Lost Property

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David B
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Lost Property

Postby David B » Tue Feb 03, 2015 6:07 pm

This thread is for things that don't have a home.

I have been making a complete sow's ear of applying some strapping to my fish wagon. I won't go in to detail but I had to remove the offending pieces (two of them) and, of course, the nice clean side of the wagon was smeared with solder.

I have added two tools to my box - really expensive items that came from scrap!
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Last year, at Railex I think, I was chatting with Paul Hutfield of the Bristol Group. The conversation was about soldering and cleaning work. Somewhere along the line the use of brass to clean brass came up. Eminently sensible. Steel, as in scalpel blades and chisels, is harder than brass and scratches it. Brass being the same hardness (or as near as) does not scratch brass.

So I found this lump of brass - 23 x 10 x 2mm - filed one end so that to was straight with a slight bevel and lapped the bottom to make it flat. The second 'chisel' is an off-cut of etch 1mm wide which I fashioned with a file.
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I took a picture of the wagon side but the camera does not adjust to the light as well as one's eye and the result did not show anything worthwhile, but I can tell you that the solder has been removed, even from around two rivets, and with a little help from a glass fibre brush I have a nice clean area ready to muck up again!

Thank you, Paul.

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David B
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Jewellers' tools

Postby David B » Sun Sep 04, 2016 10:17 am

A couple of tools I picked up recently from my favourite tool shop, the Tool Box in Colyton. The business is up for sale but so far, there have been no takers and it looks as though we might lose it. I have bought a number of useful old tools over the years together with taps (£1 - £1.50) and dies (£3 or so) for 8BA to 14BA.

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The tool on the left is a jeweller's cog wheel puller. The plunger in the centre is spring loaded. As you then push the handle, the jaws go behind the cog and gently pull it off. This was expensive - £12.50 but I couldn't leave it in the shop!

The pin vice on the right is beautifully worked and the jaws pristine. £3. I have already used this to hold fine wire I am using for rain strips.

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David B
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Lamp storage

Postby David B » Sat Feb 04, 2017 4:46 pm

With the advent of the marvellous Modelu loco, side, tail and signal lamps, you might need to find a convenient way of storing them.

How about re-using old cases previously used for contact lenses?

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Tim V
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Re: Lost Property

Postby Tim V » Sat Feb 04, 2017 5:11 pm

I don't wear contact lenses, but perhaps there's a market for used ones?
Tim V
Scalefour News Editor

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Allan Goodwillie
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Re: Lost Property

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Sun Feb 05, 2017 9:10 am

Hi David, :)

I like the idea of the brass scrapers, I have been finishing some locos lately using my usual steel scrapers with the occasional marks they tend to leave behind, I will try out your idea on my next loco with a mix of brass and nickel-silver scrapers.

Thanks! :thumb

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John Bateson
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Re: Lost Property

Postby John Bateson » Sun Feb 05, 2017 9:27 am

Speaking of scrapers - I have found that warming up the area to be scraped makes the scraping easier. I use a little solder cream (in my case Nealetin) and apply a soldering iron. The solder cream is usually very easy to remove with the usual fibre brush after the main areas to be removed are finished.
I suspect a domestic hair dryer would be as effective if I was allowed to use it.

In my case the scrapers are
a) an old dental tool
b) a scriber suitable sharpened at the flat end as needed

John
Slaving away still on GCR stuff ...
Avoiding the soaps ...
http://www.greatcentralmodels.co.uk

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Allan Goodwillie
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Re: Lost Property

Postby Allan Goodwillie » Sun Feb 05, 2017 12:05 pm

That's interesting too John, :)

I would not have thought of heating to soften the solder and using a hair drier to do it, must try it too. I have a set of burnishing tools which can be used with Jeweller's rouge and, if that is not available, soap, which can be used to take out any blemishes after I have used a glass fibre brush or a brass brush which I sometimes use.

At the stage of washing to get rid of any flux. I use a basic toothpaste and toothbrush to clear the surfaces as the aluminium oxide leaves the surface in a good state and there are no traces of flux. Sometimes the cheapest is best as it is not mixed with other materials which might leave a film of some kind which could cause problems later.

Before painting I also use an old airbrush with some abrasive powder which scours the surface and makes it slightly, microscopically rough before painting as I find it helps the paint to get a good grip.

David Orr was over the other day and we were discussing this very topic as he is making his first chassis - one of Chris's for a J72 and we were discussing this very thing. I have covered it in my starters group topic on building chassis. I am sure this thread will elicit a few useful tips so I will make a link to this thread as it develops as it will probably complement what I am doing with them. It will also get them into looking around the site as it covers a multitude of interesting things and things born out of experience.

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David B
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Useful tools

Postby David B » Tue Oct 10, 2017 9:59 am

I have done a couple of demonstration sessions this year, the last at Scaleforum. Much interest was taken in a couple of tools I was using. Several people have told me since that they have bought one or both of the following an found them very useful.

1. Hackle pliers by Veniard, from your local angling shop. They come in two types: standard (on the right) and easy grip with comfortable brass pads. Cost: around £2.50 / £2.75. The grip is quite strong and the jaws are nigh parallel. I have a pair of each.

hackle-pliers_2955.jpg
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2. Ceramic tipped tweezers. These I bought off Ebay for about £3.50 a pair. A product of the vaping business, the jaws are heatproof to 1600oC which makes them ideal for soldering. There is no need to mess up the tips of metal tweezers, heating and cooling them which ruins the temper and distorts them. I also find glue does not stick hard to the ceramic jaws when dry and can easily be removed. One point though - don't drop them or push too hard with them or the tips will chip. The jaws are replaceable - if anyone can find replacement tips, please let me know as I have not found any yet!

ceramic_2956.jpg
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Rod Cameron
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Re: Lost Property

Postby Rod Cameron » Tue Oct 10, 2017 10:48 am

I could see those ceramic tweezers being handy for 3-link coupling and uncoupling for those, like me, who don't get on with hooks but still have to put up with residual magnetism.
Rod

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David B
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Re: Lost Property

Postby David B » Mon Sep 23, 2019 4:01 pm

Not one of the most fascinating, interesting or stimulating pictures I have taken, but the subject matter is very useful.

Small dishes for bits are useful and I came across this one in Wilko. It has a rubbery base, is 9cm square and 4cm tall. Cost - 80p. It is called a Small Drawer Organiser - there are one or two larger types as well.

dish_g3639.jpg

Enigma
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Re: Lost Property

Postby Enigma » Mon Sep 23, 2019 7:14 pm

First time I've visited this thread but the mention above of heat guns is interesting. If anyone watches 'The Repair Shop' on BBC 2 you might have seen the repair of an Antimony jewellery box with low melt solder (Antimony has a very low melting point) and the guy doing it used a high temperature heat gun (a paint stripping gun?) so as to avoid touching the metal with a solder iron bit. It seemed to work well on what was quite a long joint. Anyone used this technique on a white metal kit?

Terry Bendall
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Re: Lost Property

Postby Terry Bendall » Mon Sep 23, 2019 7:28 pm

David B wrote:Small dishes for bits are useful


Yes they are but being mean I tend to use any small plastic boxes or trays that I come across. Examples are the clear covers on Oxford Die Cast vehicles, boxes that business cards are supplied in and other small containers that might otherwise go in the rubbish bin. For larger items, margarine tubs and ice cream tubs are also useful especially for kits under construction. If the lids are used everything is kept together and clean. A felt pen takes care of identifying what is inside and they stack nicely on a shelf.

Terry Bendall

Philip Hall
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Re: Lost Property

Postby Philip Hall » Tue Sep 24, 2019 3:24 pm

A useful source of small trays has been the little plastic dishes that airlines put their puddings in. From the good old days when you got a meal, of course. Also I have used substantially made boxes that chocolates are supplied in.

Philip

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steve howe
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Re: Lost Property

Postby steve howe » Fri Sep 27, 2019 1:55 pm

Not that I eat much take-away nosh, but nowadays more takeouts seem to come in shallow plastic containers with lids. The deeper ones will accommodate a tank loco or tender-less loco for safe storage, while the shallower ones are ideal for all those bits that come in kits. I also have stashes of scenic materials in them.

Phil O
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Re: Useful tools

Postby Phil O » Tue Oct 01, 2019 12:08 pm

David B wrote:I have done a couple of demonstration sessions this year, the last at Scaleforum. Much interest was taken in a couple of tools I was using. Several people have told me since that they have bought one or both of the following an found them very useful.

1. Hackle pliers by Veniard, from your local angling shop. They come in two types: standard (on the right) and easy grip with comfortable brass pads. Cost: around £2.50 / £2.75. The grip is quite strong and the jaws are nigh parallel. I have a pair of each.

hackle-pliers_2955.jpg

2. Ceramic tipped tweezers. These I bought off Ebay for about £3.50 a pair. A product of the vaping business, the jaws are heatproof to 1600oC which makes them ideal for soldering. There is no need to mess up the tips of metal tweezers, heating and cooling them which ruins the temper and distorts them. I also find glue does not stick hard to the ceramic jaws when dry and can easily be removed. One point though - don't drop them or push too hard with them or the tips will chip. The jaws are replaceable - if anyone can find replacement tips, please let me know as I have not found any yet!

ceramic_2956.jpg



I have 3 pairs of ceramic tweezers each with different ends, I bought them as a set on Ebay for around £3.50 from China. I would point out that the tips hold the heat for a while.


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