Mount Woodville Works

A forum for participants in the Standard Gauge Workbench.
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Le Corbusier
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby Le Corbusier » Fri Nov 25, 2016 12:00 pm

That is pretty fantastic weathering Rob
Tim Lee

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Fri Nov 25, 2016 4:57 pm

Thanks Tim, all done with artist's acrylics.
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

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steve howe
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby steve howe » Mon Nov 28, 2016 6:11 pm

The rust effect on the corner plates is superb Rob! :thumb

Steve

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Mon Nov 28, 2016 6:24 pm

Thanks Steve, some use salt for the texture but after a base coat a bit of (uncontrolled) impasto with Burnt Sienna gives the same effect (ish).......... ;)
Rob
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Sun Dec 04, 2016 4:35 pm

A final push this week saw the completion of the chassis and bodies of the remaining 4 wagons. Need a couple of wheel sets and axles when back in stock at C&L. It now begs a loco or two but will have to wait until the new year........

clay_wagons.jpg
3 Complete, 2 awaiting wheels, first test build in far distance. Do need to paint those rails.....
clay_wagons.jpg (85.92 KiB) Viewed 4973 times


No. 6 has been booked in to wagon works (dark wooden building top right) for some repairs
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

Armchair Modeller
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby Armchair Modeller » Sun Dec 04, 2016 6:45 pm

Those wagons look really superb, Rob! :thumb

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Mon Dec 05, 2016 5:12 pm

Thanks Richard....now having to decide what's next......maybe paint some rails!
R
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

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CDGFife
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby CDGFife » Tue Dec 06, 2016 7:23 pm

RobM wrote:now having to decide what's next.....


Show me a layout builder who does not have that problem!!!

It's looking good Rob

CDG

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martinm
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby martinm » Sat Dec 17, 2016 10:25 am

Rob,
The 9" x 48" drain pipes......made from 3.2mm Evergreen tube (closest to 3mm), drilled out then 10 X 80 thou strip glued to one end to represent the socket.

I don't want to spoil your holiday, but whilst researching industrial locos, I came upon the two last pictures on http://www.nuneatonhistory.com/brickyards-quarries--collieries-extractive-industries.html

I'm afraid that it looks as though you might need more and different sizes of pipes (I just hope your pottery wasn't making chimney pots as well :P )

regards,

martin

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Sat Dec 17, 2016 5:30 pm

martinm wrote:Rob,
I don't want to spoil your holiday, but whilst researching industrial locos, I came upon the two last pictures on http://www.nuneatonhistory.com/brickyards-quarries--collieries-extractive-industries.html

I'm afraid that it looks as though you might need more and different sizes of pipes (I just hope your pottery wasn't making chimney pots as well :P )

regards,

martin


Interesting site Martin.....Holidays not spoiled, I have a catalogue from John Knowles which lists 2", 3", 4", 6", 9", 12" and 18" drainage pipes (and chimney pots!!) Have just finished a load of gullies and am currently making up some 6" (ish) pipes (update photo coming shortly). I'm drawing the line on the 2,3 and 4 inch at the moment, would require individual turning, the lathe is in the garage and too cold to get out there. The layout only represents a small part of the works so other sizes could be stored elsewhere. My loading dock has the pipes etc for imminent dispatch.

Interesting to see that the pipes were loaded without any form of packing. I'm currently taking the route of straw packing (1 definite photo exists in the 60's) until anyone can prove otherwise
Rob
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

Lindsay G
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby Lindsay G » Sat Dec 17, 2016 6:04 pm

2:1 in favour of no straw :

Drains.jpg
Drains.jpg (149.48 KiB) Viewed 4571 times

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Noel
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby Noel » Sat Dec 17, 2016 6:18 pm

Rob, have you considered the use open containers for your pipe traffic? They were not uncommon in such traffic from the 1940s into the 1960s, and avoided handling if intended for specific contracts rather than builders merchants stock.
Regards
Noel

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Sat Dec 17, 2016 6:22 pm

Lindsay G wrote:2:1 in favour of no straw :

But when....?....... ;)
R
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Sat Dec 17, 2016 6:26 pm

Noel wrote:Rob, have you considered the use open containers for your pipe traffic? They were not uncommon in such traffic from the 1940s into the 1960s, and avoided handling if intended for specific contracts rather than builders merchants stock.

Noel, I'm open to all suggestions..........methinks that Rule 1 has got to be applied at the moment....... ;)
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

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jon price
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby jon price » Sat Dec 17, 2016 6:51 pm

The Buckley Railway Album, produced by the Buckley Historical Society has a photo which it says depicts trader boxes (which were local to the line and the Buckley pottery industry) still in use after WW2. In fact it shows an open wagon, containing two open containers which would appear to be standard small LNER? open containers. Presumably these were being used to transport Buckley industry output. I can't at the moment find my copy. This discussion http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index. ... ontainers/ on RM web suggests the larger DX containers as produced by Parkside were produced for use with loads such as ceramic pipes. This link http://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/brhodcontainer is to images and measured drawings of the smaller container which was LNER but under BR was called a H (for Hod) carrier, alluding to its use carrying bricks etc.

Armchair Modeller
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby Armchair Modeller » Sat Dec 17, 2016 8:20 pm

Pipes could be made from iron and steel as well as clay. If it is not obvious which type they are in a photo, it could be wrong to make assumptions.

Lindsay G
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby Lindsay G » Sat Dec 17, 2016 9:23 pm

'twas only posted light-heartedly!

Lindsay

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martinm
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby martinm » Sat Dec 17, 2016 9:58 pm

The choice of straw/no straw might just be down to the manufacturer.
The pictures at Slaters in Denby shows pipes loaded on a lorry without straw, obviously the workers weren't concerned about them breaking!
https://plus.google.com/photos/109965569110743332177/album/6151625407752100465/6151626053557261858

A quick peek at the BR rulebook http://www.barrowmoremrg.co.uk/BRBDocuments/Booklet_BR20425_Issue.pdf Instruction 8 doesn't offer any specific advice either.

regards,
martin

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Sun Dec 18, 2016 6:00 am

Noel wrote:Rob, have you considered the use open containers for your pipe traffic? They were not uncommon in such traffic from the 1940s into the 1960s, and avoided handling if intended for specific contracts rather than builders merchants stock.

No, I hadn't......another thing to consider and will need a crane.

jon price wrote:The Buckley Railway Album, produced by the Buckley Historical Society has a photo which it says depicts trader boxes (which were local to the line and the Buckley pottery industry) still in use after WW2. In fact it shows an open wagon, containing two open containers which would appear to be standard small LNER? open containers. Presumably these were being used to transport Buckley industry output. I can't at the moment find my copy. This discussion http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index. ... ontainers/ on RM web suggests the larger DX containers as produced by Parkside were produced for use with loads such as ceramic pipes. This link http://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/brhodcontainer is to images and measured drawings of the smaller container which was LNER but under BR was called a H (for Hod) carrier, alluding to its use carrying bricks etc.


Thanks Jon, the containers and drawings from Paul Bartlett's site look to be in keeping. Another consideration......

Lindsay G wrote:'twas only posted light-heartedly!

Lindsay

And taken as such..... :thumb

martinm wrote:The choice of straw/no straw might just be down to the manufacturer.
The pictures at Slaters in Denby shows pipes loaded on a lorry without straw, obviously the workers weren't concerned about them breaking!
https://plus.google.com/photos/109965569110743332177/album/6151625407752100465/6151626053557261858

A quick peek at the BR rulebook http://www.barrowmoremrg.co.uk/BRBDocuments/Booklet_BR20425_Issue.pdf Instruction 8 doesn't offer any specific advice either.

regards,
martin


Loads of interesting photos of the Denby site.
The photos and video I have seen show no straw when loaded on lorries. It seems 50/50 when loaded on railway wagons.
On the John Knowles catalogue/leaflet it states "Breakages in transit at receivers risk".

Thanks to all for your inputs, much appreciated.
Rob
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Wed Dec 21, 2016 4:13 pm

A couple of photos before the Christmas break.......

pipesandgullies.jpg
Pipe loading dock
pipesandgullies.jpg (84.78 KiB) Viewed 4375 times


cuppa.jpg
Tea break
cuppa.jpg (99.59 KiB) Viewed 4375 times


R
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

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Le Corbusier
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby Le Corbusier » Wed Dec 21, 2016 5:21 pm

RobM wrote:A couple of photos before the Christmas break.......

pipesandgullies.jpg

cuppa.jpg

R

Love the gnarly bottom to the doors

Tim
Tim Lee

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Sat Jan 14, 2017 5:40 pm

I've not been idle......Work continues on the various buildings which are to be completed. Finally got the open spoke wheels from C&L plus some 1mm silver steel for axles, so the final 2 clay wagons are complete. The last of the Das has been laid and now working from the back of the layout to the front.
Inside the dilapidated building at the rear of the pipe mill is a conveyor belt, just visible in the first photo, which takes the clay to the crusher then into the ('scuse the non technical terms) giant mixer and water added to be formed into a malleable clay.
The prototype wagon is now just a poser and seen here posing as it tips at the rear of the pipe mill.

wagon-tipping.jpg
wagon-tipping.jpg (177.01 KiB) Viewed 4167 times


In the book it states that the tipping wagons were propelled into a stop on the rail which caused it to tip, dropping the rear axle as it came to a sudden halt. Personally I think it was manually tipped, coming to a sudden stop and dropping the axle, in my understanding of physics the momentum of the dropped axle would cause it to collide with the front axle. Anyway, I have modelled the original photo.
Soon will have to place an order for a couple of locos.......
R
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

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steve howe
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby steve howe » Sun Jan 15, 2017 6:17 pm

RobM wrote:Soon will have to place an order for a couple of locos.......
R


Not RSH saddletanks by any chance......? ;)

Steve

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RobM
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby RobM » Mon Jan 16, 2017 7:02 am

Well that sounds like a good idea Steve..... :D Am also considering a Judith Edge Ruston & Hornsby 48DS.
With salt and soot laden air plenty of scope for rust.....
Rob
http://www.robmilliken.co.uk
Updated December 2016

Armchair Modeller
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Re: Mount Woodville Works

Postby Armchair Modeller » Tue Jan 17, 2017 2:41 pm

RobM wrote:Well that sounds like a good idea Steve..... :D Am also considering a Judith Edge Ruston & Hornsby 48DS.
With salt and soot laden air plenty of scope for rust.....
Rob


Small diesel shunters are a good choice - very atmospheric and they cry out for customisation and weathering.

Big diesels are pretty boring, but the small ones have a special fascination all of their own. ;)


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