From a Loco Works in Norfolk

billbedford
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby billbedford » Mon Jun 01, 2015 8:29 am

Will L wrote:I'm with Philip and I would have thought a sprung chassis would be, if anything, a little more tolerant.


Eccentric wheels is wot springing was invented for......
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Lord Colnago
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Sun Jun 21, 2015 7:40 pm

Time for the latest update. I have now completed the construction of the tender, pretty much as per the instructions but with a departure or two to suit what I want, rather than because there's anything wrong with them!

As usual, I have a few photos to illustrate things, so lets start with this one.

IMGP0592.JPG


Let's start with the front ladder assemblies. These come with a natty jig attached and you also have the choice of a scale version in 5 thou. Despite belonging to the club hammer and chisel brigade, I mis-guidedly opted for the scale version. It wasn't easy using the afore-mentioned tools but I got there in the end and then had a very long lie down! If I ever do another, I won't go down the scale route but I'm pleased that I did and, as In said, I got there in the end. I made certain modifications related to the fitting of a DCC decoder in the tender. I used this method in my J39 but I don't think I covered it, so I'll do so here. I felt that a plug connection between engine and tender would be the most efficient way of connecting the docoder in the tender to the pick-ups on the engine. I have a small stock of 4 pin miniature plugs which came, I think, from RS components, or somewhere similar. Anyway, only two pins are needed and its a simple matter to cut the plugs accordingly. It may well be that you can get two pin plugs but I had none and its a very minor modification. On the J39, I found that one of the pins came loose inside the plug as a result of this cutting up. A little epoxy resin soon restores normality however. I didn't get this problem this time though but its something to be wary of. A rectangular hole needs to be fretted out to a suitable size, somewhere on the tender chassis floor. I chose a spot near the front and to the left of where the universal joint to the motor will be. The picture above shows the plug after fitting and gluing in place, once again with epoxy.

IMGP0601.JPG


Once I had fitted the plug, it became obvious that the etch representing the coal space behind the shovelling plate was in the way and so it had to come out. I thought about making a modification to it but it made my brain hurt so, given that you can't really see it, I removed it completely, as you can see above.

IMGP0608.JPG


Having done that, you also need to cut away part of the tender body floor to get clearance for the plug. The photo above says it better than me.

The next photo shows a very minor alteration I made to the two front uprights on the fire iron "tunnel". As supplied, these have a top section which is designed to be folded over and soldered to the coal space side just like the two at the rear. The prototype didn't have this and Dave notes this in the instructions and asks you to lop the un-necessary bits off. I felt that these were going to be quite vunerable and so I folded then back on themselves and soldered then up. This obviously makes them thicker but it doesn't show from most angles and it beefs them up considerably. You can also see two upright prongs in front of the fire iron tunnel, which are meant to align the fire irons and/or keep them from falling off by allowing the handles to be placed over them. These are simply made up from a u-shaped piece of wire, soldered from below.

IMGP0604.JPG


Finally, here's one of the whole thing, minus wheels, put together as a trial fit, just in case! All was well.

IMGP0615.JPG


Everything then had a thorough clean up, firstly using a cream cleaner, then a general purpose one, followed by a session in the ultra-sonic cleaner. So its clean! I have also primed it as I didn't want it to tarnish whilst I build the loco itself. I used Precision Etch Primer, something I haven't used before. I used the same mix that Ian Rathbone recommends in his painting and lining DVD. He advocates diverting from the instructions, which state that you should use three parts of the supplied thinners to one part of paint. He uses two parts of the supplied thinners, one part cellulose thinners and one part paint. This seemed to spray very nicely and whilst I haven't tried airbrushing the paint according to the instructions, I'm more than happy to go with the recomendation of someone far more experienced in these matters than I am.
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Lord Colnago
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Sun Aug 16, 2015 8:33 pm

Having "rested" for almost two months, I felt it was time to return to the task of building the loco itself. Thus far, I have folded up the inner chassis frames and on the basis that a picture is worth a thousand words, here are a few to show progress so far.

IMGP0637.JPG


The inner frames are capable of being folded to suit P4, EM or OO. To this end, there are half etched fold lines to suit your gauge. I shouldn't have to mention the ones relevant to me, so I won't. What you have to do is tap the frames 10BA and then select the appropriate bending strips, which look like frame spacers, from the fret. These are then held in place with 10BA screws, through the tapped holes, lined up so that an equal amount of the fold line shows on either side and then tack soldered in place. The photo shows the strips in place, awaiting tacking.

IMGP0639.JPG


This one shows how things look after tack soldering the ends of each bending strip.

IMGP0643.JPG


Finally, this shows how things look when folded.

They do say that the camera never lies, but it can tell fibs as I shall explain. Let me start by saying that the frames have ended up square and level in every plane and that all appears well with them now. I made what I now feel was a big error, insofar as I removed the 10BA screws prior to bending up the frames. This is why I think the tacks on two of the bending strips gave way upon bending the first side up. Industrial language ensued to be followed by some careful thought. The saving grace was in the fact that the tacks on one of the bending strips had held and this gave me a datum from which to fold the other side up. I still had to finish the first bend and so I replaced the 10BA screws and re-tacked the offending strips and managed to do so successfully.

I now found that the errant bending strips fouled the half-etched bend line thus preventing me from folding up the opposite side. I was starting to feel like Father Ted hammering out the dent in the car he had been given to raffle! As I said, the saving grace was the one strip that had remained in place. This showed me how much of the half-etch fold line should be showing and so I un-tacked the other strips, removed the screws and began to gently file them back to the point where the same amount of fold line showed when I put them back in place. This done, they were secured with the screws and tacked in place again. I then held my breath and made the other fold. A tweak here and there and, as I said, I have a set of square, level inner frames.

According to the instructions, the frame width should eventually come out at 16.2mm for P4 once the outer frames are in place. I have calculated that mine will come out at 16mm. Just about within the bounds of "getting away with it", which puts me one up on Ted.
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DougN
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby DougN » Sun Aug 16, 2015 9:12 pm

To be perfectly honest. I think you might appreciate the little extra. I have found on the Q6 and both the J27's that i needed a little extra for nicer running in the end.
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Lord Colnago
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Tue Aug 18, 2015 5:21 pm

DougN wrote:To be perfectly honest. I think you might appreciate the little extra. I have found on the Q6 and both the J27's that i needed a little extra for nicer running in the end.


Thanks Doug,

A little extra clearance is always useful, although I found the J39 was fine wandering around Portchullin at Scalefour North. Having said that, its not eight-coupled and doesn't have outside cylinders or Walshaerts valve gear, all firsts for me so it should be fun.

John.
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Horsetan
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Horsetan » Wed Sep 02, 2015 10:21 am

Lord Colnago wrote:....I was starting to feel like Father Ted hammering out the dent in the car he had been given to raffle!....


Image


"Ah, ye're a perfectionist, Ted...."
That would be an ecumenical matter.

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Lord Colnago
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Mon Sep 14, 2015 6:36 pm

Whilst things may have seemed quiet of late, I have not been idle. What I haven't been doing however, is photographing my work as I go. I managed to take the following shots but I could have taken quite a few more, for which apologies. I must be slipping!

We start with a couple of views, sadly slightly out of focus, of the outer frames, duly soldered in place, using wire through the brake hanger holes as alignment aids. This was pretty much as straightforward a procedure as you could wish for. The fun and games was just around the corner!

IMGP0648.JPG


IMGP0646.JPG


The next job was the cylinders. Again, a straightforward exercise in folding, with some castings fitted for good measure. The fun came with the alignment as they have to be aligned in several planes at once and then they can be soldered in place. Viewed from the side, the cylinders are very slightly inclined, something which can be acheived by placing a length of appropriately sized rod through the cylinders and aligning the other end with a mark on the frames just behind the third axlebox. By using a rod through each cylinder, they can be aligned with the frames, to ensure that they are parallel with, and equidistant from, the frames. There are also some webbing etches to be soldered to the frames at the front and rear on each side. Sadly, as mentioned, I didn't take any photographs whilst doing this, so I hope my description suffices. If you need any clarification on any point, please get in touch and I'll do my best to explain further.

This last photo shows the frames, cylinders and footplate assembled together to check that all fits and that the aforementioned alignments are still correct. I did have a small problem insofar as the etched holes for the securing screws at the rear of the footplate didn't align with anything! The penny eventually dropped when, after careful study of the drawings, included with the instructions, I realised that I had soldered a spacer in the wrong place. Once corrected, all was well, as you can see.

IMGP0651.JPG


At this stage, you are advised to check both the horizontal and longditudinal alignments of the smokebox tube on the saddle. There are two alternatives provided for this saddle. One is a very nice lost wax casting, the other is left to the modeller to solder up from the etched pieces supplied with the kit. No prizes for guessing which route I took!

Next comes the coupling rods. I have made them up for one side and, if I get around to it, I'll build those for the other side before Scaleforum. This does seem unlikely however, so post-Scaleforum it will most probably be.
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Thu Oct 08, 2015 6:54 pm

My prediction about when I would get around to building the other set of coupling rods proved correct. My modelling always seems to grind to a halt about a week or so before Scaleforum and I don't seem to get back to the workbench for at least a fortnight afterwards. I don't think its symptomatic of being Society Chairman, but you never know.

I managed to return to it last night. I thought that I would start work on the rods by opening the holes up to crankpin size. My work was interupted by the summons to dine, which turned out to be just about as fortunate as it could get. Descending the stairs, it suddenly occurred to me that the hole I had just been working on was, in fact, the hole for the rivet used to connect two rods together and it goes without saying that I had opened it up way beyond the rivet diameter, if not as much as the crankpin diameter! Well, I would, wouldn't I. Several uncouth phases later, whilst musing over my dinner, a possible solution came to me. As an aside, you will doubtless be pleased to hear that my dinner, at least, found the right hole!

My principle concern was to ensure that whatever solution I adopted maintained the hole for the rivet in a central position, in order to maintain the correct wheelbase. I tried the rivet in various sizes of tube that I had to hand but there was too much play in each one. I then raided my stock of crankpin bushes but these also provided too much play. As a last resort, I tried the rivet in one of those Ultrascale crankpin bushes that's threaded in order to use them where clearance is limited behind cylinders etc. The rivet went into the tube, but only as far as the threaded section. I ran a 0.8mm drill (the rivet diameter) through the tube, which took the merest amount off the threads and the rivet passed right through with no excess play. My luck was holding.

I began to think that my luck was really in when I tried the tube in the over-sized hole that I had inadvertantly opened up and it too fitted nicely with no sideplay. I should mention that these tubes are shouldered and have a "flanged" base. It was the narrow part of the tube which fitted the hole in the rod. This meant that the wider section and flange stood proud of the rear of the rod, which proved an advantage when I came to tidying up the repair, as it allowed a fine piercing saw blade in to cut the excess off without putting the repair under any stress. Anyway, I'm getting ahead of myself. I soldered the bush in place amd made sure that the rivet still passed through and that it was centred on the rod end. All seemed well and so the excesses on both the front and rear were cut off and filed smooth. After making the other three rods up, the whole assembly was tried out on the chassis jig and fitted like a glove.

So, why am I telling you all this. If I'd said nothing, no one would be any the wiser. Or would they. Anyone can make a mistake or have a lapse in concentration and, to be honest, I hadn't even begun to concentrate when I opened up the rivet hole in error. The point is that its not the mistake that counts but how you rectify it. Sometimes its not possible to do so and a cap in hand phone call to the manufacturer for a spare etch is sometimes the only answer. In the worst case scenario, its filed under B. I saw the solution as a challenge. This model will doubtless provide many challenges as I progress, which is one of its principle attractions to me, and one more wasn't going to put me off. I was lucky in so many ways with the solution I adopted, but even if this hadn't been the case, I would have tried my best to solve it. Despite how it may appear when you read construction articles, not everything goes right first time, unless you are one of the talented few for whom I have endless admiration. But I, and I suspect, a great many others are not like that and have to get by with the skills we have and will pick up in the future.

There you have it then, a cock-up sorted out and no harm done. I dare say news of the next one will follow in due course.
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Lord Colnago
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Mon Jan 09, 2017 4:10 pm

Well, its been a long time since the doors to the loco works were last opened. I have been having a serious review of how best to achieve my long term ambitions for the layout, which I won't bore you with here. Suffice to say that what I really need from the works next is a pair of N7 passenger tanks. The only down side to this for me is that the WD will have to remain neglected in the corner for a bit longer.

I have decided to dip my toes in the CSB waters and have found a handy plot for the N7 on the CLAG website. It doesn't show how to deal with the carrying wheels however, only the driving wheels. I'm not sure where to position the anchor points for the carrying wheels. They require a seperate spring wire to that of the drivers due to the difference in axle height. I could place them in a similar manner to how they are done on certain wagon chassis and try different spring ratings to get things just so, but this seems a bit hit and miss to me. All suggestions will be gratefully received, but remember, this is new territory for me, so keep it simple.
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Will L
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Will L » Mon Jan 09, 2017 5:53 pm

I am not personally convinced there is any particular performance advantage in trying to include the radial axle carrying wheels in the CSB, and lot of technician reasons why you might want to avoid trying. So I would build it with a pony truck (that is what the LNER did in the end) and load that with enough weight to ensure it stays firmly on the track, and otherwise ignore it.

If you are really determined to do it right, London Road Models do a radial axle box etch which hopefuls you could modify to go with CSBs (I expect to have a go at this on a couple of F4/5/6s I have to do but I haven't got there yet). Also remember that the prototype had some lateral flexibility on the front driving axle so if your doing it right, so you could try putting the side to side flexibility on the front axle rather than the middle one.

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Lord Colnago
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Mon Jan 09, 2017 8:11 pm

Thanks Will, that's made me think.

I was originally thinking that I might build them as, in effect, 0-8-0s, with sideplay on the leading driver and the carrying wheel. They will have to negotiate a fairly tight curve, 984mm., so I'm not sure if I could get away with that now. Perhaps I need to hear from someone who has experience of building 8-coupled locos that have to negotiate tightish curves. In the meantime, I had better think about designing a suitable pony truck.
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Philip Hall
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Philip Hall » Mon Jan 09, 2017 8:36 pm

On an eight coupled engine my usual way is to have no sideplay on the first and third axle, and sideplay on the second and fourth. This would work on the 0-6-2T, I think. This will often allow progress around a 2'6" or 2'9" curve in P4 with no problem, maybe tighter, depending on the prototype of course. Just don't try and build the chassis too 'tight'.

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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Mon Jan 09, 2017 8:45 pm

Thanks Phil, that's useful info, especially regarding which axles to give more sideplay to. The locos are South East Finecast kits and their chassis aren't usually tight, so I should be OK but I'll keep it in mind.
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Fri Oct 06, 2017 7:56 pm

I haven't updated for some time so a catch up is due. The works haven't been idle since my last post.The N7 is in the paintshop, but getting that far has been a trial, which is understating things. More on that when I finally finish it. I have also been working on a test etch for Justin Newitt but that's for Justin to tell you about, when the time is right. I reviewed the Penbits Class 25 chassis some time ago and, after one abortive attempt, the body is back in the paintshop as we speak. I'll post a picture when its done. I have finally picked up from where I left off with the WD 2-8-0 chassis. The hornblocks, bearings and springs are now in, as is the spring keeper plate. Dave did warn me that putting the springs in and taking them out again would test my sanity and he has proved to be a man of his word and I've only done it twice so far! The next job is to fit the wheels, which means they have to come out again, so it should be fun. Anyway, here's a couple of pictures to show how it all fits together. The little strips of masking tape are there to hold the bearings in the chassis as they can, and do, fall out at every opportunity. Another little test of the sanity.

springs and bearings 1.jpg


sorings and bearings 2.jpg
sorings and bearings 2.jpg (4.81 KiB) Viewed 7605 times


The wagon works have also been busy but I'll post something on that in the appropriate thread, probably in the next day or two.
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Fri Feb 09, 2018 3:52 pm

I've have been puzzling over a slight problem with the WD chassis for a little while now. Other projects have provided ample distraction since I last worked on it but they are, more or less, out of the way now, so I thought that I had better get back to it and try to push it along. If you look at the photos in my posting on the chassis back in October, you will see that the spring wires are suspended differently on the rear two axles than they are for the leading two. The problem that I have been musing over was what gearbox to use. I have several enclosed gearboxes, from different suppliers, which would fit between the rear spring carriers and I had a High Level Road Runner Compact +, which wouldn't, despite being one of the narrowest boxes in the range. I couldn't use any of the former as the input shaft was too high in each case. Bad planning on my part but too late to worry about now.

I decided to have a re-read of the late John Hayes' MRJ article on the subject to see if I could shed any light on the problem. It isn't one of his in depth build articles but one thing that struck me was that he didn't opt for tender drive but put the drive in the loco itself. This set me thinking that if I were to do so, I would solve the drive height part of the problem. I still had to find a gearbox that would fit between the spring hangers, whilst at the same time lift the motor clear of the frames, so that getting the body on and off wouldn't become a nuisance. I have a High Level Highflier in stock and that seems to fit the bill, except that it is too wide to fit between the hangers.

The answer came inadvertantly whilst looking through my box of bits for a suitable gearbox. I have some of the Dave Bradwell designed suspension units for use with Exactoscale springing units, as sold in the Stores. If I replaced the existing hangers with these they would result in a much wider gap between the frames for the gearbox and would utilise the existing bearings, if not the hornblocks, but it proved quite simple to match them up. I had to make a few modifications to the units in order to get them to fit the chassis whilst avoiding frame spacers and the following photos show those mods.

suspension units 1.jpg
suspension units 1.jpg (3.69 KiB) Viewed 7244 times


This shows the units as supplied, bottom, and as modified, upper. The left hand one is modified to fit the rear axle and the other one to fit the third axle. Apart from these modifications, the units were built as per the instructions and I chose to spring from below the axle. You have the choice of above or below, depending on wheel size. I had to opt for the below axle option as spacer positioning precluded anything else. It shouldn't matter a great deal as the WD wheel diameter is fairly close to the point where the below axle option changes to the above axle one.


suspension units 5.jpg
suspension units 5.jpg (2.49 KiB) Viewed 7243 times


I did have to make one further modification to the units used on axle three as it was the devil of a job to get them in position as originally modified. That was as far as I got with things last night. Tonight I'll attempt to solder them into place and carry out some checks to ensure that all is well with the alignment of the hornblocks with the coupling rods. Given that the chassis is being jig constructed, I don't see a problem. Fingers crossed.
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Lord Colnago
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Thu Aug 02, 2018 1:22 pm

Its been a while since I have posted anything so an update seems like a good idea.

Work on the WD continues, although not at the pace I would like. Too many distractions, I'm afraid. The sprung hornblocks that I described in my last posting proved unworkable. I should really have sprung the wheels from above the axles and this has now been done. I'm pleased to say that, after all the self-inflicted trials and tribulations, which I won't inflict upon you, the chassis now runs nice and smoothly.

I have managed to build two other locomotives this year. The first is an N7, destined for my "last great project". I was advised that I should build the loco with the longest wheelbase likely to be used on the layout and to use that to test the track formations. The logic being that if that runs through, so will anything else. This seemed reasonable, hence the rather surprising choice of an N7. I built it, however, as effectively on 0-8-0, which made it the longest wheelbase of any kit I have yet to build. Here's a photo.

IMGP0781.JPG


At Scaleforum last year, I was asked to cover Rob Milliken's layout whist he had lunch and I found myself so taken with his little RSH 0-4-0 tanks that I went over to High Level Models afterwards and bought one. All I can say is that it went together like a dream and runs beautifully. Highly recommended. Here's a photo of it.

IMGP0784.JPG


That's it for now, next time I should be back on the WD.

John.
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Will L
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Will L » Thu Aug 02, 2018 2:08 pm

Lord Colnago wrote:Work on the WD continues, although not at the pace I would like. Too many distractions, I'm afraid. The sprung hornblocks that I described in my last posting proved unworkable. I should really have sprung the wheels from above the axles and this has now been done. I'm pleased to say that, after all the self-inflicted trials and tribulations, which I won't inflict upon you, the chassis now runs nice and smoothly.


I'm afraid that I find the whole Dave Bradwell single axle spring concept a bit of a snare and a delusion, and I do wonder about continuing to offer them through the stores as presumably this implies endorsement. Yes they can be made to work, but there are much easier ways of doing it and I think I'd rather compensate! I do hope that the WD is now nicely CSBd but I do realise this is tricky to do retrospectively and may not be possible without a complete dismantle
At Scaleforum last year,...I found myself so taken with his little RSH 0-4-0 tanks that I went over to High Level Models afterwards and bought one. All I can say is that it went together like a dream and runs beautifully. Highly recommended.

Yes its a very different, and pleasurable, game when you get a kit that really goes together well. I feel the same about my Highlevel Y5

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Lord Colnago
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Thu Aug 02, 2018 3:31 pm

Hi Will,

I don't find the springing units particularly difficult to set up. I have a J68 and a J39 fitted with this springing method and both run very nicely. Setting them up is just a matter of being methodical and making slight adjustments until you get there but it really sounds worse than it is.

Offering them through the Stores merely gives members another option when it comes to chassis building and in no way implies endorsement of any one system over another.

I'm glad to see that you enjoyed building your Y5. If only I could find an excuse to build a few more, they are great fun.
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby DougN » Fri Aug 03, 2018 2:39 am

John seriously nice N7 and RSH. Be careful of the little Highlevel kits they seem to mulitply. I now have 3! when I only started with 1! As Chris's kits go together so nicely. My issue was it was 7quid for postage to Australia for a gearbox and the same if I had a loco as well! So between the Black Hawthorn and RSH.. they are nice to build!

I am interested in your last project... sounds interesting!
Doug
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Lord Colnago
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Mon Sep 10, 2018 4:49 pm

I have been slowly beavering away at the WD since I last posted but modelling time seems to be at a premium at present. Anyway, having achieved a smooth running chassis, I moved on to assemble the brake hanger brackets, the crossheads and slidebars and the connecting rods. I doubt that any further progress will be made this side of Scaleforum but am looking forward to getting on with the valve gear. Here are a couple of photos to illustrate the above-mentioned progress.

20180908_114238.jpg


20180908_114312.jpg


Aploogies for the dark surroundings but I think the relevant things are clear enough.

The cosshead piston rod, (is that what its called?) needs cutting to length and all of the sub-assemblies, the cylinders, motion brackets and slidebars are still seperate assemblies. I need to re-fit the wheels next and check clearances, after which they can all be soldered up into one unit.

More as it comes in.

John.
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Horsetan » Sun Sep 30, 2018 9:29 pm

:thumb
That would be an ecumenical matter.

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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Mon Dec 28, 2020 7:58 pm

For reasons too long-winded to go into, I find myself building a Malcolm Mitchell 4575 class 2-6-2T. I have reached a slight impasse however with the injectors. I can't find a clear enough photo that shows me their correct orientation and although I can "best guess" it, I would rather get it right if I possibly can. The attached photo shows the castings in question. I don't have a drawing with the kit that shows which way round/up they go, which is not to say there wasn't one originally, just that I don't have it. I have looked at a Finney Large Prairie in the hope that the injectors were similar but the castings are different. If anyone can help I would be very grateful.

20201228_194850.jpg
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Dave Holt
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Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Dave Holt » Mon Dec 28, 2020 9:13 pm

I'm no expert on things Western, so I'm happy to be proven wrong, but the castings look to me like standard GWR type which were also adopted by BR as their live steam injectors.
The large part attached to the sprue goes at the bottom and also connects to the overflow pipe. The part on its own at the end, with the right angle pip (nearer the top of the photo), is the delivery clack, which has the pipe to the boiler clacks attached. I would think this end of the injector faces the front of the loco.
At the other end, the two pipes are the steam pipe from the cab control valve, which goes direct into the top of the injector body and the water feed looping round to enter at the bottom.
Hope that helps?
Dave.

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Lord Colnago
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Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:42 pm

Re: From a Loco Works in Norfolk

Postby Lord Colnago » Mon Dec 28, 2020 9:21 pm

Thanks Dave,

That's pretty clear and makes some sense of what I can see in such photos as I have.

Thanks again.

John.
The second best priest


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