone for a 2011 Elddis Autoquest with just 10,000 on the clock and within price......should see me out until the end. Got a 4 week tour of Wales lined up as soon as I take delivery on the 18th of this month......Hey, enjoy the work on your VW!!!!
Hopefully some photos before we go away......
Rob

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 5:30 pm
by Le Corbusier
RobM wrote: 2011 Elddis Autoquest with just 10,000 on the clock and within price......should see me out until the end.


Now that's what I call grown up luxury :thumb

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 5:38 pm
by RobM
I think that as I approach 70 along with some other eminent members of this forum, 1948 was an excellent vintage, that I can be considered as grown up.... ;) A little less storage but we'll sort it.........
Rob

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 8:34 pm
by steve howe
Hum...
Well it was all going splendidly until you started talking about motorhomes...... :evil:

I live near the North Cornish coast which has more than its fair share of campsites....and narrow lanes..... :twisted:

Anyway, back to modelling :thumb

Steve :D

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 7:35 am
by Allan Goodwillie
Lots of lovely little railways in Wales Rob I hope you both enjoy your holiday! :)

Most of my time of late has been taken up with gardening and building the blacksmith's shop for Burntisland. This week I have been working on the layouts in the garage and then we too are going to do holiday type things - so probably nothing done to the new layout for at least another month. Summer up here has been fantastic so far, long may it continue! Enjoy yourselves lads!

I know you will like this Rob, here is a shot of it on the layout as part of the engine shed scene which was on show at Railex. My building was just one of a number built by ten individuals in the group, so genuinely a group effort, as has been the rest of Burntisland over the years. The main engine shed has been built by Lindsay who has been the driving force during the development of this last extension to the layout. Work on this extension will still continue for some time to come.

DSC03107.JPG


Allan :)

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 5:16 pm
by RobM
Looking good Alan........

Thought I'd post 3 of the 6 16 ton mineral wagons..........

16-tonners.jpg
16-tonners.jpg (168.77 KiB) Viewed 2230 times


Parkside bodies, Bill Bedford under frames. Sprayed grey with Halfords grey primer and weathered with Burnt Umber and Burnt Sienna artist acrylics using combination of dry brush and wet in wet technique. Fox transfers.
Rob

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 5:51 pm
by Le Corbusier
steve howe wrote:Hum...
Well it was all going splendidly until you started talking about motorhomes...... :evil:

I live near the North Cornish coast which has more than its fair share of campsites....and narrow lanes..... :twisted:

Anyway, back to modelling :thumb

Steve :D


You need to have some annoyances when living in heaven you know :thumb ....just to keep you grounded.

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 5:53 pm
by Le Corbusier
RobM wrote:Looking good Alan........

Thought I'd post 3 of the 6 16 ton mineral wagons..........

16-tonners.jpg

Parkside bodies, Bill Bedford under frames. Sprayed grey with Halfords grey primer and weathered with Burnt Umber and Burnt Sienna artist acrylics using combination of dry brush and wet in wet technique. Fox transfers.
Rob


I love the subtlety of your weathering Rob ... good stuff :thumb

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 7:47 pm
by Noel
Sorry to tell you this, Rob, but, while the MCO looks fine, the other two 16T both have problems. All non-fitted BR wagons in the pale grey, with negligible exceptions, had all the lettering and numbering [also the bottom door "V"s where present] on black patches [there were a few in a much darker grey which did not]. The patches were applied separately for the load and the number when new; after repaint there was normally one large patch containing both figures. Also, the end door stripes were officially 2.5 inches wide and ran to the top corner, although in practice many ended somewhere around the top of the end door.

Re: Where will this lead......

Posted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:03 am
by RobM
Le Corbusier wrote:
I love the subtlety of your weathering Rob ... good stuff :thumb

Thanks Tim

Noel wrote:Sorry to tell you this, Rob, but, while the MCO looks fine, the other two 16T both have problems. All non-fitted BR wagons in the pale grey, with negligible exceptions, had all the lettering and numbering [also the bottom door "V"s where present] on black patches [there were a few in a much darker grey which did not]. The patches were applied separately for the load and the number when new; after repaint there was normally one large patch containing both figures. Also, the end door stripes were officially 2.5 inches wide and ran to the top corner, although in practice many ended somewhere around the top of the end door.


Don't be sorry Noel, I was hoping that someone would come up and put me right on the lettering and numbering. At least 4 of the 6 wagons so far are correct being MCO so just the 2 to rectify. Thanks for pointing my errors out....... :thumb
Rob