Mount Woodville Works

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Armchair Modeller
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby Armchair Modeller » Wed Jan 27, 2016 3:49 pm

Coming along very nicely indeed, Rob :thumb

I particularly like the way you have blended the track into its surroundings. Can't wait to see the final thing.

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Wed Jan 27, 2016 6:02 pm

Thanks Richard…….track cleaning will be fun with all the coal and clay spilled over the tracks……..
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

Terry Bendall
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby Terry Bendall » Fri Jan 29, 2016 9:06 am

That corrugated iron is brilliant Rob. Can you share your methods please?

Terry Bendall

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Fri Jan 29, 2016 5:44 pm

Thanks Terry.
The semi circular roofs started out life as a large Tesco shampoo bottle…pretty rigid 'plastic' which did not need any intermediate bracing. Once cut out the section of bottle was attached to a styrene base and end plates. Because of the nature of the plastic bottle I had to use superglue, Mek or Butanone would not touch it. For the corrugated sheets I used South Eastern Finecast but when ordered I must have clicked the wrong button and ended up with their clear which also didn't accept Mek or Butanone (have since got opaque which does). However, persevered with the clear and superglue. The lower edges of the vertical panels were 'nibbled' with a craft knife.
The sheets were then painted with a mixed coat of cobalt blue, burnt sienna and white. Once dry, sections were picked out using cadmium yellow and overlaid with burnt sienna, followed with a dry brush method using burnt umber. All paint is artists quality acrylic. Bolts or rivets were just painted on. Once all was dry, talcum powder was brushed on with a stiff brush just to tone down the colours.
Rob
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

Terry Bendall
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby Terry Bendall » Mon Feb 01, 2016 9:13 am

Thanks for the details Rob. In my travels to see my sister who lives on the west coast of Wales I have noticed many examples of open barns on farms with a similar semi-circular roof, often in various stages of decay and which would make good prototypes for modelling.

Terry Bendall

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Andy W
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby Andy W » Mon Feb 01, 2016 10:51 am

This type of barn used to be quite numerous - certainly west of the Severn. My dad always referred to them as Dutch barns.
Make Worcestershire great again.
Build a wall along the Herefordshire border and make them pay for it.

dal-t
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby dal-t » Mon Feb 01, 2016 3:25 pm

Possibly not exclusively Welsh. According to Historic England (or whatever this week's name may be for the body that used to be called 'English Heritage'):

"Dutch barns were first built of timber and corrugated iron, and then a mixture of timber, iron and steel frames. They became standardised from the 1880s when firms began to advertise and issue printed details with drawings, usually along with other ‘kit buildings’ such as parish halls."

To illustrate that passage they show a picture which matches very closely Rob's atmospheric 'shed' in form and structure, if not quite in state of delapidation. Personally, what I admire most in Rob's scene is the expert juxtaposition of rounded and ridged rooves - too much model 'built landscape' looks as if it was produced in one piece, on one day, by one 'mega developer' in a form of early Milton Keynesism. Looking around at the real world shows a very different picture of addtions, subtractions, modifications and re-alignments, and it is always good to see that modelled, particularly when it is done so convincingly.
David L-T

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Mon Feb 01, 2016 5:20 pm

Terry Bendall wrote:Thanks for the details Rob. In my travels to see my sister who lives on the west coast of Wales I have noticed many examples of open barns on farms with a similar semi-circular roof, often in various stages of decay and which would make good prototypes for modelling.

Terry Bendall


Could see an increase of sales of Tesco shampoo if the 'barns' get modelled…….. ;) (Other supermarket shampoos are available)
R
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Mon Feb 01, 2016 5:41 pm

dal-t wrote:Personally, what I admire most in Rob's scene is the expert juxtaposition of rounded and ridged rooves - too much model 'built landscape' looks as if it was produced in one piece, on one day, by one 'mega developer' in a form of early Milton Keynesism. Looking around at the real world shows a very different picture of addtions, subtractions, modifications and re-alignments, and it is always good to see that modelled, particularly when it is done so convincingly.

In my 'proper work' (although in semi-retirement) I rely on juxtaposition in its various forms which helps in composition…………the fact that there were so many additions, subtractions etc is what drew me to modelling Mount Woodville Works.

I have been having some PM's with martinm where he pointed out to me the state of the JCB. I admit that I did get carried away with the rust, however, after only 5 years would the rust have been so extensive………most likely not! So after further PM's it has been decided that an early tractor with a 'Heath Robinson' front loader would be more appropriate as I do not wish to have anything 'new' (perhaps another juxtoposition…. ;) ) on set. so…watch this space…...
Lastly…..thank you martinm for pointing that out to me.
Rob
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

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jim s-w
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby jim s-w » Mon Feb 01, 2016 9:14 pm

Good stuff Rob

For your earth moving needs have you thought about something like the Drott Hydraulic Excavator from Langley models?

http://www.langleymodels.co.uk/acatalog ... 21_29.html

HTH

Jim

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David B
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby David B » Mon Feb 01, 2016 10:21 pm

jim s-w wrote:
For your earth moving needs have you thought about something like the Drott Hydraulic Excavator from Langley models?

http://www.langleymodels.co.uk/acatalog ... 21_29.html



The Fordson chaseside hi-lift (early 1950s), further down the page, would fit your 'early tractor . . 'Heath Robinson' ' idea, Rob.

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Tue Feb 02, 2016 7:34 am

jim s-w wrote:Good stuff Rob

For your earth moving needs have you thought about something like the Drott Hydraulic Excavator from Langley models?

http://www.langleymodels.co.uk/acatalog ... 21_29.html

HTH

Jim


Thanks Jim, I'll bear that in mind

David B wrote:
The Fordson chaseside hi-lift (early 1950s), further down the page, would fit your 'early tractor . . 'Heath Robinson' ' idea, Rob.

Thanks David, also to bear in mind.

I have already ordered the Fordson Major E27N and have a few reference photos which shows one fitted with a front loader which I will attempt to make with styrene. If it fails then the rusty remains can be buried in undergrowth and back to your suggestions.
Rob
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Sat Feb 06, 2016 4:54 pm

The tractor kit arrived on Wednesday so this week have been occupied building the kit and then the front loader. The first attempt at the loader was less than satisfactory so was scrapped and a second attempt made which I find acceptable.
The loader was based on photos at http://www.cheffins.co.uk/lot/-552928-machinery-0

tractor01.jpg
tractor01.jpg (95.43 KiB) Viewed 4684 times


The loader was entirely fabricated with styrene sheet and sections.
Just needs a few tweaks and then painting.
Now have a vehicle more appropriate for the eventual condition and era……thanks to martinm for pointing me in an alternative direction.
Rob
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

DougN
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby DougN » Sat Feb 06, 2016 9:40 pm

Rob not going for the ROPS? That is the roll bar at the back. I find the real item interesting as it only has 2 hydraulic Rams to lift and lower the boom. Now there is so much hydraulics on a front end loaders it a main boom lift tilt to the bucket and then the 3in1 bucket which opens and closes. I have not seen a front end loader on any building sites in almost 20years! Every one now tends to use excavators and bobcats. But even this is now changing to posi trax which are bobcats with tracks rather than wheels, they are quicker move powerful and don't make the mess the wheeled versions do! The last big excavator I had was a 36tonne but it was smaller in size than expected!
Doug
Still not doing enough modelling

Terry Bendall
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby Terry Bendall » Sun Feb 07, 2016 9:08 am

DougN wrote:Rob not going for the ROPS? That is the roll bar at the back


I think this would depend on the exact period that Rob is modelling. There is one shown in the picture that Rob used for reference and it would of course be a later addition but I doubt if front loaders would have been fitted with a roll bar or cage in the 1950s for example. Certainly the contractor who lived in the same village as me at that time did not have one.

Terry Bendall

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Sun Feb 07, 2016 5:29 pm

DougN wrote:Rob not going for the ROPS? That is the roll bar at the back. I find the real item interesting as it only has 2 hydraulic Rams to lift and lower the boom. Now there is so much hydraulics on a front end loaders it a main boom lift tilt to the bucket and then the 3in1 bucket which opens and closes.


Hi Doug,
My period is set about '64 - '66 and the earliest requirement (that I could find….someone else may correct me) for ROPS in the UK was 1974. However, to be on the safe side the management of Mount Woodville Works have decided to give their drivers such protection and the fitting shop has fabricated and fitted one.

Hydraulics wise………no luxury of a boom tilt for the bucket, the front loader after all was a 'Heath Robinson' fabrication and the tilt was by means of a lever which released a catch on the bucket (as per my experience with the tractor and front loader we had at the allotments…..also no ROPS!!!). Simplicity was the order of the day………or was it finance….. ;)

DougN wrote: I have not seen a front end loader on any building sites in almost 20years!

How good to be so young!!!!…. ;)
Rob
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

essdee
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby essdee » Sun Feb 07, 2016 5:57 pm

Apart from the exquisite textures and enchanting front-loader attachment of Rob's modelling, I just have to add that, as if Googling for 'Model' etc. was not risky enough itself, then anyone who Googles 'ROPS' and then goes to 'images' will get rather more than they bargained for........

!!

Lovely work Rob, looking forward to seeing all this in - er, - 'the flesh'?

Steve

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martinm
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby martinm » Sun Feb 07, 2016 7:03 pm

Hi there,

My period is set about '64 - '66 and the earliest requirement (that I could find….someone else may correct me) for ROPS in the UK was 1974. However, to be on the safe side the management of Mount Woodville Works have decided to give their drivers such protection and the fitting shop has fabricated and fitted one.


According to the online encycopedia "In 1959, Sweden became the first country to enact ROPS legislation." As Rob says the first UK legislation was not until 1974, the H&SaW Act and it had little immediate impact, especially in the sort of works that is being portrayed. I think the even a 'factory bodge' would be unlikely until the mid 80s.

Looking at the many pics of front loaders on the web, even now many do not have ROPS fitted - it is still not even unusual to see working old tractors without.

A really nice bit of work on the loader!!!!

regards,

martin

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Mon Feb 08, 2016 8:53 am

essdee wrote:Apart from the exquisite textures and enchanting front-loader attachment of Rob's modelling, I just have to add that, as if Googling for 'Model' etc. was not risky enough itself, then anyone who Googles 'ROPS' and then goes to 'images' will get rather more than they bargained for........

!!

Lovely work Rob, looking forward to seeing all this in - er, - 'the flesh'?

Steve


Thanks Steve. in - er, - 'the flesh'?…... :D

Félicien Rops was a Belgian artist producing works that may well be a bit risqué….

martinm wrote:Hi there,
A really nice bit of work on the loader!!!!

regards,

martin


Thanks Martin. But don't look too closely, much is out of square but it has had a hard life.

Rob
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

dal-t
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby dal-t » Mon Feb 08, 2016 9:24 am

RobM wrote:. But don't look too closely, much is out of square but it has had a hard life.

Rob


It looks pretty darn good from here, with the image showing up several times greater than 'life' on my screen - revealing that the additions are significantly crisper than the original castings! But does the plastic come off for the paint shop, or have you also devised a working 4mm scale spray gun to get at that engine block?
David L-T

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Mon Feb 08, 2016 5:08 pm

dal-t wrote:It looks pretty darn good from here, with the image showing up several times greater than 'life' on my screen - revealing that the additions are significantly crisper than the original castings! But does the plastic come off for the paint shop, or have you also devised a working 4mm scale spray gun to get at that engine block?


If you saw a birds eye view you will see what I mean…. :(
No, the plastic bits do not come off, only the rear wheels so 'twas fun painting the engine block et al and yes a couple of bits were knocked loose but soon repaired.
Just need to straighten the steering wheel……...

tractor02.jpg
tractor02.jpg (98.97 KiB) Viewed 4423 times


Artist acrylic paint used throughout.
Time to move on…….
Rob
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

Knuckles
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby Knuckles » Mon Feb 08, 2016 7:08 pm

I'm liking it much. Nice rust bucket at the front...literally.
“He who dares not offend cannot be honest.” Thomas Paine

http://www.shapeways.com/shops/sparksho ... eationsscc
Mostly offering Loco kits & bits in 4mm.
SCC Photon Resin Prints Price list
download/file.php?id=19320

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Tue Feb 09, 2016 5:14 pm

Thanks Knuckles……….

The JCB 3 will be repainted in keeping with its young age and will be delivering coal to the kilns…..couldn't let it go to waste.
R
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

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Noel
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby Noel » Tue Feb 09, 2016 5:30 pm

Rob, you may be interested in this timeline for the JCB3. Unfortunately, the pictures aren't accessible, but the Airfix kit first appeared in 1963, so it's the original production version.

http://www.classicmachinery.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=6833

Noel
Regards
Noel

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Wed Feb 10, 2016 7:57 am

Hi Noel, I found that site, even registered in order to access the images and some good details shown…………as said, my brain did not engage with the timeline when I painted the rust…...would fancy rebuilding it adding the hydraulic hoses and buckets that were not made of 2" thick steel... ;) But that will be in the future as have now returned to getting on with the buildings and getting the track on the left hand baseboard built.
Rob.
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016


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