From a Loco Works in Norfolk

User avatar
Lord Colnago
Posts: 346
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:42 pm

From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Mon Feb 09, 2015 10:49 pm

I have been quietly beavering away at producing something to pull all of those wagons you have seen elsewhere. I thought I'd start with another salutory lesson in not being able to make your mind up. Take a look at this wonderful little beastie.

IMAG0074.jpg


She's a Hornby, fitted with Ultrascale conversion wheelsets. Brassmasters coupling rods, Laserglaze windows and SouthWest Digital sound. I fitted the speaker behind the front radiator grille. This can be carefully prised off and holes drilled in the blank face beneath to allow the sound out. The grille can then be replaced. Doing it this way saves having the speaker visible in the cab which, I believe, is where it has to go on the Bachmann 08 and its quite a bit of work to get it out of sight. Cabs are for crews as far as I'm concerned.

Here are a couple of views of how she looks today.

IMGP0351.JPG


IMGP0353.JPG


Now to move from things internal combustion to things steamy. The Great Eastern, so history and publicity departments would have it, once built a J15 in 9hrs and 47 mins including getting the thing in steam. Unfortunately, I can't match such efficiency. I began work on my Bachmann J39 so long ago that I can't even begin to tell you when it was. The closest I can get is that I started it sometime shortly after Dave Bradwell brought out his lovely conversion chassis for it. I actually made considerable progress on the chassis before it disappeared under the pile that passes for my workbench. When it re-appeared, I had very little left to do to it. Its re-appearance was prompted by my purchase, again from Dave, of the correct tender for a GE allocated one. I worked up a tender drive for it, (my first one) and then set to work on the loco body. This has had a great deal done to it. Way back when I first got it, I thought the boiler bands were rather too bold and decided they had to go. Whilst its very worthwhile doing this to a RTR loco body, its something you should think hard about first. A lot of filler went into a lot of places where various tools had slipped or otherwise misbehaved! When almost finished, but still unpainted, I took it to RailWells, where it got some very strange looks, looking as it did, like a dalmation, with bare brass fittings! Anyway, it has Gibson chimney and dome and a plethora of Dave Bradwell's lost wax fittings. The Westinghouse pump is a Riceworks job, which is rather nice, and the Westinghouse pipes on front and rear were knocked up by my good self. I can't think of anything else to tell you about it but if there's anything you want to know about any of the above, you know what to do.

Having said all that, here are some images of it. I finished it in its final condition, as it would have been just prior to withdrawal. A good number, if not all, of these GE allocated J39s were brought into Stratford works during 1956 and finished with the crests shown on the model. Stratford must have had a surplus of these larger ones to use up, given that the new crests were appearing around then. None of these locos, as far as I'm aware, made their way back into the works for any kind of major work prior to their withdrawal in 1960-61.

IMGP0356.JPG


IMGP0357.JPG


IMGP0358.JPG


IMGP0359.JPG


IMGP0360.JPG


IMGP0364.JPG


Another diesel is currently in the paint shops and when it re-appears I'll post something in the earnest hope that I can prove that not every loco takes me a decade or so to finish!
The second best priest

User avatar
Lord Colnago
Posts: 346
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:42 pm

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Sun Feb 22, 2015 10:47 pm

Having shown you what I've been up to recently, I thought I should document the construction of my next loco from start to finish. I have to confess to being a little nervous about this, especially as, for me, it means a number of firsts. My first 8 coupled loco, my first time putting Walshearts valve gear together and my first time tackling what most would regard as a quality loco kit. So, what is it?

IMGP0370.JPG


I have to confess to being a bit of a fan of Dave's kits. Whilst this is the first full loco kit of his that I've tackled, I've built a number of his other kits and, without exception, they have proved thoroughly satisfying and great fun. There's a real sense of achievement when you finish one, whether it be a humble wagon chassis or a loco chassis, so I'm really looking forward to this.

I've chosen to model 90484, a Vulcan loco. This is the WD that I have the most photos of on the North Woolwich branch. All two of them! It does seem to be rather camera shy as I can't find pictures of it anywhere else, but at least I know it traversed the line I'm basing my layout on. I haven't yet been able to verify some of the variations in components carried by it, so I'm hoping to do so during construction. Otherwise, its a best guess job.

I have pretty much followed Dave's instructions when building any of his kits and I see no reason not to with this, but there will be times when I diversify. Indeed, I did during my first session this evening, although it wasn't much of a diversification, just a bit of common sense.

IMGP0372.JPG


In the instructions, Dave advises to take care when folding up the tender chassis frames, in order to avoid damage to the rivet detail that you will have pressed out. I placed a piece of card beneath the etch when placing it in the hold-and-fold and this did an admirable job of protecting said rivets, as can be seen above. Its an idea I remember seeing some years back, but I can't remember where now.

IMGP0374.JPG


Here, I've made the second fold and am using the square to check for squareness. Well, what else would I use it for? Please don't tell me!

Included with the instructions is a sheet of notes with various amendments and further advice on construction. One of these advises that access to the buffer tails and the rear of the coupling, for soldering purposes, is impossible unless an alteration is made to the rear fold up spacer. The first photo shows this unaltered, the second shows the alterations. I've probably overdone the cutting away but more room is better than too little. The third shows everything folded up and soldered to the side frames. Hopefully the photos explain what I mean.

IMGP0377.JPG


IMGP0378.JPG


IMGP0383.JPG


To complete the first session, I attached the riveted strips, shown below, along the top of the chassis. You need to ensure that the end with three rivets on it goes to the front end. The frame etch and these strips are all orientated the same way on the etch, but its easy to put the etch to one side, once you've taken the frame etch out, and turn it around without thinking. Unusually for me, I managed to get this right first time. It won't last!

These last two photos show the evening's work from above and below, as it were.

IMGP0386.JPG


IMGP0388.JPG
The second best priest

DougN
Posts: 1095
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 9:57 am

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby DougN » Mon Feb 23, 2015 1:00 am

Looking good there. Dave's kits do go nicely together. I am not sure if this one has been updated or had at source the fold out horn guides which make building fully sprung chassis a lot easier. Keep us up to date as this will be a lovely loco to see running.

One thing about Dave's kits is how little you need files for.
Doug
Still not doing enough modelling

Crepello
Posts: 116
Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2013 11:32 am

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Crepello » Mon Feb 23, 2015 10:40 am

Given the acknowledged lack of clearance for the coupling rods behind the crosshead, I dearly wish Exactoscale would come to our rescue with a scale width driving wheel. Len told me a few years ago it was on his to-do list, and he had all the necessary prototype drawings.

I know that a dispassionate look at the costs of supply has taken place since then; I wonder how many sets we'd need to buy to make it a worthwhile proposition?

DougN
Posts: 1095
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 9:57 am

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby DougN » Mon Feb 23, 2015 9:37 pm

I am not sure it is really required as Dave will have designed in as much clearance as possible. The Q6 has exactly the same problem, the clearance is extremely tight. There must be others running around and even Dave has his builds so there is already a solution with out designing and making new wheels.
Doug
Still not doing enough modelling

User avatar
Horsetan
Posts: 1189
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 9:24 am

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Horsetan » Tue Feb 24, 2015 12:30 am

Crepello wrote:Given the acknowledged lack of clearance for the coupling rods behind the crosshead, I dearly wish Exactoscale would come to our rescue with a scale width driving wheel. Len told me a few years ago it was on his to-do list, and he had all the necessary prototype drawings.

I know that a dispassionate look at the costs of supply has taken place since then; I wonder how many sets we'd need to buy to make it a worthwhile proposition?


Given the problems documented by Will L in using Exactoscale driving wheels, I think I'll stick with AGW and Ultrascale for now.
That would be an ecumenical matter.

LenPinder
Posts: 57
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 8:42 pm

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby LenPinder » Tue Feb 24, 2015 9:03 am

Lord Colnago wrote:I have to confess to being a bit of a fan of Dave's kits.


OK! I could probably make a good guess, but for the sake of us relative newbies could all more clued up members please be more specific when referring to what are probably life-long acquaintances?

Len

DougN
Posts: 1095
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 9:57 am

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby DougN » Tue Feb 24, 2015 10:52 am

I guess what you are asking is who's Dave? It is Dave Bradwell maker of some very enjoyable kits for North Eastern area rolling stock. His kits are in the hosted pages of the society!

I will also point out that I enjoy his kits along with the good Lord! I will also point out that I have no connection to Dave other than being a customer!
Doug
Still not doing enough modelling

LenPinder
Posts: 57
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 8:42 pm

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby LenPinder » Tue Feb 24, 2015 7:17 pm

DougN wrote:I guess what you are asking is who's Dave? It is Dave Bradwell maker of some very enjoyable kits for North Eastern area rolling stock. His kits are in the hosted pages of the society!

I will also point out that I enjoy his kits along with the good Lord! I will also point out that I have no connection to Dave other than being a customer!


Many thanks! But it could have been Alexander (currently a BR1F tender of his on ebay), or Clarke of Brassmasters fame, or any other Dave who might currently manufacture (or have previously) manufactured) kits. Not being one of the cognoscenti leaves one at a disadvantage sometimes ;) .

Len

DougN
Posts: 1095
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 9:57 am

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby DougN » Wed Feb 25, 2015 4:39 am

NO question is a waste of time. It certainly doesn't help that Dave Bradwell doesn't put his name on the top of the box. :cry: .

I'm looking forward to seeing more done as I have a J27 to do in the future (well all right I'll admit that I have already done some bits!)
Doug
Still not doing enough modelling

User avatar
Lord Colnago
Posts: 346
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:42 pm

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Thu Mar 05, 2015 9:31 pm

DougN wrote: I am not sure if this one has been updated or had at source the fold out horn guides which make building fully sprung chassis a lot easier.


Hi Doug, this kit employs the original hornguide method, which I used on the J39, so I have been there before, even if it was a long time ago!

Crepello wrote: I dearly wish Exactoscale would come to our rescue with a scale width driving wheel.


I notice on the C & L website that some new driving wheels are imminent but sadly, I have no idea which ones. If WD wheels are upcoming my wallet will probably go and hide somewhere! Mind you, as Doug says, there are a good few of these running around now and as far as the ones I've seen are concerned, they run OK. Dave does indeed minimise such problems in his design and I'll see how it goes when I get there, but I'm reasonably confident.

LenPinder wrote:OK! I could probably make a good guess, but for the sake of us relative newbies could all more clued up members please be more specific when referring to what are probably life-long acquaintances?


Not a life-long aquaintance Len, but point taken.

I have made a little more progress since I last posted. The photo below shows the top of the tender frames with three fillets soldered in place. I managed to mis-interpret the drawing in the instructions and solder them on the bottom! It didn't take me long to realise my mistake and rectifying it was easy enough. The etch with the hole in it just above these fillets relates to the handbrake shaft.

IMGP0389.JPG


This next photo shows the rear buffer beam and the tender footplate, (well, that's what I call it). The instructions recommend attaching the steps to the buffer beam at this stage as it gets a bit difficult later on. They also tell you to solder the beam onto the rear of the tender frames now and to use the footplate as a guide. You also need to solder some scrap etch, which I double over on itself to get some extra thickness, above the body attachment screw holes on the footplate, then drill and tap them 10BA. Sorry about the ham-fisted scratch marks.

IMGP0419.JPG


Drilling and tapping done, here we see everything screwed together. I had to take a fraction off the front of the footplate etch to get it to sit down level.

IMGP0421.JPG


I also folded up the basic tank etch and tried it in place, as you can see.

IMGP0423.JPG


Lastly, with the footplate screwed in place, I tack soldered the rear buffer beam on, removed the footplate and made a proper solder joint.

IMGP0431.JPG


OK, that's everything up to date, now its off to the Leamington show, where I'll be manning the stand on Sunday, so if you want a chat, just pop along.
The second best priest

User avatar
grovenor-2685
Forum Team
Posts: 3507
Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2008 8:02 pm

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby grovenor-2685 » Sun Mar 08, 2015 7:30 pm

The promise of a blow by blow on the WD has made me get the box down from the loft where it has been patiently waiting for years :)
Looking through the instructions again it does look to outdo Masokits when it comes to the smaller details.
Anyway just one small job remaining on the wokbench before there will be enough room to make a start and follow on behind you.
Regards
Keith
Regards
Keith
Grovenor Sidings

User avatar
Lord Colnago
Posts: 346
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:42 pm

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Mon Mar 09, 2015 4:07 pm

Hi Kieth,

grovenor-2685 wrote:Anyway just one small job remaining on the wokbench before there will be enough room to make a start and follow on behind you.


What with wagon and baseboard building as well as the WD, there's every chance you'll overtake me!
The second best priest

User avatar
grovenor-2685
Forum Team
Posts: 3507
Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2008 8:02 pm

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby grovenor-2685 » Fri Mar 13, 2015 7:02 pm

I have made a little more progress since I last posted. The photo below shows the top of the tender frames with three fillets soldered in place. I managed to mis-interpret the drawing in the instructions and solder them on the bottom! It didn't take me long to realise my mistake and rectifying it was easy enough. The etch with the hole in it just above these fillets relates to the handbrake shaft.

IMGP0389.JPG

Those fillets are incredibly small, it will be my next job. But the immediate question relates to the tender front buffers. Your photo shows them in place, what did you do for springs? So far I have found the usual wagon buffer springs to be to small and Kadee coupler springs to be to big. I think I have some old Studiolith loco bearing springs somewhere, if those don't fit I assume its down to roll your own.
Regards
Keith
Regards
Keith
Grovenor Sidings

User avatar
Lord Colnago
Posts: 346
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:42 pm

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Fri Mar 13, 2015 9:24 pm

grovenor-2685 wrote:Those fillets are incredibly small, it will be my next job. But the immediate question relates to the tender front buffers. Your photo shows them in place, what did you do for springs? So far I have found the usual wagon buffer springs to be to small and Kadee coupler springs to be to big. I think I have some old Studiolith loco bearing springs somewhere, if those don't fit I assume its down to roll your own.


Hi Keith,

The springs are a home brew, made in the same way that Justin Newitt makes his diesel bogie springs. I think they're OK strength-wise, but if they're not and don't work well, I'll fix them permanently. Let's hope it doesn't come to that.

I've been somewhat side-tracked by other things recently but I have managed one or two things in the meantime. one of those was to fit the bearings and spring wires to the bearing straps. I used Exactoscale parallel bearings, which are fractionally smaller than the hole etched in the bearing strap. For consistency, I pushed each one to the base of the hole and soldered them in place. The flow of solder around the bearing was enough in almost every case to fill the gap at the top of the whole. The photo illustrates the finished articles.

IMGP0481.JPG


The other thing I did was to mount the Gibson tender wheels on the Exactoscale conversion axles in order that they will run in parallel bearings. I mounted the wheels on the 2mm. od brass tubes first and then passed the 1mm. dia. steel axle through both tubes. This assembly was then mounted on my Exactoscale back to back gauge. The problem is that you need an equal amount of 1mm. axle showing through on each side. I have made up a jig for ensuring that Exactoscale wagon wheels go on square and I used this, which worked admirably. I should have taken a few photos to show the jigs and the process, but I didn't! What I will do however, is take them next time I make up a set of wheels and explain all then. Apologies for now. The jigs are another of Mr. Newitt's fine ideas and may well feature on his own workbench thread so it might be worth looking there. Anyway, here's a photo of the made up wheels which might help explain what I was going on about when mentioning 2mm. tubes and 1mm. axles.

IMGP0478.JPG


Lastly, a photo showing a trial fit of a wheelset in the tender chassis. Some washers will be required on the 1mm. axles to take out sideplay but that's a job for another day.

IMGP0483.JPG
The second best priest

DougN
Posts: 1095
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 9:57 am

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby DougN » Sat Mar 14, 2015 2:41 am

Good Lord, I am very interested in the running of the tender as I have used Dave's version with coned bearings which I must say does sail through the track work very nicely.....

I think I need to finish the high level chassis that is driving me nuts to get to the j27 which is lazing in its box calling build me!
Doug
Still not doing enough modelling

User avatar
Paul Willis
Forum Team
Posts: 2594
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 6:00 pm

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Paul Willis » Sat Mar 14, 2015 8:37 am

DougN wrote:Good Lord, I am very interested in the running of the tender as I have used Dave's version with coned bearings which I must say does sail through the track work very nicely.....

I think I need to finish the high level chassis that is driving me nuts to get to the j27 which is lazing in its box calling build me!


Which High Level chassis is that then Doug?

Whilst Chris's designs may occasionally call for the skills of a watchmaker and the patience of a saint, I don't recall ever being driven crazy my them. Just my own frustration at my cack-handed skills ;-)

Cheers
Flymo
Beware of Trains - occasional modelling in progress!
www.5522models.co.uk

DougN
Posts: 1095
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 9:57 am

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby DougN » Sat Mar 14, 2015 10:07 pm

Well Flymo, the chassis has gone together well been painted. Now it has been wheeled up... 2 axles quartered and run nicely but the rear driven axle is driving me round the twist. I have a snag in the 3 to 6 o'clock area.... But it is only on one side... I know it is not quartering... GW press saw to that. The chassis was assembled on a chassis2 ed so should no be that... I have opened out the rods as far as I dare... Though that could be the only solution. Then there has been the problem of no brain energy to solve he problem after work! But today the only booking is to watch the national anthem before the melbourne Grand Prix as James is one of the kids inthe Qantas choir! :D ... So it you do watch he will be there!
Doug
Still not doing enough modelling

DougN
Posts: 1095
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 9:57 am

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby DougN » Sun Mar 15, 2015 7:21 am

I can say james Did a grand job. He managed about 5seconds in close up at the end of the anthem. To say we were cheering is an understatement. The boys did a great job. All 13boys from around melbourne the 13 girls from around Australia. So if you see the very start he is there. :D

Proud mum and dad were at home.
Doug
Still not doing enough modelling

User avatar
David Thorpe
Posts: 1007
Joined: Tue Oct 21, 2008 11:13 pm

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby David Thorpe » Sun Mar 15, 2015 9:17 am

Doug, you're not alone in you HL kit travails. I have been quite unable to get my Hudswell Clarke chassis to run properly (and its only an 0-4-0, for goodness sake!) and it has been put back into its box to wait until I have enough time and patience to have another stab at it. Not this year, unlikely next year, probably sometime, possibly never..... Pity, because I've made a really good job of the body.

DT

User avatar
Lord Colnago
Posts: 346
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:42 pm

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Sun Mar 15, 2015 3:52 pm

DougN wrote:Good Lord, I am very interested in the running of the tender as I have used Dave's version with coned bearings which I must say does sail through the track work very nicely.....


Hi Doug,

I have used parallel bearings in one of Dave's other tender kits on my J39 and it runs very nicely. The next job is to get all four axles set up at the same height, although that may need some adjustment when it comes to weight adding time. I set the J39's tender up so that it ran high and once it was weighted it turned out to be just right. Doubt I'll get that lucky twice!
The second best priest

DougN
Posts: 1095
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 9:57 am

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby DougN » Mon Mar 16, 2015 1:17 am

I asked as I have never used the parallel bearings.

The J72 I am battling with is starting to give in. I am trying not to allow too much slop to creep into the chassis but the rods have been seriously opened out. The stiffness has just about gone.... Like I said, about to give in.
Doug
Still not doing enough modelling

User avatar
Horsetan
Posts: 1189
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 9:24 am

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Horsetan » Mon Mar 16, 2015 11:22 am

DougN wrote:NO question is a waste of time. It certainly doesn't help that Dave Bradwell doesn't put his name on the top of the box. :cry: .....


He doesn't need to.

The style of his kits are unmistakable, and the kits speak for themselves.

Also, he's the only one who produces an all-etched "WD"..... :thumb
That would be an ecumenical matter.

LenPinder
Posts: 57
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 8:42 pm

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby LenPinder » Mon Mar 16, 2015 7:08 pm

Horsetan wrote:
DougN wrote:NO question is a waste of time. It certainly doesn't help that Dave Bradwell doesn't put his name on the top of the box. :cry: .....


The style of his kits are unmistakable, and the kits speak for themselves.



:o If you've got one!

Len

User avatar
Andy W
Posts: 877
Joined: Thu May 21, 2009 8:11 am

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Andy W » Mon Mar 16, 2015 10:48 pm

Doug, have you checked your crank pin bushes are consistant in size and the holes are central. Have you tried running the chassis without any bushes? That might show if it could be tight rods that are the problem.
Make Worcestershire great again.
Build a wall along the Herefordshire border and make them pay for it.


Return to “Lord Colnago”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest