Search found 35 matches

by ICollett
Sat Mar 22, 2014 9:23 am
Forum: Tools and Techniques
Topic: Rivet forming press
Replies: 15
Views: 8972

Re: Rivet forming press

The issue of the backlash has been addressed by the simple solution of increasing the pressure on the thrust washer behind the handle - working properly again now. Currently collecting together the dimensions for W Irons and Brake Gear for placement of the rivets along the 9' wheelbase, 16' over hea...
by ICollett
Fri Mar 21, 2014 10:10 pm
Forum: Tools and Techniques
Topic: Rivet forming press
Replies: 15
Views: 8972

Re: Rivet forming press

As suspected the styrene jig was not particularly suitable, although the design was proved. Rebuilt in brass, a 30thou card strip 2.3mmm goes into the channel and I think I now have the punch depth set. The Stop Screw needed to the reversed to make it longer - the jig and channel raises the work sur...
by ICollett
Wed Mar 12, 2014 12:15 am
Forum: Tools and Techniques
Topic: Rivet forming press
Replies: 15
Views: 8972

Re: Rivet forming press

I have just taken delivery of my GW Models Rivet Press and, although this is very early days, am entirely delighted. Still experimenting with lever impact levels etc, but the work table is a joy, one whole revolution for 1mm between rivets and all in a perfect straight line - fantastic. Of course as...
by ICollett
Tue Mar 11, 2014 11:37 pm
Forum: Tools and Techniques
Topic: Used dental bits for grinding/shaping etc
Replies: 1
Views: 1557

Re: Used dental bits for grinding/shaping etc

Interesting, although I find that my cheap hand drill seems to run too fast for me to control - but run slowly it has no impact on the material as engraving seems to need circa 20K rpm to be effective. Another dental practice I keep meaning to tap into is the local denture repair business to buy a c...
by ICollett
Sun Mar 09, 2014 9:50 pm
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

ADDENDUM I can't edit the above so a quick additional note. There is an advantage to NOT cutting on a Silhouette machine - cutting through the material leaves score marks on the carrier sheet that holds the material as it passes through the machine. If the cut depth is set incorrectly then, worst ca...
by ICollett
Sun Mar 09, 2014 6:26 pm
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

I think that trying to cut 30 thou styrene isn't the way to go, I think cutting much thinner stuff and laminating it would be better. This would make it easier to build outside framed GWR vans for example. Building up a body with multiple layers of styrene isn't new but this type of tool would make...
by ICollett
Sun Mar 09, 2014 12:27 pm
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

Thanks for the kind words David. My intention was to start as simply as possible with a very basic shed and I think it's achieving my intention of a basic "Hello World" project. There are running cost issues with these machines, the cost of a replacement blade and holder from the manufactu...
by ICollett
Sun Mar 09, 2014 2:33 am
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

Took delivery of a Silhouette Portrait cutting machine the other day and have been getting to grips with the software and operation with a first attempt at the Lambourn goods shed. Not a traditional GWR structure as it was built by the Lambourn Valley Light Railway before the GWR took over the line,...
by ICollett
Tue Feb 11, 2014 9:16 pm
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

I have just taken delivery of 'The 4mm Coal Wagon' by John Hayes published by Wild Swan and purchased from the Pendon Museum bookshop http://www.pendonmuseum.com/shop/view.php?id=50&category=6 which I can heartily recommend - ordered Sunday night, delivered Tuesday morning - excellent :thumb . J...
by ICollett
Sun Feb 09, 2014 8:26 pm
Forum: Tools and Techniques
Topic: Spring stops on solebars - folding technique?
Replies: 4
Views: 2545

Re: Spring stops on solebars - folding technique?

Further developments - As noted, the previous rulers were rather thick, just shy of 1mm thick, and resulted in a rather broad Spring Stop. Another ruler I have hardly used is only 0.62mm, so the rig was reconfigured as below - New Rig.PNG The results are much more satisfactory, although perhaps a li...
by ICollett
Sun Feb 09, 2014 4:58 pm
Forum: Tools and Techniques
Topic: Spring stops on solebars - folding technique?
Replies: 4
Views: 2545

Re: Spring stops on solebars - folding technique?

This is the rig - two 6" steel rules clamped to each other with a 1.5mm 'step' between the two edges. The clamps on each end were just for setting up the step rather than trying to adjust the step with the rules in the vice. P1020193.JPG 1mm brass strip is then folded over the top and forced in...
by ICollett
Sun Feb 09, 2014 12:43 pm
Forum: Tools and Techniques
Topic: Spring stops on solebars - folding technique?
Replies: 4
Views: 2545

Re: Spring stops on solebars - folding technique?

Your procedure would work and would probably require fewer hands to use it successfully than Dave's method. Neither method will help with the round section stops found on some 'modern' wagons. :) Many thanks Wiz, fortunately my preferred period/region (GWR 1880-1911) seems to have had either solid ...
by ICollett
Sun Feb 09, 2014 2:42 am
Forum: Tools and Techniques
Topic: Spring stops on solebars - folding technique?
Replies: 4
Views: 2545

Spring stops on solebars - folding technique?

I am trying to fold brass strip to make spring stops to go on the bottom of the solebar above the spring/axlebox. I understand there's a jig described in "The 4mm Coal Wagon" by John Hayes and I'm ordering a copy from Pendon Museum bookshop as this sounds to be a useful book for other matt...
by ICollett
Sun Feb 02, 2014 10:24 am
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

The Evergreen channel would seem to be oversize at 3.2mm x1.2 mm, would this be noticeable when used for a 4mm scale wagon? I would prefer to use plastic rather than the 3x1 brass channel to avoid the need to solder it to the w-iron etches but Plastruct don't seem to do any suitable channel. I will...
by ICollett
Sat Feb 01, 2014 1:27 am
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

Hurrah, the axle alignment jig has arrived from Brassmasters following a cheque lost in post fiasco from the GPO. So now the wagon works can open for production at last, at least once I've got my backlog of outstanding reports finished. Still having little joy in paring/filing back the Ratio and Coo...
by ICollett
Tue Jan 21, 2014 12:33 am
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

A piece of steel angle will be much less likely to bend. I take it you're referring to the top steel rule? I'm not disagreeing but any steel angle I've had access to has radius corners, I would have reservations about using anything that didn't have a sharp straight edge to it, hence a steel rule f...
by ICollett
Sun Jan 19, 2014 5:41 pm
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

I also find that using a steel rule along the part to be folded helps to apply the pressure more evenly. I usually have a 12" steel rule on top of the piece, sometimes clamped to the table to leave both hands free, a cutting mat under the piece, and a 6" steel rule slid underneath the par...
by ICollett
Sat Jan 18, 2014 6:57 pm
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

Just to get the record straight, I do enjoy soldering quite a lot, and while it wouldn't win any prizes it's something I have done with reasonable success. I realise the question about Low Melt Solder probably made me sound like a bit of a numpty, but it was an honest question in case it provided an...
by ICollett
Sat Jan 18, 2014 2:34 am
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

Many thanks for all the positive suggestions. I haven't been completely idle, but I'm awaiting the arrival of a vital tool from Brassmasters http://www.brassmasters.co.uk/axle_gauges.htm meanwhile I have been studying my Christmas present, the Atkins, Beard and Tourret tome on GWR Goods Wagons. Slig...
by ICollett
Wed Jan 01, 2014 11:10 pm
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

Fair point - and a soldered joint can be undone while a solvent welded joint cannot. Is it possible to use low melting point solder for brass etch? I can't particularly see why not as long as a suitable flux was used?
by ICollett
Wed Jan 01, 2014 2:55 am
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

That's what you get when manufacturer tries to reproduce a half inch thick channel with a millimetre thick plastic moulding. Maybe it would be less work if you went straight to an etched underframe. Acknowledged, but quite a leap in cost per wagon. A single underframe etch (excluding axle-box and s...
by ICollett
Mon Dec 30, 2013 1:03 am
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

In the search for the simplest possible method of springing buffers, plastic or white metal, may I suggest it is preferable to drill right through 0.5mm first. Actually I wasn't complete in my description, I started with a 0.5mm pilot and followed with the 1mm bit. As all my micro-drills are on a 2...
by ICollett
Sun Dec 29, 2013 5:39 pm
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

My preferred method now is to use the plastic sheath from some fine wire pushed on to the tail and the minutest drop of superglue apllied to it's rear. A piece of plasticard of suitable thickness with a notch cut in it serves to space the buffer heads from the shanks during this process. As with al...
by ICollett
Sun Dec 29, 2013 4:46 am
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

First steps - have cleared out the junk in my office and moved the desk for more space. An old three tier computer desk is now a modelling bureau and tools have been moved in from the shed. They seem much happier in the warm and dry. Found R J Essery's LMS Wagons book in the library and am building ...
by ICollett
Mon Dec 16, 2013 7:09 pm
Forum: Standard Gauge Workbench
Topic: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook
Replies: 87
Views: 39255

Re: Starting From Scratch - SGW meets Inglenook

It does of course depend on the quality of these building. Terry - I'm green with envy - it sounds like you have the dream shed there. Mine is a poor 'dog kennel' of an affair by comparison. 7'6"" by 5' and currently under attack from next door's Ivy which has managed to penetrate under t...

Go to advanced search