An Inglenook in P4

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steve howe
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An Inglenook in P4

Postby steve howe » Mon Jun 02, 2014 10:09 pm

Horsley Lane Goods

Introduction
Many of us will be familiar with the Inglenook concept; a shunting puzzle relying on deliberately restricted sidings with the objective of making up a train of five wagons out of a possible eight in an order dictated by a random choice of cards. The concept has been around for a long time and those wishing to delve more into its history and numerous permutations are recommended to the 'official' Inglenook website: http://www.wymann.info/ShuntingPuzzles/sw-inglenook.html

My involvement in the Inglenook concept came about some years ago through being asked to 'knock up' a hands-on exhibit for our next Club exhibition in response to comments about not having enough 'interactive' exhibits for the young ones to play with... so we built a 'text book' Inglenook on a piece of 4' x 1' board using Peco track and a selection of suitably visually distinctive wagons with a well-behaved Bachmann pannier to push them around. I photographed the wagons and produced them onto laminated cards along with a suitably doctored controller to ensure that visitors only drove at a sedate pace. I have to admit to a certain amount of scepticism of the project but in fact it was remarkably popular, the biggest problem was keeping the grown-ups off it long enough to allow Junior to finish the puzzle! In a quiet moment I had a go myself and found it strangely addictive, sometimes the problem could be solved in a few minutes, other times it could take a head-scratching half hour or so. It was then the idea began to form that the scheme might translate into P4 with all the controllability and discreet coupling potential and overall realism that that standard could bring.

The original and 'true' Inglenook was a fan contained within 4 feet, with the longest siding holding 5 wagons and the shorter 3, leaving one empty siding and the headshunt for shunting and I wanted to try to stay as close to the original concept as possible. Playing around with some paper templates and wagons soon showed that the scale length of a reasonably realistic turnout (a B6) would not allow the optimum siding lengths to be achieved. By telescoping the points into a tandem, it became more feasible and with a little juggling, the scheme would fit. I wanted to create a worthwhile model as well as an interesting puzzle, so I continued the industrial theme of 'Horsley Bank' my previous minimum space opus set in the immediate pre-War 2 West Riding. Urban subjects lend themselves to compact layouts with the tracks hemmed in by retaining walls, tall buildings and bridges and by using the device of an overbridge at each end disguising the ends of the sidings, the illusion of a glimpse of what should really be a much larger scene can be maintained.

While the idea for the layout was crystalising, I happened to mention what I was doing to one Bendall, T who immediately booked it for Scaleforum as a 'work in progress'. At that time the thing was not even at bare baseboard stage. Work was painfully slow with numerous other non-modelling commitments impacting on progress, but I eventually, over one Christmas holiday, managed to get the tandem turnout completed, and with the plan drawn up full-scale the idea began to take form.

So with a little over three months to go, I thought I might record progress (or lack of it) and some trials and tribulations as the scheme fumbles forwards. The layout was, and is, always intended as an experiment, not just in minimal space modelling, but (for me) breaking new ground in DCC control, Alex Jackson couplings, glued trackwork, and better rolling stock. Although I've been playing around in P4 for over 30 years, taking a 'back to basics' approach can make for a refreshing change.

1.JPG
The plan full size


The basic scheme is an urban scene between two road bridges with a siding serving a general goods warehouse, another running to a cobbled yard, possibly for coal or building materials, with the middle road continuing 'off scene' under the bridge. All three sidings disappear beneath the road bridge suggesting they continue for some distance. The scene is framed by very ordinary buildings typical of the West Riding; a corner pub on the bridge, part of a mill with its boiler house, and a large three storey warehouse with a loading platform and entry at street level above. I have an interest in (though not much knowledge of) the old L&Y having lived in the Upper Calder valley for some years, and the construction of a large warehouse with the distinctive white on black lettering painted across its façade was one of the early design features of the scene.

Hopefully regular updates to follow!

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steamraiser
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby steamraiser » Mon Jun 02, 2014 10:59 pm

I will be watching with interest.

Gordon A
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Terry Bendall
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby Terry Bendall » Tue Jun 03, 2014 6:40 am

Having talked to Steve at RailEx about progress I hope that he makes sufficient progress to bring the layout to Scaleforum. Those who have seen Horsley Bank will know what Steve has achieved in the past and I am sure the latest project will be just as good.

Of course if things don't come together sufficiently for this year, there is always 2015. :D

Terry Bendall

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Ian Everett
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby Ian Everett » Tue Jun 03, 2014 10:41 am

Steve,

well done for bravely sticking your head above the parapet - always dangerous when Terry is on the prowl

Welcome to the Workbench. I look forward to seeing your progress - which will be much enhanced by the pressure of a deadline...

Ian

P.S. Did you realise that the bridge and wall infrastructure on Clecklewyke was based on the same inspiration as your Horsley Bank - Halifax North Bridge?

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steve howe
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby steve howe » Thu Jun 05, 2014 10:26 pm

The Hard Stuff

I feel a bit of a fraud describing this project here because it is so basic, but, as the man said "I've started so I'll finish...." The overall dimensions of the layout finished up at 1220mm x 330mm (4' x 13" in real money) I decided to abandon the curved frontage as it made unnecessary complications and contributed nothing other than add a bit more landscape to the overall scene. The plan is to display the model on a set of bookshelves and the widest shelf that fits the average shelving system is about 14" so the scheme was pared down to suit.

2.JPG

3.JPG

4.JPG

Nothing new to say about the baseboard - 9mm ply on 25 x 50 softwood frame, took all of half an hour to construct. I added the refinement of adjustable feet to the frame with the idea of playing trains on the kitchen table. If the layout is ever exhibited seriously :lol: I will probably make a mini-subframe which will stand on a table and bring the scene up to nearer eye-level.

5.JPG

The tandem turnout ready for testing. It was built entirely traditionally with rivet and ply and steel rail which I still think gives superior electrical continuity despite the problems with stray flux causing rusting. Washing the finished piece is easy enough before its laid, but how do you wash flux off after everything's stuck in place?

9.JPG

The turnout set in position, the underlay is a dense foam sheet about 3mm thick which I came my way as packing, but I think it is virtually the same stuff that Exactoscale (and now C&L presumably) used to sell as underlay. As the layout is all about experiment I gave it a go as a change from the traditional cork and it seems to be working very nicely.

16.JPG

I think a simple jig makes plain track so much easier and less tedious, this is just card strips of the appropriate width stuck to a half-meter length of melamine and liberally shellacked to prolong its life.

17.JPG

Clamping the first few sleepers while the solvent sets helps stop things moving about when positioning the rest of the chairs.

8.JPG

Burning the midnight oil.....

14.JPG

15.JPG

In the cold light of day, the track fairy has been and laid a few sidings. These were all made by the glued-chairs-to-ply system which was new ground for me but I like very much - at least for plain track, if nothing else it alleviates the glorious job of sticking all those half chairs on afterwards...

Point control next....
You can't wait can you?

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grovenor-2685
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby grovenor-2685 » Fri Jun 06, 2014 7:53 am

but how do you wash flux off after everything's stuck in place?
I always use non-corrosive flux for any soldering needed after laying then cleaning is not a significant problem. Almost always ordinary rosin core electrical solder does the job, on the odd occasion when it doesn't I use flux I have for printed circuit board rework.
Keith
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Keith
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steve howe
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby steve howe » Fri Jun 06, 2014 8:17 am

I tried Carr's Orange Lable which claims to be non-corrosive but found it pretty useless, I was recommended to try La-Co as it is also said to be less active, but it still attacks steel. I scrub everything as much as possible with warm water and detergent with an old hog brush, and dry quickly afterwards but corrosion still seems to creep in. I'd be interested to know what make of PCB flux you use Keith?

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Serjt-Dave
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby Serjt-Dave » Fri Jun 06, 2014 11:57 am

Wire Brush and Dettol! Oh no that's for something else. I try and do as much soldering {i.e. connecting wires, tie bar brackets etc} before fixing the rail down and use a glass-fibre brush to clean up the solder joint. It takes a bit of forward planning but I find it works well in the long run. You can't do it all but it's minimises the risk of unwanted rust.

Dave

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Tim V
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby Tim V » Fri Jun 06, 2014 3:14 pm

I have found with steel rail that a wipe with lighter fluid removes the grease from the rail. Then a rub with a track cleaning rubber or fibre glass pencil. Then a further wipe with lighter fluid to get rid of the dirt you've created!. Then ordinary electrical solder (leaded) with its own flux is enough.
Tim V
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steve howe
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby steve howe » Tue Jun 24, 2014 4:11 pm

Point control and some infrastructure

The recent fine weather has pushed railway modelling to the bottom of the list again, but some progress has been made on the Plank, another delaying factor has been fitting (and fretting) with a batch of AJ couplings - more anon - the Jury's still out.....

In the interests of keeping this project as simple and basic as possible, point control does not come much more basic than this!
11.JPG
CBE (Crude But Effective)


13.JPG


Nothing of any consequence to say really, the stretcher bars are Masokits which, once you get the hang of assembling them make up into quite a robust unit, I like the fold up etched tabs which hold the switch rails at the correct distance and slide under the stock rail to stop the switch rising up. One observation I would make is to rigorously test each unit for electrical insulation before fitting, and I found using a Dinky hairclip when soldering the blades to the tabs took some of the fraughtness out of the etches becoming unsoldered through excess heat.
10.JPG
Masokits stretcher bars, crude soldering hopefully to be disguised by Art...


I see no point in elaborate control panels on a layout where the pointwork is all within arm's length and on a shunting yard it seems more appropriate to have the point control in proximity to the turnout. Linkage is a 0.5mm brass wire in Merco tube soldered to a Gem Omega loop inserted through a hole drilled in the slider switch, all eloquently described by our illustrious President in his 'Approach to Building Finescale Track' If I were doing this method again (and it is very reliable) I would probably use a finer omega loop as the Gem product is a bit stiff for our delicate tolerances!


The basic formwork for the scenery is corrugated board - cheap (i.e. free) easy to work and light. For the foundations of walls and road or platform surfaces I use greyboard obtainable from Art shops in varying thicknesses, Mountboard would do just as well but is pricier.
DSC_0156.JPG
Scenic profiles and the roadway down to the yard


DSC_0165.JPG
Basic profiles and the approach road down to the yard


The profiles will get covered by a lattice of card strips followed by a layer of Mod-Roc..... however the sun is shining and the board needs waxing (and I'm not talking about the baseboard 8-)

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Tim V
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby Tim V » Tue Jun 24, 2014 4:26 pm

Not sure about using Omega loops to reduce the throw of those switches. I think it's a recipe for broken stretchers.

I used basic plastic cranks I'd cut from 60thou, with drillings to reduce the throw.
Tim V
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steve howe
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby steve howe » Mon Jul 07, 2014 9:40 pm

The bank begins to take form,
bank2.JPG


yes, those strips are old cornflake packet, we'll be out with the stickybacked plastic and wire coathangers in due course ;)
bank3.jpg


bank4.jpg


bank7.jpg
The rather elegant Ben Nicholson sculpture on the bridge will be clad in brick to represent the wing-wall of a factory gate off-stage.

This is an old but very effective method for making miniature scenery, promoted I believe by Jack Kine, those of us of a certain age may remember his hilarious animated models on Michael Bentine's TV show.


DSC_0166.JPG

The smaller of the two bridges gets its abutment cladding, I've been experimenting with making stone sheets that are receptive to watercolour, more to follow in a day or two.

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steve howe
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby steve howe » Tue Jul 08, 2014 5:08 pm

Making a Good Impression

My preferred method for buildings and other architectural features uses good quality white card, embossed to represent stone or brick etc. and coloured using artists watercolours, a technique often referred to as the 'Pendon Method' and indeed I've used it for many years from spending formative time with Roye England when Pendon was still a rather eclectic ideal which no one ever expected to see finished!

The technique works (for me) because I prefer to use 'natural' materials like card, wood and paper as they seem to have a more subtle surface than plastic, although I would be the first to agree there are times when plastic sheet is indispensable. They also seem to 'age' nicely as the model matures. The main drawback with this technique is it is really only suitable for relatively flat surfaces, and the massive masonry of retaining walls, viaducts and the like requires something with more textural relief. This suggests a carving process into a suitably thick substrate like plaster or modelling clay, and if there is a lot of walling to do this can be a tedious, not to say wrist aching process. I needed a quicker way to make heavy walling for this and other projects so cast around for an alternative. Given that I wanted a material to take watercolour, ready-made plastic sheet was out, but the Slaters 7mm Dressed Stone and Cotswold Stone sheets seemed to offer potential from the textural point of view. When living in West Yorkshire I was struck many times when travelling by train by how massive the stones were in the railway civil engineering features, particularly retaining walls where some blocks measure over 5' long and 2' high. The Slaters sheet is I believe not quite the correct bond for West Yorkshire walls which seem to have been laid in a more random pattern rather than the regular coursing of the vac-formed sheet, but the hewn texture of the stones looked pretty convincing and I set about looking to find a way of reproducing it in a more sympathetic material. After various experiments I think the method is getting somewhere near and I have made a few examples for this project. The Slaters Dressed Stone has been used for retaining walls where the size of the blocks is more acceptable, with the smaller Cotswold Stone for lighter features such as bridge abutments.

A brief survey of the process follows:

1.JPG
The sheet is first stuck to a sheet of glass with spray adhesive


2.JPG
A frame of 10mm x 20mm timber is arranged to make a fence and Plaster of Paris poured to fill the mould


3.JPG
The completed mould released from the frame


5.JPG
Das modelling clay is worked in the hands to a rough rectangle


6a.JPG
The clay is rolled out on a clean cloth using 2mm card battens to achieve an even sheet


6.JPG


7.JPG
The mould is checked for size and lightly pressed into the clay sheet


8.JPG
The sheet is flipped over and the cloth removed, the clay sheet is further rolled firmly onto the mould


9.JPG
Surplus clay is trimmed by the resident Ghost


10.JPG
The impression and the mould seperated


DSC_0162.JPG
When dry, the edges of the corners require mitreing to fit, the clay is easy to work with a coarse file but the thin edges are fragile and some additional filling may be needed


DSC_0161.JPG
It all looks a bit crude at this stage but have faith...


DSC_0167.JPG
Abutments in place on the single-track bridge, final filling and fettling to do before painting


bridge3.jpg
The bridge painted but awaiting final weathering


bridge4.jpg
The stonework for one of the second bridge abutments


wet2.jpg
The larger rough hewn stone used on a retaining wall


wet1.jpg
Working with the sheet in a half-damp state allows it to be moulded to make curves


I have also used the process for making cobbles which I will post later. The method is really only suitable for 'heavy' structures like walls, I think it would be difficult to use for actual buildings, although the dry sheet is very easy to cut with a sharp scalpel. The main disadvantages (apart from the time involved making the moulds) are:

Its messy, especially filing the mitres for the corners
The thickness of the sheets (about 2mm) means you have to make allowance in any base carcass
Filling and fettling is needed to make corners neat

The advantages are:

Its cheap and flexible for a variety of installations
It can be manufactured in quantity if you have miles of walling to do
It can be coloured with water-based paints
The surface finish resembles card and so has a natural texture
It can be assembled with PVA
The sheet can be used dry for flat surfaces or damp for curves and undulations

So there we have it!
Attachments
wall5.jpg
A set of piers during painting, the RH one has had some weathering, LH is still raw
Last edited by steve howe on Tue Jul 08, 2014 8:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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grovenor-2685
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby grovenor-2685 » Tue Jul 08, 2014 8:04 pm

I'd be interested to know what make of PCB flux you use Keith?

I have used this, which I have available for its intended purpose, http://www.rapidonline.com/tools-equipment/smd-rework-jelly-and-solder-pack-60029 but as mentioned I very rarely need added flux, the rosin cored solder usually works by itself.
Keith
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Keith
Grovenor Sidings

Terry Bendall
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby Terry Bendall » Wed Jul 09, 2014 8:16 am

steve howe wrote:yes, those strips are old cornflake packet,


Nothing wrong with that. :) It is good quality for what it is and you have already paid for it once! I have used it for making mock-ups of buildings when planning.

steve howe wrote:The method is really only suitable for 'heavy' structures like walls,


None the less it looks very impressive Steve. Looks like you will be well set up for Scaleforum in September.

Terry Bendall

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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby beachboy » Wed Jul 09, 2014 8:39 am

Steve,

The T Nuts used for the base legs may need watching as their grip into soft wood is far from permanent. In the past I have had to drill and pin them, or overlap with countersunk screws. Otherwise, a leg may detach which cannot always be seen.

How have you glued the wood sleepers to the foam, without loosing a foam base property by becoming a glued solid for sound transit for which the ply sheet may well happily amplify, much like the sound box of a violin.

Thanks for sharing your ideas, particularly on the scenic side. Das clay does have the porous surface to replicate bricks & stone, which as you say paints well with thinned paints, particularly water based for soaking into the clay. Though does not water colour require more coats to produce a richer colour tone. The terracotta Das may sometimes have an advantage.
Your 'casting' method for say two Wills sheets, may perhaps produce a more workable method of hiding, or sculpting the join.
Possibly - sounds good.

Steve.

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4307
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby 4307 » Wed Jul 09, 2014 10:47 am

steve howe wrote:Making a Good Impression

My preferred method for buildings and other architectural features uses good quality white card, embossed to represent stone or brick etc. and coloured using artists watercolours, a technique often referred to as the 'Pendon Method' and indeed I've used it for many years from spending formative time with Roye England when Pendon was still a rather eclectic ideal which no one ever expected to see finished!



And what a result! Very impressive! And thank you for posting clear step-by-step photos.
Dave Harvey

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steve howe
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby steve howe » Wed Jul 09, 2014 4:04 pm

How have you glued the wood sleepers to the foam, without loosing a foam base property by becoming a glued solid for sound transit for which the ply sheet may well happily amplify, much like the sound box of a violin.

I used Copydex :o I know it has drawbacks, most notably its tendency to wind itself around drill bits, but applied sparingly to the sleepers before laying (i.e not blathering a thick layer onto the underlay first) it maintains a nice resilience. I've not really tested the sound absorbancy on this layout much to say if it makes any appreciable difference, one thing I have noticed however is the short section of track laid on soldered copperclad which will be eventually hidden under setts, is noticeably quieter than the ply stuff!

Though does not water colour require more coats to produce a richer colour tone.

The DAS is slightly less receptive to watercolour than card or paper but I find the addition of a little white will make the colour more opaque without neccesarily lightening the tone. Or you could use gouache which is pretty opaque.

Your 'casting' method for say two Wills sheets, may perhaps produce a more workable method of hiding, or sculpting the join.

I've been doing just that for cobbles - watch this space! ;)

Steve

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steve howe
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby steve howe » Fri Jul 18, 2014 9:01 pm

The Joy of Setts

I have been looking at making setts (or cobbles depending on which end of the country you hail from) using the moulded DAS method described earlier. I rather like inset track on quaysides, yards etc. and planned a tiny corner of a cobbled yard for this project. Having made setts over the years using various methods centred around scribing in situ using plaster, Polyfilla, card and fireclay (never again!) I found the process to be tedious and wrist aching, with all the attendant dust, stiff neck, aching back, sore fingers etc. etc. So I've developed a method broadly similar to the walling described earlier and which may be of interest to those with a more than passing interest in setts..

The mould uses the Wills sheet as its basis.

set1.JPG
The sheet as bought


As bought the sheets are all identical with a kerb moulded in on two edges. It was quite common (at least in West Yorkshire) to divide large areas of setts into blocks with a grid of kerbs creating drainage channels. To make a worthwhile sized sheet, I joined the four pieces together placing the kerbs in a double row to suggest these channels. This required trimming off the moulded kerbs and re-assembling them.

set2.JPG
Trimming the sheets


set3.JPG
The four sheets re-assembled


The setup for casting was exactly the same as described earlier for walling.

set4.JPG
The setup for casting


And the rolling and pressing process results in a faithful reproduction. Here the sheet has been cut whilst still in a state potters call 'leather hard' i.e stiff but still damp and flexible.

set6.jpg
The cast and a moulded sheet


set7.jpg
The sheet laid in place using the kerbs to edge the rails


Any undulations or inaccuracies can be smoothed out at this stage with a modelling tool and a wet paintbrush, adding more clay as needed to fill any gaps.

set9.jpg
Using a steel ruler to mould the clay against the rail


A thin steel edge is useful for getting a neat flangeway against the inside rail.

set10.jpg
The sheet in place and drying


set11.jpg


The DAS is quite forgiving but I found it will shrink slightly on drying. With hindsight I should have glued the edges of the kerbs to their respective sheets so that the shrinkage took place between them, thus enhancing the effect of a drain, my sheets shrank in various places, but the subsequent stages saved the day.

set12.JPG
A sample for colouring test


When dry the DAS was tinted with watercolour. The mix here was raw sienna with a little ivory black and some white (charcoal grey seems unobtainable in W&N's range these days) The mix was made slightly richer than intended for reasons that will become apparent.

set12a.JPG
Using Polyfilla as a grout


The plastic moulded setts show heavy relief and a 4mm toe would disappear between them if one stepped out of one's clogs, so Polyfilla was rubbed into the surface to both fill the joins and suggest mortar.

set13.JPG
The grouted surface still dry


I used Polyfilla because it has a built-in adhesive which meant it should not crack once set, and also because the slightly coarse texture gave a nice 'stony' effect.

set14.JPG
The surface well wetted


The surface was well wetted, I used a soft brush and a quick hand, but for larger areas a spray would be better to avoid risking disturbing the paint surface.

set15.JPG
The grouting after drying


Light weathering using Humbrol matt dark earth and matt black well diluted with white spirit gave a suitably worn appearance.

set16.JPG
After weathering


set17.JPG
The yard in process of colouring


set18.jpg
The depth of relief in the moulded setts is quite apparent after colouring


The yard setts were finally weathered and the rail edges checked for clearance. The slight disadvantage with DAS is that the colour lies only on the surface and does not penetrate, thus any subsequent track cleaning can remove colour from the edges of the setts. Careful use of the track cleaning tool is called for.

set19.jpg
Following weathering


set20.jpg
The approach road to the yard after weathering


The approach road down to the yard following weathering and awaiting the periphery grass and weeds and boundary wall.

It may seem a lot of trouble to go to for a small area which could, perhaps justifiably be done by other methods, but I have other projects in mind where the moulds will be used, and once the plaster casts have been made, the production process is very quick and painless.
Last edited by steve howe on Sat Jul 19, 2014 8:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.

David Knight
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby David Knight » Sat Jul 19, 2014 1:47 am

Very interesting indeed Steve. I've had the same problems with track cleaning and inset track (my cobbles were plastic). Is it possible to pre-colour the DAS with powdered pigment or something similar?

Cheers,

David

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Andy W
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby Andy W » Sat Jul 19, 2014 11:18 am

Really interesting, thanks for sharing.
Make Worcestershire great again.
Build a wall along the Herefordshire border and make them pay for it.

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steve howe
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby steve howe » Tue Aug 19, 2014 9:53 pm

A brief update for now, the fine weather has impacted somewhat on progress (well that's my excuse) and I have been spending quite a bit of time making up Dingham couplings for a set of wagons, the set with AJ's are following rather more slowly :roll: But I have managed to get the backscene in place along with the sides and top frame to contain the view. The box structure is 4mm ply fixed permanently to the baseboard, the lighting pelmet is detachable to allow work on the layout, in practice the viewing slot will be only about 9" high to constrain the sightlines as much as possible. The backscene is a suitably gloomy skyscape downloaded from an internet site and printed on fine canvas by large-format inkjet. I'm very fortunate to have access to one of these machines through work, but many high street print bureaus now offer this service. The back corners were curved in an effort to lose the 'corner in the sky' effect although not much of it will be visible when the buildings are in place.
bacscene1.JPG
The backscene in place


These views show progress on colouring the DAS walling discussed earlier. Watercolour paint is used - yellow ochre; raw umber; raw sienna; ivory black and white are the main colours.
wallpainting1.JPG
Wall painting in progress


Weathering is done using well thinned matt dark earth and black run into the mortar courses and allowed to run down the wall as rain would do. Thinned light green paint was introduced around the wall base to suggest damp and mould.
bank 11.JPG
The wall in place


Ballasting is being done with Carrs Ash ballast, I've not used these before and am finding them easy to apply with no dust and receptive to liquid adhesive, I use Johnson's Kleer floor polish applied with a dropper which sets the ballast nicely without the gumminess associated with PVA. The Kleer darkens the colour of the ballast, but extensive weathering should result in a good texture.
bank 10.JPG
Ballasting underway


More on buildings follows soon....

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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby Brinkly » Tue Aug 19, 2014 10:44 pm

Looks very nice Steve. I've only just found your thread, but I will certainly follow it with interest from now on.

Kind regards,

Nick.

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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby Terry Bendall » Wed Aug 20, 2014 7:11 am

Steve will be at Scaleforum and those who are able to come will be able to see his work and find out more about the techniques used.

Terry Bendall

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Noel
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Re: An Inglenook in P4

Postby Noel » Wed Aug 20, 2014 10:12 am

I'm a bit concerned about the suggestion of a 9" viewing slot on a layout at a public exhibition. As a device for limiting lines of sight for a single viewer at an art exhibition such a narrow aperture might be acceptable, but I feel that at a busy model railway exhibition it is likely to make the layout effectively unviewable for many people. Where such slots are used they have to be set at an 'average' eye height [or that of the builder], and make taller people crouch to view through the slot, which is not at all comfortable as one gets older :twisted:. Shorter viewers, including those in wheelchairs, have no chance at all. What a layout builder does, and how, is up to him or her, but I would suggest that if they invite such a layout then the organisers have a responsibility to ensure that it is accessible to all attending...

Noel
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Noel


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